19

I've created a struct with another struct nested inside of it, like this:

struct Theme {
    var ID: Int
    var name: String
    struct color {
        var tint: String
        var tintDisabled: String
        var accent: String
        var background: String
        var items: [String]
    }
}

I thought I'd be able to address the "tint" item like this:

aTheme.color.tint

But aTheme doesn't have a member "color".

How can I get at it? Or is this just no-go and I should use a different structure?

16

What you've created is a nested typecolor is declared as a type inside the Theme type, so to create an instance of color you would use this notation:

let myColor = Theme.color( ... )

I think instead you want a property of a Theme instance to be a color instance. For this you don't need the types to be nested:

struct Color {
    var tint: String
    var tintDisabled: String
    var accent: String
    var background: String
    var items: [String]
}

struct Theme {
    var ID: Int
    var name: String
    var color: Color
}

Note: Types should always be declared with initial caps.

  • Ah, perfect, that makes lots of sense. Of course Theme doesn't know about Color, since basically no one does. – Matthew Frederick Mar 29 '15 at 7:08
9

Updated: with Swift 3.1 you can use nested type with Struct.

  • 1
    And what a blessing it is! We can now do what the OP wants. This is great for code organisation, clarity, encapsulation. – Womble Apr 2 '17 at 1:24
  • Two years since I asked the question. Woot! It makes so much sense to me, it's hard to understand why it hasn't always been this way. – Matthew Frederick Apr 4 '17 at 22:32
3

maybe like this?

struct Theme {
    var ID: Int
    var name: String  
    var clor = color()
}
struct color {
        var tint: String
        var tintDisabled: String
        var accent: String
        var background: String
        var items: [String]
}

then aTheme.color.tint

  • Just a hair slower. Thank you for the same correct answer. – Matthew Frederick Mar 29 '15 at 7:08

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