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I have images with polygons in it. There are black lines going through these polygons. I need a way to remove these black lines with a minimum alteration of the polygons. What I have tried so far:

Step 1) parse the image from the top left corner to the bottom right corner(line by line).
Step 2) Loop through each pixel of a line/row.
Step 3) If you encounter a non-black pixel, put the color value of it in 
        a variable (lets call it lastNonBlack). 
Step 4) If you encounter a black pixel, just overwrite it's color value with lastNonBlack.

And here is the problem with that algorithm. Under some circumstances it splits a polygon (see first picture) or it expands the polygon by a with a line (see second picture).

enter image description here

enter image description here

Then I tried another approach where I take the color of the pixel which is above but that does not work either. Not the "splits" and "extensions" are not horizontal but vertical.

PS: I use Java so a java-solution would be best but since this is an algorithm problem anyone is welcome :)

edit: The above picture were constructed examples to show you the problems. My images look like this:

enter image description here

edit2: I replaced the images with bigger ones that show the problem better

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  • Do you have a max width for your black lines? – Alexandru Barbarosie Mar 26 '15 at 21:08
  • your logic is good. I think the problem is in your code. You might need to upload some of it How do you know if a pixel is black? RGB=0,0,0? – andrew Mar 26 '15 at 21:08
  • @AlexandruBarbarosie no they don't have a max width. They should not end somewhere in the image (their start and end points are at the edge of an image) – Selphiron Mar 26 '15 at 21:30
  • So no upper border at all? Meaning that one the cases is that your whole image is black? – Alexandru Barbarosie Mar 26 '15 at 21:32
  • @andrew sorry I made a mistake while describing the problem. Please look at the pictures again to see the problem – Selphiron Mar 26 '15 at 21:53
1

As algorithms are welcome, I'll show you how I would do it with ImageMagick which is installed on most Linux distros and available for OSX and Windows.

My algorithm would be to make a mask in which all black pixels are transparent, and then overlay that on top of a median-filtered copy of your original image. In the median-filtered image, the black pixels will fall to the bottom of the sorted set of pixels at each point and therefore never be selected as the median, so only a nearby coloured pixel can become the new output pixel. The masked image with the black pixels converted to transparent is then overlaid so that only black pixels in your original image become transaprent and at these places you can see through the original image to the median-filtered one. It is easier than it sounds...

Make black pixels transparent:

convert in.png -transparent black mask.png

enter image description here

Generate filtered image of median of 7x7 neighbourhood

convert in.png -median 7x7 median.png

enter image description here

Overlay mask on top of median-filtered image, so filtered image only shows through at black pixels (which are now transparent)

convert median.png mask.png -composite result.png

enter image description here

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  • I will give it a try but one small question: Why 7x7? – Selphiron Mar 27 '15 at 10:17
  • 1
    Good question:-) It has to be odd, so 3x3 or 5x5 or 7x7. If I chose 3x3, I would be betting that in any rectangle of 3x3 pixels there are no more than 4 black ones, because I will choose the 5th out of the 9 after they are sorted into order (the blacks, being zero, will be the lowest pixels in the sorted list). If I chose 5x5, I would be betting that there are no more than 12 black pixels in any 5x5 block. So, I feel that the bigger the area, the safer my bet - your lines are thin and I doubt there will be 25 black pixels in any 7x7 block. It may well work with 3x3 and be faster, so try it! – Mark Setchell Mar 27 '15 at 10:48
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    Sorry... I have made a correction as I meant the median rather than the mode. So, each group of 49 pixels (7x7) is sorted into increasing order and the 25th one in the sequence is taken - i.e. the one that separates the ordered list into two equal parts. – Mark Setchell Mar 27 '15 at 15:59
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    The idea of the last step is this... the median filter tends to blur details , and smooth sharp edges into round ones. As I don't want that to happen all over your image, I only allow you see the smoothed, filtered image where there were black pixels in your original - so I am guaranteeing not to affect your image outside of the black pixels. If you don't do that step, you risk losing fine details where several narrow strips of different colours meet. If you made a cirlcle with lots of radial black lines emanating from the centre, you would see the effect if your strips of colour were narrow. – Mark Setchell Mar 27 '15 at 16:03
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    The list is ordered by colour, yes, and black will count as zero, so the black pixels will be at the low end of the list - not in the middle where I select the value. The median and mode are both likely to work for your image but I only have a single one to experiment with. – Mark Setchell Mar 27 '15 at 16:44
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Alexandru is on the right track. What you want is something more like a "nearest neighbor" classifier. IF you aren't familiar with this it means that you want to know what color pixel(x,y) should be. You look at the pixels around it and say, well what value are these? Whatever the majority is is what pixel(x,y) should be.

As he said make a structuring element and then do a nearest neighbor classifier. Here is a image with 3 examples

examples of nearest neighbor

Lets look at X. If we are at pixel X (lower right corner) and want to decide what color should this pixel be? we look at the pixels around it and do a small vote. Our structuring element here is a 7x7 neighborhood centered around pixel X we see it is green=24, black=7, white = 18 well since the majority of the pixels are green pixel X should be green.

So that works great, the next question is how big do we make our structuring element? it should be proportional to the maximum size of the line. I think it should be 2*max_line_width + 1 the plus 1 is to make it odd sized(reduces the probability of having ties, and prevents smearing). Why this size? because its larger than the line, so that means a single line won't influence the pixel much. But its small enough that the information is still relevant to the pixel. lets look at some examples.

Pixel Y (upper right) max line width=1. what color should pixel Y be? green=8, black=5, white =12 so Y should be white. But that's incorrect, this is a common error when size is too large. If we use a 3x3 neighborhood we get this green=3,black=3,white=3 you have to make a judgement call here somehow. But you can see it won't incorrectly be classified

No matter what size you choose though, there will always be problems with the edges and corners. Look at pixel Z 3x3 Z=black, 5x5 z=black, 7x7 z=black. so this method isn't perfect, but it works reasonably well.

Just to discuss another shape, alexandru mentioned a t shape enter image description here

Its the same nearest neighboor algorithm, jsut using a different neghborhood shape, as you can see in this example the pixel would be black. But as we already saw, every method/shape has short comings. good luck

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  • woah thats a GREAT explanation, thank you very much for that huge effort. – Selphiron Mar 27 '15 at 17:04
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    yeah, i started it yesterday haha. When I came back today I saw you modified your question, but I figured the info was still good to have so posted anyway. Lots of great info all over this page though, good luck – andrew Mar 27 '15 at 17:08
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You can try some kind of erosion on the image. Select a Structure Element that suits best the type of the lines you have.

I would go with two lines, one vertical and one horizontal. To solve your particular image, you can select size 3:

[l][c][r]         [t]
            and   [c]
                  [b]

Where c is the centre pixel and l and r are your left and right neighbours respectively and t and b - top and bottom. To adjust the solution to a "bigger" problem you must select a longer SE, I would advice maxBlackLineWidth + 2 (or +3 such that the sum is odd).

To compute exact line width:

For pixel in blackPixel 
    #find the major principle axes of the line
    map(Points) visited = bfs(pixel, depth = k)
    #adjust k depending on predicted line width
    x,y = regressionVector(visited) #direction of vector doesn't matter

    x,y = -y,x #perpendicular to that vector
    loop across (x,y) direction from pixel: count black pixel
    loop across (-x,-y,) direction from pixel: count black pixel
    #the sum of the black pixel is the width, record max

To loop across the perpendicular vectors you can adjust Bresenham's line algorithm

Now loop through your image with the two lines of adjusted size.

For pixel in blackPixels
    rc = redPixelCount(vertical(pixel))
    rc += redPixelCount(horizontal(pixel))
    wc = whitePixelCount(vertical(pixel))
    wc += whitePixelCount(horizontal(pixel))
    pixel = rc > wc ? red : white

If your rectangles are aligned with the axis you can the easily fill the small border errors you might get.

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  • Do I get this right? A possible SE would be a line consisting of 3 pixel on another. But you suggest that the length of this SE should be bigger than the maximal width (or height if it is a vertical line). But it is possible that a black straight line is across the whole image. For example it could start at the left end and end at the right and of the image. Or if it is a vertical line it could start at the bottom and got to the top. What do I do than? – Selphiron Mar 26 '15 at 22:49
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I would create a "voting" solution. You iterate over the image and change the color of black pixels to the most frequently color in the neighbourhood of the pixel. Here is a "Java code":

class Pixel
{
    private int R;
    private int G;
    private int B;

    //...

    public int getR() { return R; }
    public int getG() { return G; }
    public int getB() { return B; }

    public boolean equalWithPixel(Pixel p)
    {
        return ( (this.getR() == p.getR()) &&
                 (this.getG() == p.getG()) &&
                 (this.getB() == p.getB()) );
    }

    //...
}

class Solution
{
    public static Pixel[][] removeBlackLine(Pixel[][] image)
    {
        //Get size
        int N = image.length;
        int M = image[0].length;

        //Init result
        Pixel[][] result = new Pixel[N][M];

        //Iteration over all pixels
        for (int y = 0; y < N; y++)
        {
            for (int x = 0; x < M; x++)
            {
                //Get pixel value
                int R = image[y][x].getR();
                int G = image[y][x].getG();
                int B = image[y][x].getB();

                //Check color
                if ( (R == 0) && (G == 0) && (B == 0) ) //Black
                {
                    result[y][x] = Solution.neighbourPixel(image, y, x);
                }
                else //Other color
                {
                    result[y][x] = new Pixel(R, G, B);
                }
            }
        }
    }

    private static void neighbourPixel(Pixel[][] image, int y, int x)
    {
        //Init pixel list
        ArrayList<Pixel> pixels = new ArrayList<Pixel>();
        ArrayList<Integer> numbers = new ArrayList<Integer>();

        //Get size
        int N = image.length;
        int M = image[0].length;

        //Check all pixels
        for (int j = y - 1; y <= y + 1; j++)
        {
            //Check index
            if ( (j < 0) || (j >= N) ) continue;

            for (int i = x - 1; i <= x + 1; i++)
            {
                //Check index
                if ( (i < 0) || (i >= M) ) continue;
                if ( (i == x) && (j == y) ) continue;

                //Get pixel
                Pixel pixel = image[j][i];

                //Check that it is black or not
                if ( (pixel.getR() == 0) &&
                     (pixel.getG() == 0) &&
                     (pixel.getB() == 0) )
                     continue;

                //Check pixel
                int index = 0;
                boolean found = false;
                for (Pixel p : pixels)
                {
                    if (p.equalWithPixel(pixel))
                    {
                        found = true;
                        break;
                    }
                    index++;
                }
                if (found)
                    numbers[index] = numbers[index] + 1;
                else
                {
                    pixels.add(pixel);
                    numbers.add(1);
                }
            }
        }

        //Find most freq. pixel
        int imax = -1;
        int max = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < numbers.length; i++)
        {
            if (numbers[i] > max)
            {
                max = numbers[i];
                imax = i;
            }
        }
        if (imax >= 0)
            Pixel best = pixels[imax];
        else
            Pixel best = new Pixel(0, 0, 0);

        //Return
        return new Pixel(best.getR(), best.getG(), best.getB());
    }
}
1

I would go with median filter approach ,below shows the c++ code .you can pass a kernel size 1x1,3x3,5x5,7x7 which gives you different results according to your needs(types of image).

//inputImage = std::vector , kernalSize = 3, width = 256, height= 256 //

 std::vector<double> medianFilter(std::vector<double> inputImage, double kernalSize,int width, int height)
    {
       /* Fill all the values to output image */
       vector<double> outImage = inputImage;
      for(int y = kernalSize; y < height - kernalSize; y++)
      {
         for(int x = kernalSize; x < width - kernalSize; x++)
         {
           std::vector<double> tempList;
           for(int i = - kernalSize; i <= kernalSize; i++)
             {
               for(int j = -kernalSize; j <= kernalSize; j++)
                 {
                   double pixelValue = inputImage[(y+j)*width + (x+i)];
                   tempList.push_back(pixelValue);
                 }
             }
            std::sort(tempList.begin(),tempList.end());
            double newPixelValue = tempList[tempList.size()/2];
            outImage[y*width + x] = newPixelValue;
          }
       }   
      return outImage;          
     }

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