316

I know what is for... in loop(it iterate over key), but heard the first time about for... of(it iterate over value). I am confused with for... of loop. I didn't get adject. This is the code below :

var arr = [3, 5, 7];
arr.foo = "hello";

for (var i in arr) {
   console.log(i); // logs "0", "1", "2", "foo"
}

for (var i of arr) {
   console.log(i); // logs "3", "5", "7"
    //it is does not log "3", "5", "7","hello"
}

What I got is, for... of iterates over property values. then why it doesn't log(return) "3", "5", "7","hello" instead of "3", "5", "7" ? but for... in loop iterate over each key ("0", "1", "2", "foo"). here for... in loop also iterate over foo key. but for... of not iterarte over value of foo property ie "hello".Why it is like that?

Long story in short:

here i console for... of loop. it should be log "3", "5", "7","hello" but here it logs "3", "5", "7". Why ?

Example Link

  • 1
    in the case you miss it, here is the inception link developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… – Anthony Russell Mar 26 '15 at 18:17
  • 1
    As far as my understanding goes, for ... of was brought into the language to fix the problems with using for ... in with Arrays. Array.prototype could be amended in such a way that extra properties are available, making it unsafe to iterate them as you could get non numeric keys that you weren't expecting. – Phylogenesis Mar 26 '15 at 18:19
  • 1
    For future readers: this is probably not a duplicate of JavaScript of Keyword (for…of loops), since it asks about a specific behavior of the feature, rather than asking for a general overview. – apsillers Mar 26 '15 at 18:38
  • 2
    Just get to used to saying "for <key> in" and "for <value> of" and realize IE doesn't support for..of – BotNet Mar 30 '18 at 20:54

11 Answers 11

238

for in loops over enumerable property names of an object.

for of (new in ES6) does use an object-specific iterator and loops over the values generated by that.

In your example, the array iterator does yield all the values in the array (ignoring non-index properties).

  • 9
    for ... of is standardized in ES6. – Justin Aug 18 '16 at 19:21
  • Indeed, no idea what @AlexanderO'Mara was thinking (and me not reviewing the edit properly) – Bergi Aug 18 '16 at 19:25
  • 2
    That's strange, I swear I read somewhere it was moved back to ES7, but apparently that was not true. My bad. – Alexander O'Mara Aug 18 '16 at 20:50
  • 24
    A mnemonic: 'o'f -> not 'o'bjects, 'i'n -> not 'i'terables – Placoplatr Nov 16 '17 at 9:15
  • 2
    another mnemonic: for... of :: arrays :: arrays always have a length, so you can think for.. [nth element] of.. [q elements] – Nathan Smith Mar 26 '18 at 23:20
186

I find a complete answer at : https://www.typescriptlang.org/docs/handbook/iterators-and-generators.html (Although it is for type script, this is same for javascript too)

Both for..of and for..in statements iterate over lists; the values iterated on are different though, for..in returns a list of keys on the object being iterated, whereas for..of returns a list of values of the numeric properties of the object being iterated.

Here is an example that demonstrates this distinction:

let list = [4, 5, 6];

for (let i in list) {
   console.log(i); // "0", "1", "2",
}

for (let i of list) {
   console.log(i); // "4", "5", "6"
}

Another distinction is that for..in operates on any object; it serves as a way to inspect properties on this object. for..of on the other hand, is mainly interested in values of iterable objects. Built-in objects like Map and Set implement Symbol.iterator property allowing access to stored values.

let pets = new Set(["Cat", "Dog", "Hamster"]);
pets["species"] = "mammals";

for (let pet in pets) {
   console.log(pet); // "species"
}

for (let pet of pets) {
    console.log(pet); // "Cat", "Dog", "Hamster"
}
  • Futhermore, calling something like for(let i of {}) { console.log(i); } would throw an TypeError: VM391:1 Uncaught TypeError: {} is not iterable at <anonymous>:1:14, at least in Chrome – kboom Jan 2 '18 at 10:06
  • TS for the win - the example is incorrect, the latter should return "mammals", not // "Cat", "Dog", "Hamster" – martinp999 Feb 27 '18 at 23:08
  • 4
    I remember it by: for "in" for index. And then for "of" would be the values of each index/key/item. – SherylHohman Jul 14 '18 at 18:38
33

For...in loop

The for...in loop improves upon the weaknesses of the for loop by eliminating the counting logic and exit condition.

Example:

const digits = [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9];

for (const index in digits) {
  console.log(digits[index]);
}

But, you still have to deal with the issue of using an index to access the values of the array, and that stinks; it almost makes it more confusing than before.

Also, the for...in loop can get you into big trouble when you need to add an extra method to an array (or another object). Because for...in loops loop over all enumerable properties, this means if you add any additional properties to the array's prototype, then those properties will also appear in the loop.

Array.prototype.decimalfy = function() {
  for (let i = 0; i < this.length; i++) {
    this[i] = this[i].toFixed(2);
  }
};

const digits = [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9];

for (const index in digits) {
  console.log(digits[index]);
}

Prints:

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

function() {  for (let i = 0; i < this.length; i++) {   this[i] = this[i].toFixed(2);  } }

This is why for...in loops are discouraged when looping over arrays.

NOTE: The forEach loop is another type of for loop in JavaScript. However, forEach() is actually an array method, so it can only be used exclusively with arrays. There is also no way to stop or break a forEach loop. If you need that type of behavior in your loop, you’ll have to use a basic for loop.

For...of loop

The for...of loop is used to loop over any type of data that is iterable.

Example:

const digits = [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9];

for (const digit of digits) {
  console.log(digit);
}

Prints:

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

This makes the for...of loop the most concise version of all the for loops.

But wait, there’s more! The for...of loop also has some additional benefits that fix the weaknesses of the for and for...in loops.

You can stop or break a for...of loop at anytime.

const digits = [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9];

for (const digit of digits) {
  if (digit % 2 === 0) {
    continue;
  }
  console.log(digit);
}

Prints:

1

3

5

7

9

And you don’t have to worry about adding new properties to objects. The for...of loop will only loop over the values in the object.

  • 2
    "The for...in loop improves upon the weaknesses of the for loop by eliminating the counting logic and exit condition" - no, that's not what it does. Not at all. – Bergi Apr 19 '18 at 20:09
  • 1
    @Bergi Could you maybe clarify why you think that's not what it does, and what you actually think it improves on? – Elar Apr 19 '18 at 20:33
  • 2
    It doesn't improve on anything, it has its own raison d'être. It does something totally different than a for (var index=0; index<arr.length; index++) loop (where the index counter is an integer, unlike in your example). – Bergi Apr 19 '18 at 20:42
7

The for-in statement iterates over the enumerable properties of an object, in arbitrary order.

The loop will iterate over all enumerable properties of the object itself and those the object inherits from its constructor's prototype

You can think of it as "for in" basically iterates and list out all the keys.

var str = 'abc';
var arrForOf = [];
var arrForIn = [];

for(value of str){
  arrForOf.push(value);
}

for(value in str){
  arrForIn.push(value);
}

console.log(arrForOf); 
// ["a", "b", "c"]
console.log(arrForIn); 
// ["0", "1", "2", "formatUnicorn", "truncate", "splitOnLast", "contains"]
  • for in will only show the keys if they are added by us, it's not gonna show formatUnicorn – Milad Feb 14 '18 at 9:29
  • 1
    "formatUnicorn", "truncate", "splitOnLast", "contains" print out because stackoverflow override String.prototype. – jasonxia23 Feb 14 at 14:10
7

Difference for..in and for..of:

Both for..in and for..of are looping constructs which are used to iterate over data structures. The only difference is over what they iterate:

  1. for..in iterates over all enumerable property keys of an object
  2. for..of iterates over the values of an iterable object. Examples of iterable objects are arrays, strings, and NodeLists.

Example:

let arr = ['el1', 'el2', 'el3'];

arr.addedProp = 'arrProp';

// elKey are the property keys
for (let elKey in arr) {
  console.log(elKey);
}

// elValue are the property values
for (let elValue of arr) {
  console.log(elValue)
}

In this example we can observe that the for..in loop iterates over the keys of the object, which is an array object in this example. The keys are 0, 1, 2 which correspond to the array elements we added and addedProp. This is how the arr array object looks in chrome devtools:

enter image description here

You see that our for..in loop does nothing more than simply iterating over these values.


The for..of loop in our example iterates over the values of a data structure. The values in this specific example are 'el1', 'el2', 'el3'. The values which an iterable data structure will return using for..of is dependent on the type of iterable object. For example an array will return the values of all the array elements whereas a string returns every individual character of the string.

7

The for...in statement iterates over the enumerable properties of an object, in an arbitrary order. Enumerable properties are those properties whose internal [[Enumerable]] flag is set to true, hence if there is any enumerable property in the prototype chain, the for...in loop will iterate on those as well.

The for...of statement iterates over data that iterable object defines to be iterated over.

Example:

Object.prototype.objCustom = function() {}; 
Array.prototype.arrCustom = function() {};

let iterable = [3, 5, 7];

for (let i in iterable) {
  console.log(i); // logs: 0, 1, 2, "arrCustom", "objCustom"
}

for (let i in iterable) {
  if (iterable.hasOwnProperty(i)) {
    console.log(i); // logs: 0, 1, 2,
  }
}

for (let i of iterable) {
  console.log(i); // logs: 3, 5, 7
}

Like earlier, you can skip adding hasOwnProperty in for...of loops.

6

There are some already defined data types which allows us to iterate over them easily e.g Array, Map, String Objects

Normal for in iterates over the iterator and in response provides us with the keys that are in the order of insertion as shown in below example.

  const numbers = [1,2,3,4,5];
   for(let number in number) {
     console.log(number);
   }

   // result: 0, 1, 2, 3, 4

Now if we try same with for of, then in response it provides us with the values not the keys. e.g

  const numbers = [1,2,3,4,5];
   for(let numbers of numbers) {
    console.log(number);
  }

  // result: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

So looking at both of the iterators we can easily differentiate the difference between both of them.

Note:- For of only works with the Symbol.iterator

So if we try to iterate over normal object, then it will give us an error e.g-

const Room = {
   area: 1000,
   height: 7,
   floor: 2
 }

for(let prop in Room) {
 console.log(prop);
 } 

// Result area, height, floor

for(let prop of Room) {
  console.log(prop);
 } 

Room is not iterable

Now for iterating over we need to define an ES6 Symbol.iterator e.g

  const Room= {
    area: 1000, height: 7, floor: 2,
   [Symbol.iterator]: function* (){
    yield this.area;
    yield this.height;
    yield this.floors;
  }
}


for(let prop of Room) {
  console.log(prop);
 } 

//Result 1000, 7, 2

This is the difference between For in and For of. Hope that it might clear the difference.

1

Everybody did explain why this problem occurs, but it's still very easy to forget about it and then scratching your head why you got wrong results. Especially when you're working on big sets of data when the results seem to be fine at first glance.

Using Object.entries you ensure to go trough all properties:

var arr = [3, 5, 7];
arr.foo = "hello";

for ( var [key, val] of Object.entries( arr ) ) {
   console.log( val );
}

/* Result:

3
5
7
hello

*/
1

Another difference between the two loops, which nobody has mentioned before (source):

Destructuring for...in is deprecated. Use for...of instead.

So if we want to use destructuring in a loop, for get both index and value of each array element, we should to use the for...of loop with the Array method entries():

for (const [idx, el] of arr.entries()) {
    console.log( idx + ': ' + el );
}
  • 1
    Nope. read carefully the "for each...in" is deprecated – Gal Margalit Jun 6 at 14:49
  • 1
    Yes @GalMargalit, I read it carefully. I agree that the for each...in is deprecated (first point), but I did not write about it... I wrote that "Destructuring for...in is deprecated. Use for...of instead." (second point): developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… Do you agree with me @GalMargalit? – simhumileco Jun 6 at 16:26
  • 1
    Haha you are right, I didn't read carefully! True, I was basically thinking the same thing and thought you are referring to another. – Gal Margalit Jun 6 at 22:23
0

A see a lot of good answers, but I decide to put my 5 cents just to have good example:

For in loop

iterates over all enumerable props

let nodes = document.documentElement.childNodes;

for (var key in nodes) {
  console.log( key );
}

For of loop

iterates over all iterable values

let nodes = document.documentElement.childNodes;

for (var node of nodes) {
  console.log( node.toString() );
}

0

I found the following explanation from https://javascript.info/array very helpful:

One of the oldest ways to cycle array items is the for loop over indexes:

let arr = ["Apple", "Orange", "Pear"];

for (let i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) { alert( arr[i] ); } But for arrays there is another form of loop, for..of:

let fruits = ["Apple", "Orange", "Plum"];

// iterates over array elements for (let fruit of fruits) { alert( fruit ); } The for..of doesn’t give access to the number of the current element, just its value, but in most cases that’s enough. And it’s shorter.

Technically, because arrays are objects, it is also possible to use for..in:

let arr = ["Apple", "Orange", "Pear"];

for (let key in arr) { alert( arr[key] ); // Apple, Orange, Pear } But that’s actually a bad idea. There are potential problems with it:

The loop for..in iterates over all properties, not only the numeric ones.

There are so-called “array-like” objects in the browser and in other environments, that look like arrays. That is, they have length and indexes properties, but they may also have other non-numeric properties and methods, which we usually don’t need. The for..in loop will list them though. So if we need to work with array-like objects, then these “extra” properties can become a problem.

The for..in loop is optimized for generic objects, not arrays, and thus is 10-100 times slower. Of course, it’s still very fast. The speedup may only matter in bottlenecks. But still we should be aware of the difference.

Generally, we shouldn’t use for..in for arrays.

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