10

I have this code:

class Patient {

  @Inject Syringe syringe;

  @PostConstruct
  void sayThankyouDoc() {

    System.out.println("That hurt like crazy!");

  }

}

@RunWith(MockitoJUnitRunner.class)
class TestCase {

  @Mock
  Syringe siringeMock;

  @InjectMocks
  Patient patient;

  //...

}

I expected Mockito to call PostConstruct, but I had to add:

@Before
public void simulate_post_construct() throws Exception {
    Method postConstruct = Patient.class.getDeclaredMethod("sayThankyouDoc", null);
    postConstruct.setAccessible(true);
    postConstruct.invoke(patient);
}

Is there a better way to do this?

  • 1
    A different design that is both more readable and easier to test, is to not use @PostConstruct at all, and use constructor injection instead of field injection – geoand Mar 28 '15 at 18:09
  • @geoand but what is constructor injection? – gurghet Mar 28 '15 at 19:08
  • See my answer below – geoand Mar 28 '15 at 20:21
9

Although not a direct answer to your question, however I suggest that you move away from field injection and use constructor injection instead (makes code more readable and testable).

Your code would look like:

class Patient {

  private final Syringe syringe;

  @Inject
  public Patient(Syringe syringe) {
    System.out.println("That hurt like crazy!");
  }

}

Then your test would simply be:

@RunWith(MockitoJUnitRunner.class)
class TestCase {

  @Mock
  Syringe siringeMock;

  Patient patient;

  @Before
  public void setup() {
     patient = new Patient(siringeMock);
  }

}

Update

As suggested by Erik-Karl in the comments, you could use @InjectMocks to get rid of the setup method. The solution works because Mockito will use the appropriate constructor injection (as described here). The code would then look like:

@RunWith(MockitoJUnitRunner.class)
class TestCase {

  @Mock
  Syringe siringeMock;

  @InjectMocks
  Patient patient;

}
  • 1
    This is WAY more testable, thank you doc! – gurghet Mar 28 '15 at 20:34
  • @gurghet Your welcome! – geoand Mar 29 '15 at 10:23
  • 3
    Not only is it more testable, but you get some thread-safety guarantees by having the fields be final. Note that even with the above code, you would need to manually call your @PostConstruct method – NamshubWriter Mar 30 '15 at 4:06
  • 2
    Might be a bit old but I just want to add: InjectMock will inject through constructor if available. So here, you would only have to annotate the Patient with InjectMock and could get rid of the setup method. – Eric-Karl Jan 8 '16 at 16:23
  • @Eric-Karl Very useful! Thanks! I updated the answer with your suggestion – geoand Jan 9 '16 at 13:51

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.