2
Public Class Temperature
        Private dDegrees As Double
        Private dFahrenheit As Double

        Public Enum InputType
            Degrees
            Fahrenheit
        End Enum

        Sub New(ByVal dTemp As Double, eInputType As InputType)
            Select Case eInputType
                Case InputType.Degrees
                    dDegrees = dTemp
                    dFahrenheit = (1.8 * dTemp) + 32
                Case InputType.Fahrenheit
                    dFahrenheit = dTemp
                    dDegrees = (5 / 9) * (dTemp - 32)
            End Select
        End Sub

    ' Properties and methods here

    End Class

Lets say this is the class.

In the main code I want to do something like this.

Dim citytemp As New Temperature(35, Temperature.InputType.Degrees)
Dim value as double
'some code
value = citytemp - 18

I don't want to use something like citytemp.value or citytemp.degrees. I just want to include citytemp and the default value in degrees should be substituted in its place.

Can a class be constructed like this?

I am ok with both VC# or VB

2
5

You can use operator overloading in VB.Net or in C#

Public Shared Operator -(t as Temperature, d as double) As Temperature
    Return New Temperature(t.dDegrees - d)
End Operator
public static Temperature operator-(Temperature t, double d)
{
    return new Temperature(t.dDegrees - d);
}

A couple of other notes:

  • You'll probably want to implement the addition operator also.
  • You may want to implement other interfaces, such as IComparable and IEquatable
  • This would be better implemented as a Structure (vb) or struct (c#)
  • There should only be a single field. Pick which units that field represents, and just store one. The other field should be a property with only a get, which applies the calculation.
  • Note that the math of these operators always assumes a specific unit (Celsius in this case).
  • This type of object is generally known as a value object.

Also note that in your question, you assigned the result to a double, however I gave an example of returning it as a Temperature, which I think makes more sense. If you also wanted it to be assignable to a double, you could add an implicit conversion operation, as Leandro suggested in his answer.

6

In C# you can use implicit and explicit conversion operators. Look it up here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/85w54y0a.aspx

I'm not aware of how it is with VB (or if it is possible), nor the syntax.

In this particular scenario of yours, however, I would refrain from implementing this feature for the Temperature class: it would only introduce confusion to the design and make the code harder to maintain. I think it would be more clear with a syntax like:

value = citytemp.ToCelsius() - 18;
0

You've already got a few answers, but here's how I would implement your example class in C# (using 3 private variables)... I've written a simple console app as a testharness/example for you on how to use it.

There was a (potential) bug in your conversion code due to Double/Integer conversion, I've fixed this for you as well.

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Temperature temp = 100;

        temp.setTempType(Temperature.InputType.Fahrenheit);
        Double theTempinFarenheit = temp.Fahrenheit();

        temp.setTempType(Temperature.InputType.Degrees);
        Double theTempinCelcius = temp.Celcius();

        Double theTempAsJustAValue = (Double)temp;
    }
}

[System.Diagnostics.DebuggerDisplay("{dDegrees}")]
public class Temperature
{
    private double dDegrees;
    private double dCelcius;
    private double dFahrenheit;

    public enum InputType {
        Degrees,
        Fahrenheit
    }

    public Temperature (Double dTemp)
    {
        dDegrees = dTemp;
    }

    public Temperature (Double dTemp, InputType eInputType)
    {
        switch (eInputType)
        {
            case InputType.Degrees:                    
                dDegrees = dTemp;
                dCelcius = dTemp;
                dFahrenheit = (1.8 * dTemp) + 32;
                break;
            case InputType.Fahrenheit:
                dCelcius = dTemp;
                dFahrenheit = dTemp;
                dDegrees = (5.00 / 9.00) * (dTemp - 32);
                break;
            default:
                break;

        }
    }

    public Double setTempType(InputType eInputType)
    {
        switch (eInputType)
        {
            case InputType.Degrees:
                dCelcius = dDegrees;
                dFahrenheit = (1.8 * dDegrees) + 32;
                return dDegrees;                    
            case InputType.Fahrenheit:
                dFahrenheit = dDegrees;
                dCelcius = (5.00 / 9.00) * (dDegrees - 32);
                return dFahrenheit;                    
            default:
                return dDegrees;                    
        }
    }

    public static implicit operator Temperature(Double dTemp)
    {
        return new Temperature(dTemp);
    }

    public static explicit operator Double(Temperature temp)
    {
        return temp.dDegrees;
    }

    public Double Fahrenheit()
    {
        return dFahrenheit;
    }

    public Double Celcius()
    {
        return dCelcius;
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return dDegrees.ToString();
    }
}

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