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In my understanding of SP-init and IDP-init SSO is as follow:

IDP-init SSO: A base64-encoded saml response is generated by IDP and send to SP, SP then verifies the response and finally the user is logged into the application if the response is valid.

SP-init SSO: A saml request is sent from SP to IDP, then IDP will authenticate the user then send back the saml response, the next part is same as IDP-init SSO.

How do we decide to choose whether the SSO is using SP-init or IDP-init ? SP-init seems to be more secure and reliable than IDP-init SSO because of the authentication part.

closed as primarily opinion-based by Joe, TylerH, Zia, DeiDei, Rob May 19 '18 at 2:56

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

11

To me, the business requirements of the service provider's application tell you:

If all user interaction with the service provider's application will start at a "homepage", or default landing page, then IdP-initiated probably makes a lot of sense (less to break - no signed AuthnRequest needed).

If there are "deeplinks" that are provided to your users to things like reports via email (that is, a user can click on a link that should take them deep within the service provider's application), then SP-initiated is the only way forward.

In both instances, the user will be authenticated at the IdP based on the IdP's authentication rules - neither SP-init or IdP-init is "more secure" in that regard. The flows:

IdP-init:

  1. User clicks link to start IdP-init SSO
  2. IdP validates that User is authenticated - if not redirect for authentication
  3. IdP converts authentication attributes (like username, email, etc.) into SAML assertion and redirects user to SP
  4. SP converts SAML assertion to SP application token and redirects to application

SP-Init:

  1. User clicks link to go to SP application
  2. SP Application determines the user does not have a token and redirects to SP
  3. SP redirects to IdP
  4. IdP validates that User is authenticated - if not redirect for authentication
  5. IdP converts authentication attributes (like username, email, etc.) into SAML assertion and redirects user to SP
  6. SP converts SAML assertion to SP application token and redirects to application

The only difference, as you can see, is the first three steps.

  • For SP-init, user clicks link to go to SP application, I don't think it is a POST binding, how can SP determine the user whether he/she has a token. What does the "token" mean ? – tony.0919 Mar 27 '15 at 15:27
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    The application knows if you're authenticated to it, via whatever session validation token it uses. A cookie, for example - does that cookie exist? If so, is it valid? – Andrew K. Mar 27 '15 at 16:10
  • In my understanding, the link which user clicks to application in the first step of SP init SSO is same as the link which IDP sends saml response to. Am I correct ? – tony.0919 Mar 27 '15 at 23:36
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    It could be, but it could also be a deeplink into some report, or other page that isn't the homepage of the site. IdP can put you one place every time, SP can put you anyplace in the SP application. – Andrew K. Mar 28 '15 at 12:08
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You choose based on the desired or required navigation flow of a user (assuming browser POST binding based on your description).

If your requirements dictate the user start from secure (logged in) website A and navigate without password to site B, this is by definition IdP initiated.

If on the other hand the user is expected to be on an unauthenticated site yet log in with credentials from a partner site, this is where the SP initiated scenario comes into play. StackOverflow itself offers this style of sign in if you choose to log in with a Google account (though an alternative to SAML is used). The user starts somewhere on StackOverflow, clicks the login link, chooses their IdP (in SAML semantics) as Google, and are sent with an authn request to the IdP. After credential challenge of unspecified sort (eg your browser might already have an authenticated session at the IdP site, or the IdP might use two factor auth, etc) the user is returned to the SP site with a SAML response document.

  • 1
    I see no reason that the first scenario would need IdP initiaded SSO. In this case, the A is the IDP and B is the SP. This can easily be implmented using SP initiaded SSO. User is sent to site B, site B detects a user that is not logged in to site B. user is sent to Site A for Auth. Site A detects that the user is already signed in and send the user back to site B with a valid assertion – Stefan Rasmusson Apr 8 '15 at 9:10
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    I've worked with several service-offering websites who only offered IdP-initiated. The unsaid variable here is what exchange patterns the partner site actually supports. That is not to say your counter idea is not valid; I was merely describing where IdP may be used and what it is. One could also argue that scenario A first linking (without SSO) to site B, only to be sent back for SP-Initiated SSO is adding hops, and certainly adding complexity should the SP also issue an AuthnRequest message to the IdP. – Scott Heaberlin Apr 14 '15 at 1:35
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SP-initialized is always to prefer. IDP-initilized will make work easier for the SP implementation but it comes with a buch of problems such as XSRF, interaoperability and deep linking.

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