23

I have a huge data set and prior to machine learning modeling it is always suggested that first you should remove highly correlated descriptors(columns) how can i calculate the column wice correlation and remove the column with a threshold value say remove all the columns or descriptors having >0.8 correlation. also it should retained the headers in reduce data..

Example data set

 GA      PN       PC     MBP      GR     AP   
0.033   6.652   6.681   0.194   0.874   3.177    
0.034   9.039   6.224   0.194   1.137   3.4      
0.035   10.936  10.304  1.015   0.911   4.9      
0.022   10.11   9.603   1.374   0.848   4.566    
0.035   2.963   17.156  0.599   0.823   9.406    
0.033   10.872  10.244  1.015   0.574   4.871     
0.035   21.694  22.389  1.015   0.859   9.259     
0.035   10.936  10.304  1.015   0.911   4.5       

Please help....

  • 2
    Please note that stackoverflow is not a code writing service. Show us what you have tried so far and we will try to help you when you're stuck. – cel Mar 27 '15 at 8:42
  • 4
    @cel thanks for your reply, Question without Code............ !, I am not here to avail free code writing service I just want to capture little bit knowledge from the experience programmers with discussing things. rather codes, i was just expecting a suggestion for appropriate library of method. thanks – jax Mar 27 '15 at 9:31
24

Here is the approach which I have used -

def correlation(dataset, threshold):
    col_corr = set() # Set of all the names of deleted columns
    corr_matrix = dataset.corr()
    for i in range(len(corr_matrix.columns)):
        for j in range(i):
            if (corr_matrix.iloc[i, j] >= threshold) and (corr_matrix.columns[j] not in col_corr):
                colname = corr_matrix.columns[i] # getting the name of column
                col_corr.add(colname)
                if colname in dataset.columns:
                    del dataset[colname] # deleting the column from the dataset

    print(dataset)

Hope this helps!

  • 5
    I feel like this solution fails in the following general case: Say you have columns c1, c2, and c3. c1 and c2 are correlated above the threshold, the same goes for c2 and c3. With this solution both c2 and c3 will be dropped even though c3 may not be correlated with c1 above that threshold. I suggest changing: if corr_matrix.iloc[i, j] >= threshold: To: if corr_matrix.iloc[i, j] >= threshold and (corr_matrix.columns[j] not in col_corr): – vcovo Feb 22 at 16:08
  • @vcovo If c1 & c2 are correlated and c2 & c3 are correlated, then there is a high chance that c1 & c3 will also be correlated. Although, if that is not true, then I believe that your suggestion of changing the code is correct. – NISHA DAGA Feb 23 at 17:43
  • 1
    They most likely would be correlated but not necessarily above the same threshold. This lead to a significant difference in removed columns for my use case. I ended up with 218 columns instead of 180 when adding the additional condition mentioned in the first comment. – vcovo Feb 24 at 19:41
  • 2
    Makes sense. Have updated the code as per your suggestion. – NISHA DAGA Feb 26 at 14:36
13

The method here worked well for me, only a few lines of code: https://chrisalbon.com/machine_learning/feature_selection/drop_highly_correlated_features/

import numpy as np

# Create correlation matrix
corr_matrix = df.corr().abs()

# Select upper triangle of correlation matrix
upper = corr_matrix.where(np.triu(np.ones(corr_matrix.shape), k=1).astype(np.bool))

# Find features with correlation greater than 0.95
to_drop = [column for column in upper.columns if any(upper[column] > 0.95)]

# Drop features 
df.drop(to_drop, axis=1, inplace=True)
  • isn't this flawed? Always first column is dropped even though it might not be highly correlated with any other column. when upper triangle is selected none of the first col value remains – Sushant Kulkarni Nov 7 at 3:58
  • have you ever output corr_matrix and see what does it look like first? – Cherry Wu Nov 7 at 4:22
  • 1
    I got an error while dropping the selected features, the following code worked for me df.drop(to_drop,axis=1,inplace=True) – ikbel benabdessamad Nov 7 at 15:50
  • 1
    @ikbelbenabdessamad yeah, your code is better. I just updated that old version code, thank you! – Cherry Wu Nov 7 at 19:16
3

You can use the following for a given data frame df:

corr_matrix = df.corr().abs()
high_corr_var=np.where(corr_matrix>0.8)
high_corr_var=[(corr_matrix.columns[x],corr_matrix.columns[y]) for x,y in zip(*high_corr_var) if x!=y and x<y]
  • 1
    This did not work for me. Please consider rewriting your solution as a method. Error: "ValueError: too many values to unpack (expected 2)". – MyopicVisage Aug 4 '17 at 19:54
  • 1
    It should rather be high_corr_var=[(corr_matrix.index[x],corr_matrix.columns[y]) for x,y in zip(*high_corr_var) if x!=y and x<y] – Jeru Luke Sep 26 '17 at 16:46
2

I took the liberty to modify TomDobbs' answer. The reported bug in the comments is removed now. Also, the new function filters out the negative correlation, too.

def corr_df(x, corr_val):
    '''
    Obj: Drops features that are strongly correlated to other features.
          This lowers model complexity, and aids in generalizing the model.
    Inputs:
          df: features df (x)
          corr_val: Columns are dropped relative to the corr_val input (e.g. 0.8)
    Output: df that only includes uncorrelated features
    '''

    # Creates Correlation Matrix and Instantiates
    corr_matrix = x.corr()
    iters = range(len(corr_matrix.columns) - 1)
    drop_cols = []

    # Iterates through Correlation Matrix Table to find correlated columns
    for i in iters:
        for j in range(i):
            item = corr_matrix.iloc[j:(j+1), (i+1):(i+2)]
            col = item.columns
            row = item.index
            val = item.values
            if abs(val) >= corr_val:
                # Prints the correlated feature set and the corr val
                print(col.values[0], "|", row.values[0], "|", round(val[0][0], 2))
                drop_cols.append(i)

    drops = sorted(set(drop_cols))[::-1]

    # Drops the correlated columns
    for i in drops:
        col = x.iloc[:, (i+1):(i+2)].columns.values
        x = x.drop(col, axis=1)
    return x
  • The loops you have here skip the first two columns of the corr_matrix, and so correlation between col1 & col2 is not considered, after that looks ok – Ryan Feb 6 at 15:26
  • @Ryan How did you fix that? – poPYtheSailor Mar 19 at 5:39
  • @poPYtheSailor Please see my posted solution – Ryan Apr 1 at 13:09
1

Firstly, I'd suggest using something like PCA as a dimensionality reduction method, but if you have to roll your own then your question is insufficiently constrained. Where two columns are correlated, which one do you want to remove? What if column A is correlated with column B, while column B is correlated with column C, but not column A?

You can get a pairwise matrix of correlations by calling DataFrame.corr() (docs) which might help you with developing your algorithm, but eventually you need to convert that into a list of columns to keep.

  • While I totally agree with your reasoning, this does not really answer the question. PCA is a more advanced concept for dimension reduction. But note that using correlations does work and the question is a reasonable (but definitely lacking research effort IMO). – cel Mar 27 '15 at 8:40
  • @Jamie bull Thanks for your kind reply before going to advanced techniques like dimensionality reduction(Ex. PCA ) or Feature selection method (Ex. Tree based or SVM based feature elimination ) it is always suggested to remove useless feature with the help of basic techniques (like variance calculation of correlation calculation), that I learned with the help of various published works available. And as per the second part of your comment "correlations by calling DataFrame.corr()" would be helpful for my case. – jax Mar 27 '15 at 9:09
  • 2
    @jax, it is always suggested to remove useless feature with the help of basic techniques. This is not true. There are various methods which do not require such a preprocessing step. – cel Mar 27 '15 at 9:20
  • @cel ok, actually i was following some published work so they have suggested the preprocessing steps. Can you please suggest me any one such method which not bother about preprocessing steps thanks . – jax Mar 27 '15 at 9:46
  • 1
    @JamieBull Thanks for your reply i have already been there(the web link you have suggested) before posting this. But if you have gone through the Questions careful this post covers only half answer of the Question but i have already read a lot and hopefully soon i will post answer with my self. thanks a lot for all your support and interest. thanks – jax Mar 27 '15 at 15:31
1

Plug your features dataframe in this function and just set your correlation threshold. It'll auto drop columns, but will also give you a diagnostic of the columns it drops if you want to do it manually.

def corr_df(x, corr_val):
    '''
    Obj: Drops features that are strongly correlated to other features.
          This lowers model complexity, and aids in generalizing the model.
    Inputs:
          df: features df (x)
          corr_val: Columns are dropped relative to the corr_val input (e.g. 0.8)
    Output: df that only includes uncorrelated features
    '''

    # Creates Correlation Matrix and Instantiates
    corr_matrix = x.corr()
    iters = range(len(corr_matrix.columns) - 1)
    drop_cols = []

    # Iterates through Correlation Matrix Table to find correlated columns
    for i in iters:
        for j in range(i):
            item = corr_matrix.iloc[j:(j+1), (i+1):(i+2)]
            col = item.columns
            row = item.index
            val = item.values
            if val >= corr_val:
                # Prints the correlated feature set and the corr val
                print(col.values[0], "|", row.values[0], "|", round(val[0][0], 2))
                drop_cols.append(i)

    drops = sorted(set(drop_cols))[::-1]

    # Drops the correlated columns
    for i in drops:
        col = x.iloc[:, (i+1):(i+2)].columns.values
        df = x.drop(col, axis=1)

    return df
  • 5
    This doesn't seem to work for me. The correlations are found and the pairs that match the threshold (i.e. have a higher correlation) are printed. But the resulting dataframe is only missing one (the first) variable, that has a high correlation. – n1k31t4 Jun 13 '17 at 21:30
0

A small revision to the solution posted by user3025698 that resolves an issue where the correlation between the first two columns is not captured and some data type checking.

def filter_df_corr(inp_data, corr_val):
    '''
    Returns an array or dataframe (based on type(inp_data) adjusted to drop \
        columns with high correlation to one another. Takes second arg corr_val
        that defines the cutoff

    ----------
    inp_data : np.array, pd.DataFrame
        Values to consider
    corr_val : float
        Value [0, 1] on which to base the correlation cutoff
    '''
    # Creates Correlation Matrix
    if isinstance(inp_data, np.ndarray):
        inp_data = pd.DataFrame(data=inp_data)
        array_flag = True
    else:
        array_flag = False
    corr_matrix = inp_data.corr()

    # Iterates through Correlation Matrix Table to find correlated columns
    drop_cols = []
    n_cols = len(corr_matrix.columns)

    for i in range(n_cols):
        for k in range(i+1, n_cols):
            val = corr_matrix.iloc[k, i]
            col = corr_matrix.columns[i]
            row = corr_matrix.index[k]
            if abs(val) >= corr_val:
                # Prints the correlated feature set and the corr val
                print(col, "|", row, "|", round(val, 2))
                drop_cols.append(col)

    # Drops the correlated columns
    drop_cols = set(drop_cols)
    inp_data = inp_data.drop(columns=drop_cols)
    # Return same type as inp
    if array_flag:
        return inp_data.values
    else:
        return inp_data
0

Another effective way i found to find correlation is to use pandas profiling. Once you have your dataframe ready just use

import pandas_profiling as pp

 your_df_report= pp.ProfileReport(your_df)
 your_df_report.to_file("your_df_report.html")

This report in html clearly gives you detailed report on your data frame which is nothing but EDA which includes your co relation between different features as well. It will suggest you to drop columns with high co relation as well.

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