11

I'm wondering what's the difference between for (auto& i : v) and for (auto&& i : v) in a range-based for loop like in this code:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

int main() 
{
    std::vector<int> v = {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5};

    std::cout << "Initial values: ";

    for (auto i : v)    // Prints the initial values
        std::cout << i << ' ';
    std::cout << '\n';

    for (auto i : v)    // Doesn't modify v because i is a copy of each value
        std::cout << ++i << ' ';
    std::cout << '\n';

    for (auto& i : v)   // Modifies v because i is a reference
        std::cout << ++i << ' ';
    std::cout << '\n';

    for (auto&& i : v)  // Modifies v because i is a rvalue reference (Am I right?)
        std::cout << ++i << ' ';
    std::cout << '\n';

    for (const auto &i : v) // Wouldn't compile without the /**/ because i is const
        std::cout << /*++*/i << ' ';
    std::cout << '\n';

}

The output:

Initial values: 0 1 2 3 4 5
1 2 3 4 5 6
1 2 3 4 5 6
2 3 4 5 6 7
2 3 4 5 6 7

Both seem to do the same thing here but I'd like to know what's the difference between for (auto& i : v) and for (auto&& i : v) in this code.

  • 4
    auto uses template argument deduction rules. So auto by itself deduces the type by value, auto& deduces by reference, and auto&& is not an rvalue reference but rather uses reference collapsing rules to deduce the type. – 0x499602D2 Mar 28 '15 at 17:59
  • 2
    Simply put, auto& is an lvalue-reference so it requires an lvalue for its initializer. The elements of the vector can be iterated over as lvalues, so it works. It's also useful when you want to prevent copying each element. This video should explain everything else - vimeo.com/97344493 – 0x499602D2 Mar 28 '15 at 18:17
  • 1
    Yes, that's correct. But if the elements being iterated are rvalues, auto by itself will allow a move. And it can only bind to auto&& because rvalues cannot bind to lvalue-references. – 0x499602D2 Mar 28 '15 at 18:49
  • 1
    @LHLaurini std::vector<bool> is the most notorious example. – T.C. Mar 28 '15 at 19:04
  • 1
    You need a special kind of iterator like what std::vector<bool> has. It can't just be done automatically, even if you do for (auto& x : {1, 2, 3}) the elements are still iterated over as lvalues. – 0x499602D2 Mar 28 '15 at 19:07
2

This answer will probably answer your question, the most relevant part is the following:

auto         => will copy the element, but a reference is more efficient
auto&        => will only bind to modifiable lvalues
const auto&  => will bind to anything but make it const, giving us const_iterator
const auto&& => will bind to rvalues

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.