7

The following code compiles and runs in gcc 4.9.1 and clang-3.6 when using -std=c++11:

struct Bar
{
    int x;
};

struct Foo
{
    static constexpr Bar bars[] = {1, 2, 3};
};

constexpr Bar Foo::bars[];

However, it fails in gcc 4.8.3, resulting in the error message

./cpptest.cpp:14:43: error: could not convert '1' from 'int' to 'const Bar'
     static constexpr Bar bars[] = {1, 2, 3};
                                           ^
./cpptest.cpp:14:43: error: could not convert '2' from 'int' to 'const Bar'
./cpptest.cpp:14:43: error: could not convert '3' from 'int' to 'const Bar'

Incidentally, if I do the same thing but make bars a static const global array, it compiles fine in gcc 4.8 and clang. It will also compile just fine if I surround each of the integer literals in the list with an extra pair of {}.

So is this a bug in gcc 4.8? What does the standard say is the appropriate syntax for this? What part of the c++11 uniform initialization standard is being invoked when I omit the extra braces?

Edit: It looks like the standard says that this should invoke aggregate initialization, which should allow for "brace elision". So it seems it's a bug in gcc 4.8, that was fixed by gcc 4.9, but I'm not at all confident in my reading of the standard. I also can't seem to find any bug report in gcc's bug tracker regarding this, so I could easily be wrong.

1
  • Did you consider it being a bug that was fixed?
    – edmz
    Commented Mar 26, 2015 at 11:39

1 Answer 1

2

In order to do what you want to do, you need specify a constexpr constructor inside Foo:

struct Bar
{
    constexpr Bar(int c) : x(c)
    {}

    int x;
};

struct Foo
{
    static constexpr Bar bars[] = {1, 2, 3};
};

constexpr Bar Foo::bars[];

Apparently gcc 4.8.3 doesn't implicity convert the values inside the curly brackets to Bar objects, while gcc 4.9.1 does.

3
  • Sure, and that's the route that I ended up going down. This ended up exposing another bug in gcc 4.9 (that I reported here: gcc.gnu.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=65695). But my question is, should the standard allow the initialization without those braces? And I think the answer is yes, it's simply a bug in gcc's handling of brace elision with constexpr members. Commented Apr 9, 2015 at 20:07
  • I wouldn't call this a bug. GCC simply demands from you to declare a constexpr constructor when you declare a constexpr variable. I also looked at your bug report and replied to it.What you want to do there shouldn't work: You shouldn't be able to store the address of a non-static member function in a static variable.
    – kamshi
    Commented Apr 10, 2015 at 10:52
  • GCC 4.8 claims to support the ISO/IEC 14882:2011 (c++11) standard. If the failure to allow brace elision violates the standard (and I'm pretty sure it does), then it's a bug in GCC 4.8. And, similarly, the standard has a section on constant expressions. It gives a long list of things that are not constant expressions. Based on my (admittedly amateur) reading of the standard, the address of a non-static member function is a constant expression. Commented Apr 11, 2015 at 1:56

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