193

EDIT: this is a duplicate, see here

I can't find any examples of using a dynamic key name when setting the state. This is what I want to do:

inputChangeHandler : function (event) {
    this.setState( { event.target.id  : event.target.value } );
},

where event.target.id is used as the state key to be updated. Is this not possible in React?

  • 3
    This is a duplicate of any question concerning dynamic object keys. It's not specific to react – Cory Danielson Mar 26 '15 at 14:06
  • 9
    var newstate = {}; newstate[event.target.id] = event.target.id; this.setState(newstate); – Cory Danielson Mar 26 '15 at 14:08
  • Thank you, I didn't have a good handle on using objects in general. – trad Mar 26 '15 at 14:45
  • @trad I'm with this problem but, what did you put on your initial State? It doesn't matter, right? – Raphael Onofre Sep 29 '16 at 18:55
232

Thanks to @Cory's hint, i used this:

inputChangeHandler : function (event) {
    var stateObject = function() {
      returnObj = {};
      returnObj[this.target.id] = this.target.value;
         return returnObj;
    }.bind(event)();

    this.setState( stateObject );    
},

If using ES6 or the Babel transpiler to transform your JSX code, you can accomplish this with computed property names, too:

inputChangeHandler : function (event) {
    this.setState({ [event.target.id]: event.target.value });
    // alternatively using template strings for strings
    // this.setState({ [`key${event.target.id}`]: event.target.value });
}
  • 16
    There's also a new syntax for this, if you're using bablejs to build your code. You can use computed property names – Cory Danielson Mar 26 '15 at 17:48
  • The second approach causes syntax error in browsers on WIndows (IE, Chrome). Did anyone notice? – benjaminz Aug 3 '15 at 16:29
  • how to get stated? – Muneem Habib Nov 25 '16 at 2:52
  • Thanks trad, this is what i was looking for to avoid code duplication for <Radio /> implementation. – Adesh M Mar 6 '17 at 9:45
  • 4
    If you set a state using the computed property name like this: this.setState({ [event.target.id]: event.target.value }); then how would you access that state using this.state......? – user3574492 Oct 13 '17 at 9:43
98

When you need to handle multiple controlled input elements, you can add a name attribute to each element and let the handler function choose what to do based on the value of event.target.name.

For example:

inputChangeHandler(event) {
  this.setState({ [event.target.name]: event.target.value });
}

  • 1
    what do the brackets around [event.target.name] indicate? Why are they required? – user798719 Feb 23 '18 at 6:50
  • 1
    As compared to usual approach to named each element separately like this.setState({ userName: e.target.value }); This will handle multiple elements of form as an array and no need to set each individual element – vikram jeet singh Feb 23 '18 at 9:27
  • but still how do I access that state in same way ? like this.state([event.target.name]) ? – Kirankumar Dafda Aug 30 '18 at 9:48
  • That's right, accessible in same way – vikram jeet singh Nov 22 '18 at 1:49
38

How I accomplished this...

inputChangeHandler: function(event) {
  var key = event.target.id
  var val = event.target.value
  var obj  = {}
  obj[key] = val
  this.setState(obj)
},
  • I did similar way but the problem was it still did not render the component, and I ran pillar to post (including this :D), and somewhere found this: this.forceUpdate();which should not have been the case with latest React. Let's see whats the issue later!! – xploreraj Feb 18 '18 at 13:16
12

Just wanted to add, that you can also de-structuring to refactor the code and make it look neater.

inputChangeHandler: function ({ target: { id, value }) {
    this.setState({ [id]: value });
},
5

In loop with .map work like this:

{
    dataForm.map(({ id, placeholder, type }) => {
        return <Input
            value={this.state.type}
            onChangeText={(text) => this.setState({ [type]: text })}
            placeholder={placeholder}
            key={id} />
    })
}

Note the [] in type parameter. Hope this helps :)

0

With ES6+ you can just do [${variable}]

-4

Can use a spread syntax, something like this:

inputChangeHandler : function (event) {
    this.setState( { 
        ...this.state,
        [event.target.id]: event.target.value
    } );
},
  • 7
    React will do the object merging for you, this is bad practice. – Rohmer Mar 14 '17 at 19:50
  • 2
    setState already merges the state with the new props – Leandro Soares Mar 31 '17 at 12:41
  • 1
    basically if you have some inner object and you want to change one propery on that inner object you do it like this: this.setState({selectedItems:{...selectedItems,[item.id]:true}}) – Eran Or Jan 28 '18 at 15:56

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