20

How do you reverse a Python string without omitting the start and end slice arguments?

word = "hello"
reversed_word = word[::-1]

I understand that this works, but how would I get the result by specifying the start and end indexes?

word = "hello"
reversed_word = word[?:?:-1]

It's hard to explain to students why word[::-1] reverses a string. It's better if I can give them logical reasoning rather than "it's the pythonic way".

The way I explain word[::1] is as follows: "You have not specified the start so it just starts from the start. You have not specified the end so it just goes until the end. Now the step is 1 so it just goes from the start to the end 1 character by 1." Now when my students see word[::-1] they are going to think "We have not specified the start or the end so it will go through the string -1 characters at a time?"

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4

From the Python 2 source, this is defined with ternary expressions:

defstart = *step < 0 ? length-1 : 0;
defstop = *step < 0 ? -1 : length;

So, when start and stop are not given,

If step is negative:

  • start is length - 1
  • stop is -1, (this is the C index, tricky to implement in Python, must be -length-1)

If step is positive:

  • start is 0
  • stop is length

So to answer this question:

How would I get the result by specifying the start and end indexes?

To specify this yourself, use e.g. the following (put into a function for reusability)

def my_slice(word, step):
    '''slice word with only step'''
    start = len(word)-1 if step < 0 else 0
    stop = -len(word)-1 if step < 0 else len(word)
    return word[start:stop:step]


word = "hello"
step = -1
my_slice(word, step)

returns

'olleh'
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  • 1
    Can't explain it better than showing the source. Very helpful thanks. – Ogen May 7 '15 at 1:31
15

Some other ways to reverse a string:

word = "hello"
reversed_word1 = word[-1: :-1] 
reversed_word2 = word[len(word)-1: :-1]   
reversed_word3 = word[:-len(word)-1 :-1]    

One thing you should note about the slicing notation a[i:j:k] is that omitting i and j doesn't always mean that i will become 0 and j will become len(s). It depends upon the sign of k. By default k is +1.

  • If k is +ve then the default value of i is 0 (start from the beginning). If it is -ve then the default value of i is -1 (start from the end).
  • If k is +ve then the default value of j is len(s) (stop at the end). If it is -ve then the default value of j is -(len(s)+1) (stop at the beginning).

Now you can explain your students how Hello[::-1] prints olleH.

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  • this would make even more sense if -(len(s)+1) could just be 0. Because that is also the beginning – Ogen Mar 28 '15 at 4:57
  • @Ogen; No. It is actually one past the 0. -len(s) is equivalent to 0. – haccks Mar 28 '15 at 5:01
13

Not quite sure why, but the following will return the reverse of word:

word = "hello"
word[len(word):-(len(word)+1):-1]

Or...

word = "hello"
word[len(word):-len(word)-1:-1]

Edit (Explanation):

From jedward's comment:

The middle parameter is the trickiest, but it's pretty straightforward once you realize (a) negative indices to slice start/stop indicate that you want to count "backwards" from the end of the string, and (b) the stop index is exclusive, so it will "count" up to but stop at/before the stop index. word[len(word):-len(word)-1:-1] is probably more clear.

In response to this comment:

The third value is actually the increment so you are telling Python that you want to start at the last letter then return all the (-1)st values up to the last one.

Here is an drawing (pulled together in a minute): enter image description here

The drawing shows that we can also use this instead:

word = "hello"
word[-1:-len(word)-1:-1] #-1 as the first
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  • 3
    The middle parameter is the trickiest, but it's pretty straightforward once you realize (a) negative indices to slice start/stop indicate that you want to count "backwards" from the end of the string, and (b) the stop index is exclusive, so it will "count" up to but stop at/before the stop index. word[len(word):-len(word)-1:-1] might be a bit clearer. – jedwards Mar 28 '15 at 1:03
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    @jedwards Can I quote you in my answer? – jkd Mar 28 '15 at 1:04
  • 2
    Don't even worry about quoting, just throw it in there :) – jedwards Mar 28 '15 at 1:05
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    @Ogen, there's a good blog post somewhere by Guido van Rossum about how he decided on the slicing notation -- let me dig it up. EDIT: Here: Why Python uses 0-based indexing – jedwards Mar 28 '15 at 1:18
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    @jakekimds Here is a gist that shows one way you could implement the actual slicing, given an iterable (in this case, a string) and a slice object. The last two slices are the ones that might interest you. The second to last slice is the answer you gave ([len(text):-len(text)-1:-1]), the last answer has the same start and stop, but no step. When step isn't provided, it defaults to 1 and the loop tries to count forward, but it's already past the end of the string starting at len(text), so it stops immediately. – jedwards Mar 28 '15 at 2:40
4

If you do not specify a number for slice notation, Python will use None as a default. So, you can just explicitly write the None values:

>>> word = "hello"
>>> word[None:None:-1]
'olleh'
>>>
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  • 5
    I am trying to understand why the answer wouldnt be word[len(word):-1:-1]. To me this reads: "start from the end of the word, and go backwards until you reach -1 and stop". But this doesn't work. – Ogen Mar 28 '15 at 0:57
  • Python doesn't knows that len(word) means "start from the end". Python thinks it is "Start from index that equals to some number". You need to read function definion in manual before using. There first number defined as "start" index. – Alexander R. Mar 28 '15 at 1:01
  • @ogen negative start or end mean to count from the end of the string, not to stop when it goes below 0. – Barmar Mar 28 '15 at 1:04
  • Sorry that was a typo. I meant word[len(word) - 1:-1:-1]. So now the start index is the last index and the end index is -1 because it's exclusive so the last index will be 0. – Ogen Mar 28 '15 at 1:10
  • word[len(word)-1:-1:-1] doesn't mean: "start from the end of the word, and go backwards until you reach -1 and stop". It means that: "Start from -1 and stop when you reach at -1". As for string indices in python, -1 is equivalent to len[string]-1. – haccks Mar 28 '15 at 4:58
3
In [27]: word
Out[27]: 'hello'

In [28]: word[-1:-6:-1]
Out[28]: 'olleh'

Why this works:

In [46]: word
Out[46]: 'hello' 

In [47]: word[-1] # you want o to be your first value
Out[47]: 'o'

In [48]: word[-5] # you want h to be your last value
Out[48]: 'h'

In [49]: word[-1:-6:-1] # therefore ending point should be one
Out[49]: 'olleh'        # past your last value that is -6  
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2

The notation string[begin:end:increment] can be described with the following Python program:

def myreverse( string, begin, end, increment ):
  newstring = ""
  if begin >= 0 and end < 0:
    begin = -1
  for i in xrange(begin, end, increment):
    try:
      newstring += string[i]
    except IndexError:
      pass

  return newstring
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1

Recursive approach:

def reverse(word):
    if len(word) <= 1:
        return word

    return reverse(word[1:]) + word[0]
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  • That works nicely but I'm not looking for a recursive solution. There should be values that I can put into the slice that makes logical sense. – Ogen Mar 28 '15 at 1:00

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