58

I have code like this:

public void Method()
{
    if(something)
    {
        // Some code
        if(something2)
        {
            // Now I should break from ifs and go to the code outside ifs
        }
        return;
    }
    // The code I want to go if the second if is true
}

Is there a possibility to go to that code after ifs without using any go to statement or extracting rest of the code to the other method?


Yes, I know Else ;)
But this code is farly long and should be run IF the first IF is false and when the first IF is true and the second is false. So extracting a method I think is the best idea.

8
  • 2
    In the given code an else might be enough. Bu tin general you should structure your code so that you don't need this.
    – ℍ ℍ
    Mar 27, 2015 at 9:32
  • 2
    I'm looking for clever answers to this question, other than else. You should change title to like "break out deeply nested ifs" or something. Otherwise, you'll just get unwanted downvotes by people who don't read. Mar 27, 2015 at 9:38
  • 1
    The bit of code you've given is too simple and can simply be changed with else or !something2 etc. So your code really won't help get a good answer. I suggest to give a better example or post your actual code.
    – kjbartel
    Mar 27, 2015 at 9:42
  • 1
    It sounds more as though you need to look into restructuring your logic, you haven't really explained why else return; isn't a viable option
    – Sayse
    Mar 27, 2015 at 9:43

14 Answers 14

62

To answer your question:

public void Method()
{
    do
    {
        if (something)
        {
            // some code
            if (something2)
            {
                break;
            }
            
            return;
        }
        break;
    }
    while( false );

    // The code I want to go if the second `if` is true
}
10
  • 38
    yet it's the only one that truly answered OP's question.
    – dylanh724
    Oct 27, 2017 at 6:31
  • 9
    Wrong, in C# break only breaks you out of an enclosing loop or switch statement. It will not break you out of an if block. Jan 24, 2018 at 21:18
  • 20
    @user2163234 I think you're misunderstanding his solution. He wrapped the if in an otherwise-meaningless while loop. So break breaks out of the while loop, which is functionally equivalent to breaking out of the if (since the if is the only child of the while.
    – Matthew
    Aug 6, 2018 at 22:45
  • 4
    @SylkerTeles I was so stupid. I should have written do { ... }while(false);. :p
    – cshu
    Oct 18, 2018 at 5:38
  • 4
    @cshu Why not edit this to include one of the safer options with less risk of an accidental infinite loop?
    – Rob Mosher
    Oct 16, 2020 at 14:10
28

You can use a goto to drop past some code. In the example, if thing1 is true then the check for things2 is bypassed.

if (something) {
    do_stuff();
    if (thing1) { 
        do_thing1();
        goto SkipToEnd;
    }
    if (thing2) {
        do_thing2();
    }
SkipToEnd:
    do_thing3();
}
1
  • 25
    The concept of "without using gotos" is nonsense or a homework problem. You use what is available to do the job, that makes your code clear to the next reader. Artificial constructs to avoid an obvious solution help no one. Gotos should ideally only be used to go forward in code, never into another method, and never for looping.
    – Engineer
    Nov 7, 2017 at 18:46
20

This is a variation of something I learned several years back. Apparently, this is popular with C++ developers.

First off, I think I know why you want to break out of IF blocks. For me, I don't like a bunch of nested blocks because 1) it makes the code look messy and 2) it can be a PITA to maintain if you have to move logic around.

Consider a do/while loop instead:

public void Method()
{
    bool something = true, something2 = false;

    do
    {
        if (!something)
            break;

        if (something2)
            break;

    } while (false);
}

The do/while loop is guaranteed to run only once just like an IF block thanks to the hardcoded false condition. When you want to exit early, just break.

1
  • 2
    Since this is still getting upvotes, I may as well mention my love/hate relationship with this method. Normally, if you have an IF statement within a loop, you can use break within the IF block to break out of the parent loop. However, if you use the technique in my answer here, the aforementioned inner IF would be replaced by a loop, so using break within that would just break you out of your "IF loop", leaving you still within the main loop. May 29, 2019 at 14:10
15
public void Method()
{
    if(something)
    {
        // Some code
        if(something2)
        {
            // Now I should break from ifs and go to the code outside ifs
           goto done;
        }
        return;
    }
    // The code I want to go if the second if is true
    done: // etc.
}

Same question

Long answer

1
  • 7
    I gave this answer a +1 because of the supporting evidence from Microsoft, specifically: "The goto statement is also useful to get out of deeply nested loops."
    – gregsonian
    May 4, 2018 at 12:40
5

Another way starting from C# 7.0 would be using local functions. You could name the local function with a meaningful name, and call it directly before declaring it (for clarity). Here is your example rewritten:

public void Method()
{
    // Some code here
    bool something = true, something2 = true;

    DoSomething();
    void DoSomething()
    {
        if (something)
        {
            // Some code
            if (something2)
            {
                // Now I should break from ifs and go to the code outside ifs
                return;
            }
            return;
        }
    }

    // The code I want to go if the second if is true
    // More code here
}
3
public void Method()
{
    if(something)
    {
        // Some code
        if(!something2)
        {
            return;
        }
    }
    // The code I want to go if the second if is true
}
1
  • 1
    Old answer but for future viewers thinking this is a simple solution, return breaks out of Method() too, so the code OP wanted to run (as it is outside of the if statements, but inside the same method).
    – M. Davis
    Jan 31, 2020 at 13:22
3

In this case, insert a single else:

public void Method()
{
    if(something)
    {
        // Some code
        if(something2)
        {
            // Now I should break from ifs and go to the code outside ifs
        }
        else 
            return;
    }
    // The code I want to go if the second if is true
}

Generally: There is no break in an if/else sequence, simply arrange your code correctly in if / if else / else clauses.

1
public void Method()
{
    if(something)
    {
        // Some code
        if(something2)
        {
            // The code I want to go if the second if is true
        }
        return;
    }
}
1

You can return only if !something2 or use else return:

public void Method()
{
    if(something)
    {
        //some code
        if(something2)
        {
            //now I should break from ifs and go to the code outside ifs
        }
        if(!something2) // or else
            return;
    }
    // The code I want to go if the second if is true
}
3
  • 1
    The only reason to do that instead of simply using an else is if the body of the inner ifcould change something2.
    – CompuChip
    Mar 27, 2015 at 9:35
  • @CompuChip: good point, so either use !something2 or else. Mar 27, 2015 at 9:36
  • You don't even need the first if if it returns when false. Just check if (!something2) and return. The example code is too simple and obviously not his real problem. Unless he's a complete noob......
    – kjbartel
    Mar 27, 2015 at 9:45
1

In your code example, you should simply run the code after the ifs inside the second if instead (or set a flag like someone else mentioned, depending on the context). Use method calls to improve readability and reduce nesting.

As for actually escaping ifs, I think there is a way that conforms much more to C# standards than the answers I've seen here. Simply extract the contents of the if statement to a separate method. This also increases readability. So:

public void Method()
{
    if(something)
    {
        //some code
        if (somethingelse)
        {
            //break if
        }

        //some other code running if the above if didn't trigger
    }
}

This can be accomplished as such:

public void Method()
{
    if(something)
    {
        DoSomething();
    }
}

public void DoSomething()
{
    //some code
    if (somethingelse)
    {
        return;
    }

    //some other code running if the above if didn't trigger
}
2
  • The old-school programmer in me cringes at the use of all those calls and stack popping, but of course our magic compilers today will make this efficient, and we don't sweat a few cycles anymore. :)
    – Engineer
    Jun 10, 2021 at 6:07
  • @Engineer Heh, today Readability is king :) Jul 27, 2021 at 16:48
1

You can also use a lambda

if (new Func<bool>(() =>
{
    if (something1)
    {
        // Some code that calculates "something2"
        if (something2)
        {
            // Now I should break from ifs and go to the code outside ifs
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
})())
{
    // The code I want to go if the second if is true
}

P.S. I think I know why people would want this. "Run stuff if all conditions are true, otherwise run other stuff". And the conditions are too complicated to put into one if or they depend one on another.

1
  • An explanation would be in order. E.g., how does it solve the problem? What is the idea/gist? From the Help Center: "...always explain why the solution you're presenting is appropriate and how it works". Please respond by editing your answer, not here in comments (without "Edit:", "Update:", or similar - the answer should appear as if it was written today). Feb 13, 2022 at 12:16
0

Try adding a control variable:

public void Method()
{
    bool doSomethingElse = true;
    if(something)
    {
        // Some code
        if(!something2)
        {
            doSomethingElse = false;
        }
    }
    if(doSomethingElse)
    {
        // The code I want to go if the second if is true
    }
}
0

Another variant that may be really useful in more complicated cases:

try {
    if (something)
    {
        // Some code
        if (something2)
        {
            throw new Exception("Weird-01.");
            // Now you will go to the catch statement
        }
        if (something3)
        {
            throw new Exception("Weird-02.");
            // Now you will go to the catch statement
        }
        // Some code
        return;
    }
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    Console.WriteLine(ex); // You will get your Weird-01 or Weird-02 here
}
// The code I want to go if the second or third if is true
2
0
  if (contREsponse == "yes")
                {
                    cont = true;
                }
                else if (contREsponse == "no")
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("Come back, when you change your mind.");                    
                    //exit environment:  
                    Environment.Exit(0);
                }

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