5

I'm compiling some C code in Visual C++ 2013 (it has to be written in C).

void drawDebugLines(vec2f pos, DebugControls *controls, vec2f dydx, vec2f p)
{
    static float lineSize = 0.05f;
    if (!controls->normalFlag && !controls->tangentFlag)
    {
        return;
    }
    vec3f nColor = cVec3f(1, 1, 0);
    ...

As-is this code will compile and run just fine.

If I take out those curly braces, I get the following compile error:

error C2275: 'vec3f' : illegal use of this type as an expression

Edit: This error occurs for the statement vec3f nColor

However if I put in a grand total of two semicolons after the return statement (and no braces), the code will also compile and run just fine.

This only happens in Visual C++, gcc will compile this code without requiring the braces or extra semicolon.

My question is why does Visual C++ do this? I'm happy to accept the answer "Visual Studio's C compiler is s***" but why/how is it s***?

I should point out that in my header files I have everything wrapped inside

#if __cplusplus
extern "C" {
#endif
...
#if __cplusplus
}
#endif

I'm not sure if that's relevant but I thought I should mention it just in case.

Edit: code you can just throw into a file and witness the magic:

Extra edit: the extension for the filename must be .c, if it's .cpp then the code compiles.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdbool.h>

typedef struct vec3f vec3f;

struct vec3f
{
    float x, y, z;
};

vec3f cVec3f(float x, float y, float z)
{
    vec3f v;
    v.x = x;
    v.y = y;
    v.z = z;
    return v;
}

void drawDebugLines(vec3f pos, bool debug)
{
    if (!debug)
        return;;

    vec3f nColor = cVec3f(1, 1, 0);

    printf("nColor: %f %f %f\n", nColor.x, nColor.y, nColor.z);
}


int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    vec3f pos = cVec3f(0, 0, 0);
    drawDebugLines(pos, true);

    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

Take out the extra semicolon and watch it break. If it doesn't break for you and it's just my version of Visual C++ that fails then honestly that would make the most sense to me.

  • 1
    Can you create a single file that exhibits this that I could also throw at Visual Studio? If you change all of the vec2f and vec3f to say int, does it still occur? – Bill Lynch Mar 27 '15 at 14:42
  • 1
    This can't be the real code, are you using a macro to return from the function? Also, just move the declaration of vec3f nColor; to the beginning of the function, because AFAIK visual studio c compiler doesn't like to mix declarations with statements, which is a good thing, you shouldn't. In c++ it's different because a declaration might actually invoke the class constructur and in code like yours it would be unnecessary to do that if you are not going to use nColor after all, but in c, there is nothing to worry about. – Iharob Al Asimi Mar 27 '15 at 14:42
  • 1
    I can't get a repro for this from the posted snippet. VS2013 is the first VS version that started supporting C99 syntax, might have something to do with it. Show us a repro that we can compile. – Hans Passant Mar 27 '15 at 14:47
  • 1
    OK, I've thrown in some single-file code where you can just create a quick console project in Visual C++ and watch what happens. If it doesn't break for anyone else then I will actually be very happy. – Blarglenarf Mar 27 '15 at 14:59
  • 1
    Copy-Pasted your shortened version of the code here. GCC compiles the code with/without the second ; without any problems. vc complains when there is one semicolon but compiles fine when there are two semicolons. – Spikatrix Mar 27 '15 at 15:09
6

This was a bug in the C compiler in Visual Studio 2013. It was fixed in Visual Studio 2013 Update 2.

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