23

I have code like this:

public void Method()
{
    if(something)
    {
        //some code
        if(something2)
        {
            now I should break from ifs and go to te code outside ifs
        }
    return;
    }
    // The code i want to go if the second if is true
}

I want to know if there is any possibility to go to that code after ifs without using any goto statement or extracting rest of the code to the other method.

Update:

Yes I know Else ;) But this code is farly long and should be runned IF the first IF is false and when first IF is true And second is false. so extracting method I think is best Idea

  • 1
    In the given code an else might be enough. Bu tin general you should structure your code so that you don't need this. – Henk Holterman Mar 27 '15 at 9:32
  • 2
    I'm looking for clever answers to this question, other than else. You should change title to like "break out deeply nested ifs" or something. Otherwise, you'll just get unwanted downvotes by people who don't read. – Furkan Omay Mar 27 '15 at 9:38
  • 1
    The bit of code you've given is too simple and can simply be changed with else or !something2 etc. So your code really won't help get a good answer. I suggest to give a better example or post your actual code. – kjbartel Mar 27 '15 at 9:42
  • 1
    It sounds more as though you need to look into restructuring your logic, you haven't really explained why else return; isn't a viable option – Sayse Mar 27 '15 at 9:43

11 Answers 11

21

To answer your question:

public void Method()
{
    while(true){
        if(something)
        {
            //some code
            if(something2)
            {
                break;
            }
        return;
        }
        break;
    }
    // The code i want to go if the second if is true
}
  • 6
    Ugly and hacky. – kjbartel Mar 27 '15 at 10:22
  • 16
    yet it's the only one that truly answered OP's question. – dylanh724 Oct 27 '17 at 6:31
  • 2
    Wrong, in C# break only breaks you out of an enclosing loop or switch statement. It will not break you out of an if block. – user2163234 Jan 24 '18 at 21:18
  • 5
    @user2163234 I think you're misunderstanding his solution. He wrapped the if in an otherwise-meaningless while loop. So break breaks out of the while loop, which is functionally equivalent to breaking out of the if (since the if is the only child of the while. – Matthew Aug 6 '18 at 22:45
  • 2
    @Matthew my mistake. – user2163234 Aug 20 '18 at 17:12
9

You can use a goto to drop past some code. In the example, if thing1 is true then the check for things2 is bypassed.

if (something) {
    do_stuff();
    if (thing1) { 
        do_thing1();
        goto SkipToEnd;
    }
    if (thing2) {
        do_thing2();
    }
SkipToEnd:
    do_thing3();
}
  • 6
    The concept of "without using gotos" is nonsense or a homework problem. You use what is available to do the job, that makes your code clear to the next reader. Artificial constructs to avoid an obvious solution help no one. Gotos should ideally only be used to go forward in code, never into another method, and never for looping. – Engineer Nov 7 '17 at 18:46
8

This is a variation of something I learned several years back. Apparently, this is popular with C++ developers.

First off, I think I know why you want to break out of IF blocks. For me, I don't like a bunch of nested blocks because 1) it makes the code look messy and 2) it can be a pia to maintain if you have to move logic around.

Consider a do/while loop instead:

public void Method()
{
    bool something = true, something2 = false;

    do
    {
        if (!something) break;

        if (something2) break;

    } while (false);
}

The do/while loop is guaranteed to run only once just like an IF block thanks to the hardcoded false condition. When you want to exit early, just break.

  • Since this is still getting upvotes, I may as well mention my love/hate relationship with this method. Normally, if you have an IF statement within a loop, you can use break within the IF block to break out of the parent loop. However, if you use the technique in my answer here, the aforementioned inner IF would be replaced by a loop, so using break within that would just break you out of your "IF loop", leaving you still within the main loop. – oscilatingcretin May 29 at 14:10
5
public void Method()
{
    if(something)
    {
    //some code
        if(something2)
        {
           // now I should break from ifs and go to te code outside ifs
           goto done;
        }
        return;
    }
    // The code i want to go if the second if is true
    done: // etc.
}

same question

long answer

  • I gave this answer a +1 because of the supporting evidence from Microsoft, specifically: "The goto statement is also useful to get out of deeply nested loops." – gregsonian May 4 '18 at 12:40
2

In this case, insert a single else:

public void Method()
{
    if(something)
    {
        // some code
        if(something2)
        {
            // now I should break from ifs and go to te code outside ifs
        }
        else return;
    }
    // The code i want to go if the second if is true
}

Generally: There is no break in an if/else sequence, simply arrange your code correctly in if / if else / else clauses.

2
public void Method()
{
    if(something)
    {
        //some code
        if(!something2)
        {
            return;
        }
    }
    // The code i want to go if the second if is true
}
1
public void Method()
{
    if(something)
    {
        //some code
        if(something2)
        {
            // The code i want to go if the second if is true
        }
    return;
    }
}
1

You can return only if !something2 or use else return:

public void Method()
{
    if(something)
    {
        //some code
        if(something2)
        {
            //now I should break from ifs and go to te code outside ifs
        }
        if(!something2) // or else
            return;
    }
    // The code i want to go if the second if is true
}
  • 1
    The only reason to do that instead of simply using an else is if the body of the inner ifcould change something2. – CompuChip Mar 27 '15 at 9:35
  • @CompuChip: good point, so either use !something2 or else. – Tim Schmelter Mar 27 '15 at 9:36
  • You don't even need the first if if it returns when false. Just check if (!something2) and return. The example code is too simple and obviously not his real problem. Unless he's a complete noob...... – kjbartel Mar 27 '15 at 9:45
0

Try adding a control variable:

public void Method()
{
    bool doSomethingElse = true;
    if(something)
    {
        //some code
        if(!something2)
        {
            doSomethingElse = false;
        }
    }
    if(doSomethingElse)
    {
        // The code i want to go if the second if is true
    }
}
0

just want to add another variant to update this wonderful "how to" list. Though, It may be really useful in more complicated cases:

try {
    if (something)
    {
        //some code
        if (something2)
        {
            throw new Exception("Weird-01.");
            // now You will go to the catch statement
        }
        if (something3)
        {
            throw new Exception("Weird-02.");
            // now You will go to the catch statement
        }
        //some code
        return;
    }
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    Console.WriteLine(ex); // you will get your Weird-01 or Weird-02 here
}
// The code i want to go if the second or third if is true
0

I think I know why people would want this. "Run stuff if all conditions are true, otherwise run other stuff". And the conditions are too complicated to put into one if.

Just use a lambda!

if (new Func<bool>(() =>
{
    if (something1)
    {
        if (something2)
        {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
})())
{
    //do stuff
}

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