0

Why is this Application object NOT instantiating? It is null whenever I run the code.

public class Applicant
{
    private Application oApplication = new Application();

    public Applicant()
    { 
        oApplication = new Application();
    }

    public Application Application
    {
        get { return oApplication; }
        set { oApplication = value; }
    }             
}

Here is the Application Class

    public class Application
{
    public string ApplicationID { get; set; }
    public ContactDetails ContactDetails { get; set; }   
}

And here is the calling code....

        public Applicant[] GetApplicants()
    {
        Applicant[] oApplicant;

        DataSet dsExcelSchema = new DataSet();
        dsExcelSchema = GetDataAsDataSet();

        DataTable contactInfoTable = dsExcelSchema.Tables["ContactInformation$"];
        int numOfApplications = contactInfoTable.Rows.Count - 1;
        int i = 0;

        oApplicant = new Applicant[numOfApplications];

        foreach (DataRow dr in contactInfoTable.Rows)
        {
            Application oApplication = new Application();

            oApplicant[i].Application.ApplicationID = dr["ApplicationID"].ToString();
            i++;
        }
        return oApplicant;
    }

It give me a a NullReferenceException.

16
  • 3
    how do you check it is null, how do you use Applicant class? you can delete constructor, btw.
    – nikis
    Commented Mar 27, 2015 at 14:11
  • 1
    Are you getting any exceptions? Are you perhaps swallowing the exceptions? Post the Application class.
    – Craig W.
    Commented Mar 27, 2015 at 14:12
  • 5
    @Thomas: it's absolutely fine to use a type-name for the property-name. Consider you've implemented a custom control which has a Color property that returns it's Color. Commented Mar 27, 2015 at 14:18
  • 2
    @Thomas: i don't see why you would need a property with a name int. That's an alias for a very specific type. It's also a keywod in C#, so you can't use it as property name(for what it's worth, you could use public int @int { get; set; } or public Int32 Int32 { get; set; } ). Commented Mar 27, 2015 at 14:28
  • 1
    On the other side, I actually enjoy using same name for classes and variables/properties.
    – Dusan
    Commented Mar 27, 2015 at 14:28

3 Answers 3

5

You have forgot to create instance of applicant in array element - should be done like this:

foreach (DataRow dr in contactInfoTable.Rows)
{
    oApplicant[i] = new Applicant();
    oApplicant[i].Application.ApplicationID = dr["ApplicationID"].ToString();
    i++;
}
1
  • Thank you. Switching from VB to C# and got led down the wrong trail on that one.
    – TheBigOne
    Commented Mar 27, 2015 at 14:26
3

When you create an array of objects:

oApplicant = new Applicant[numOfApplications];

It will be filled with nulls. So you need to initialize it with real values at first:

for (int i = 0; i < numOfApplications; i++)
{
    oApplicant[i] = new Applicant();
}
6
  • 1
    null is real value Commented Mar 27, 2015 at 14:21
  • 2
    @BinkanSalaryman null means no value. That could be seen as not a real value. Though "instances of the class" would be more precise than "real values" here.
    – juharr
    Commented Mar 27, 2015 at 14:25
  • null is a pointer constant to a forbidden region. In most implementations, if not all, the adress value of null is in fact zero - and that's a real value. Despite that, a variable of a reference type with the value set to null is commonly interpreted as if the variable "has no associated value". Commented Mar 27, 2015 at 14:35
  • 1
    @BinkanSalaryman you are talking about what null technically is, but semantically it is just nothing.
    – nikis
    Commented Mar 27, 2015 at 14:49
  • 1
    @BinkanSalaryman I don't understand the point of your comment. null is nothing semantically, no real value as @juharr said.
    – nikis
    Commented Mar 27, 2015 at 15:02
1

As well as the other answers, you also need to set the numOfApplications to contactInfoTable.Rows.Count, and not contactInfoTable.Rows.Count - 1;

int numOfApplications = contactInfoTable.Rows.Count;

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