8

I need to perform some thread safe operations on List<T>. Usually I just simply use:

lock(List<T>)
{
   List<T>.Add();
   List<T>.Remove();
}

I know there is another way, using ConcurrentBag<T>. But I don't know which is faster, or any other differences.

Edit:

Some people just recommend I use ConcurrentBag, because that's safer. But I worry it will make my operation slower.

I have a lot of threads needing to add or remove objects from a List<T>, I want to know which way is better for performance.

4
  • 6
    Mandatory link to horses - please make sure to update your question with measurements/concrete requirements. Mar 27, 2015 at 17:50
  • 2
    Note that it is recommended to create an object specifically to lock on instead of locking on the shared object or the type (it's not obvious what you are locking on as lock(List<T>) will not even compile).
    – juharr
    Mar 27, 2015 at 17:59
  • 1
    Why not try out a ConcurrentStack or ConcurrentQueue?
    – Gabe
    Mar 27, 2015 at 18:45
  • @Gabe, I thought it's ordered, more slow.
    – qakmak
    Mar 28, 2015 at 16:09

3 Answers 3

11

Don't use ConcurrentBag<T> to replace a locked List<T> unless you're certain of your thread's access patterns because it uses thread local storage under the covers.

MSDN talks about the preferred usage:

"ConcurrentBag<T> is a thread-safe bag implementation, optimized for scenarios where the same thread will be both producing and consuming data stored in the bag."

It's also important to note that List<T> is ordered and ConcurrentBag<T> is unordered. If you don't care about order in your collection I would use a ConcurrentQueue<T>.

Regarding performance, below is some code from ConcurrentBag<T>. But the primary thing to consider is if you do a Take and your thread local storage is empty it will steal from other threads which is expensive.

When it needs to steal, note that it is locking. Also note it can lock several times on one Take since TrySteal can fail and get called more than once from Steal (not shown).

private bool TrySteal(ConcurrentBag<T>.ThreadLocalList list, out T result, bool take)
{
    lock (list)
    {
        if (this.CanSteal(list))
        {
            list.Steal(out result, take);
            return true;
        }
        result = default (T);
        return false;
    }
}

There is also possible spin waiting during CanSteal.

private bool CanSteal(ConcurrentBag<T>.ThreadLocalList list)
{
    if (list.Count <= 2 && list.m_currentOp != 0)
    {
        SpinWait spinWait = new SpinWait();
        while (list.m_currentOp != 0)
            spinWait.SpinOnce();
    }
    return list.Count > 0;
} 

And finally, even adding can cause a lock to be taken.

private void AddInternal(ConcurrentBag<T>.ThreadLocalList list, T item)
{
    bool lockTaken = false;
    try
    {
        Interlocked.Exchange(ref list.m_currentOp, 1);
        if (list.Count < 2 || this.m_needSync)
        {
            list.m_currentOp = 0;
            Monitor.Enter((object) list, ref lockTaken);
        }
        list.Add(item, lockTaken);
    }
    finally
    {
        list.m_currentOp = 0;
        if (lockTaken)
            Monitor.Exit((object) list);
    }
}
7
  • Care to explain the downvote? ConcurrentBag<T> is not a suitable replacement for locking a list.
    – Zer0
    Mar 27, 2015 at 17:55
  • 2
    Why is the use of TLS a concern?
    – Gabe
    Mar 27, 2015 at 17:56
  • 1
    @Gabe Please read msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd997305(v=vs.110).aspx for more information about why TLS is a concern. The main point is if the same thread that is pulling out of the bag is not the same thread that is inserting in to the bag there is a large overhead cost. Mar 27, 2015 at 17:58
  • 3
    The more general advice would probably be: don't attempt multi-threaded code unless you know what you are doing. Someone who does not fully understand what is going on behind the scenes is unlikely to stumble across a solution which improves performance.
    – odyss-jii
    Mar 27, 2015 at 18:09
  • I see how the ConcurrentBag is optimized for same-thread scenarios, but I don't see anything indicating that non-same-thread use would be slow or why use of TLS would be an issue.
    – Gabe
    Mar 27, 2015 at 18:23
11

You can easily measure the performance of different approaches just by trying them out! That is what I just got:

lock list: 2.162s
ConcurrentBag: 7.264s
using System;
using System.Collections.Concurrent;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Linq;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

public class Test
{
    public const int NumOfTasks = 4;
    public const int Cycles = 1000 * 1000 * 4;

    public static void Main()
    {
        var list = new List<int>();
        var bag = new ConcurrentBag<int>();

        Profile("lock list", () => { lock (list) list.Add(1); });
        Profile("ConcurrentBag", () => bag.Add(1));
    }

    public static void Profile(string label, Action work)
    {
        var s = new Stopwatch();
        s.Start();

        List<Task> tasks = new List<Task>();

        for (int i = 0; i < NumOfTasks; ++i)
        {
            tasks.Add(Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
            {
                for (int j = 0; j < Cycles; ++j)
                {
                    work();
                }
            }));
        }

        Task.WaitAll(tasks.ToArray());

        Console.WriteLine(string.Format("{0}: {1:F3}s", label, s.Elapsed.TotalSeconds));
    }
}
1
  • 4
    +1 for actually doing the science, it's interesting to try this example in 2021 on dotnet core 5.0 and get the following completely different results: lock list: 1.681s ConcurrentBag: 0.199s! It seems the dotnet team have been busy optimising the ConcurrentBag Oct 7, 2021 at 12:46
1

List operations add and remove are O(n), meaning that the duration of your lock will depend on how big the list is. The larger your list, the less concurrency you have. However, if you are always adding to the end and removing from the end, you effectively have a stack. In that case the add and remove operations are O(1) and you will have shorter locks.

ConcurrentBag is implemented as a linked list of linked lists (one per thread. Operations add and take are O(1) and do not require a lock in the general case. The fact that locks can usually be avoided means it is likely to be faster.

4
  • 4
    Isn't List.Add O(1)?
    – Dave Zych
    Mar 27, 2015 at 18:23
  • @DaveZych: Yes, but only amortized out over every add. Any given add may take one operation or may take N operations. If you call add 1,048,576 times in a row, the last call will have to do 1,048,576 operations.
    – Gabe
    Mar 27, 2015 at 18:28
  • @DaveZych And again, that's only adding to the end. Adding anywhere else involves moving every item after it in the list, making it O(n) even when it doesn't need to allocate a new backing array.
    – Servy
    Mar 27, 2015 at 18:30
  • 4
    @Servy right, but that would be Insert, I was specifically referencing Add.
    – Dave Zych
    Mar 27, 2015 at 19:43

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.