-4

Let's say I have a long list of lists with punctuation symbols, spaces, etc, like this:

list_1 = [[the guy was plaguy but unable to play football, but he was able to play tennis],[That was absolute cool],...,[This is an implicit living.]]

And I have another long list like this:

list_2 =['unable', 'unquestioning', 'implicit',...,'living', 'relative', 'comparative']

How can I extract the count or frecuency of all the words that appear in list_2 for each sublist of list_1?. For example given the above lists:

list_2 =['unable', 'unquestioning', 'implicit',...,'living', 'relative', 'comparative']

[the guy was unable to play football, but he was able to play tennis]

Since unable appears in the previous sublist of list_2 the count for this list is 1.

list_2 =['unable', 'unquestioning', 'implicit',...,'living', 'relative', 'comparative']

[That was absolute cool]

Since there are not words of list_2 that appear in the previous sublist, the count is 0.

list_2 =['unable', 'unquestioning', 'implicit',...,'living', 'relative', 'comparative']

[This is an implicit living.]

Since implicit and living appear in the previous sublist of list_2 the count for this list is 2.

Than the desired output is [1,0,2].

Any idea of how to aproach this task in order to return a list of counts?. Thanks in advance guys.

For example:

>>> [sum(1 for word in list_2 if word in sentence) for sublist in list_1 for sentence in sublist]

Is wrong since is confusing two words guy and playguy. Any idea of how to fix this?

3
  • If you convert the lists or strings into sets of words, then the rest of the problem becomes much easier to solve. Generally speaking you should try to post some code that has a specific issue that needs fixing/improving.
    – Tom Dalton
    Mar 26 '15 at 23:57
  • If the input list is ['this is is a test'] and ['is'], is your desired output [1] or [2]?
    – Tom Dalton
    Mar 26 '15 at 23:58
  • Thanks for the feedback @TomDalton [1] Mar 27 '15 at 0:02
2

Use the built-in function sum with list comprehension

>>> list_1 = [['the guy was unable to play football, but he was able to play tennis'],['That was absolute cool'],['This is implicit living.']]
>>> list_2 =['unable', 'unquestioning', 'implicit','living', 'relative', 'comparative']   
>>> [sum(1 for word in list_2 if word in sentence) for sublist in list_1 for sentence in sublist]

[1, 0, 2]
3
  • Thanks for the help. The problem with this aproach is that in my actual list I have for instance plaguy and guy this procedure is confusing the fact that plaguy and `guy are different words. Any idea of how to fix this issue?. Mar 27 '15 at 0:05
  • 2
    I don't understand the issue. The counts would remain the same regardless given the list of words you are matching against. Mar 27 '15 at 0:11
  • The problem is that when I test this with the above list of lists and a bigger list of strings the numbers doesnt match. Is there any way that I can send you the big list?. Mar 27 '15 at 0:17
1

The trick is to use the split() method and list comprehensions. If you only use spaces to separate:

list_1 = ["the guy was unable to play football but he was able to play tennis", "That was absolute cool", "This is implicit living"]

list_2 =['unable', 'unquestioning', 'implicit','living', 'relative', 'comparative']

print([sum(sum(1 for j in list_2 if j in i.split()) for i in k for k) inlist_1])

However, if you want to use all non-alphanumeric to tokenize, you should use re:

import re

list_1 = ["the guy was unable to play football,but he was able to play tennis", "That was absolute cool", "This is implicit living"]
list_2 =['unable', 'unquestioning', 'implicit','living', 'relative', 'comparative']

print(sum([sum(1 for j in list_2 if re.split("\W",i)) for i in k) for k in list_1])

The \W character set is all non-alphanumeric.

5
  • I got this error:Traceback (most recent call last): File "/Users/user/PycharmProjects/PAN-pruebas/urgente.py", line 11, in <module> res = ([sum(i.split().count(j) for j in list_2) for i in list_1]) File "/script.py", line 11, in <genexpr> res = ([sum(i.split().count(j) for j in list_2) for i in list_1]) AttributeError: 'list' object has no attribute 'split' Mar 27 '15 at 0:12
  • 1
    @newWithPython oh I thought that each string being wrapped in a list was a typo. Is there any reason why they are wrapped like that? Can there be multiple strings in one of those lists? I will accomodate my answer for that.
    – Maltysen
    Mar 27 '15 at 0:14
  • each sublist is a sentence, that's why I have been troubles. Mar 27 '15 at 0:14
  • 1
    @newWithPython Yes, but can there be multiple strings in each sublist?
    – Maltysen
    Mar 27 '15 at 0:15
  • Yes there can be multiple. Thanks for the feed Mar 27 '15 at 0:22
1

I'd rather use a regular expression. First, because you need to match a whole word, which is complicated with other string search methods. And also, even if it seems a bazooka, it's often very efficient.

You first generate a regular expression from the list_2, then search the sentences of list_1 using it. The regular expression is constructed like that: "(\bword1\b|\bword2\b|...)" which means "either whole word1 or whole word2 or...". \b means matching at the beginning or end of a word.

I made the assumption that you want the result for each sublist of list_1 and not for each sentence of each sublist.

_regex = re.compile(r"(\b{}\b)".format(r"\b|\b".join(list_2)))
word_counts = [ 
    sum(
        sum(1 for occurence in _regex.findall(sentence))
        for sentence in sublist
    ) for sublist in list_1
]

Here you can find a whole sample code with a comparison of performance against a normal string search, knowing that matching whole words would require more work, and so would be even less efficient.

9
  • Thanks for the support. This actually worked, any idea of how to aproach this with just a list instead of a function?. Thank you! Mar 27 '15 at 6:18
  • 1
    @newWithPython: I edited the code, but I'm not sure that's what you are asking. If not, could you please explain what you mean?
    – Cilyan
    Mar 27 '15 at 13:56
  • Sorry... this task is confusing. The problem with this aproach is that for instance lets say I pass this list:list_2 =['unable', 'unquestioning', 'implicit',...,'living', 'relative', 'comparative, 'cool', uncool] and I use this other list which is actually the one that I would like to compute the frecuencies of the words that ocurre in: list_1 = [[the guy was plaguy but unable to play football, but he was able to play tennis],[That was absolute cool],...,[This is an implicit living.]]. Mar 27 '15 at 19:32
  • 1
    I'm sorry, I'm having the most difficulties understanding what you are trying to explain. Are you trying yo get the occurrences per words?
    – Cilyan
    Mar 28 '15 at 1:56
  • 1
    I mean, do you want "the number of times all the words in list_2 are present in list_1" or do you want "the number of times the word 1 in list_2 occurs in list_1, and the number of times the word 2 in list_2 occurs in list_1 and so on" ?
    – Cilyan
    Mar 28 '15 at 1:57

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.