117

A bunch of my JavaScript code is in an external file called helpers.js. Inside the HTML that calls this JavaScript code I find myself in need of knowing if a certain function from helpers.js has been called.

I have attempted to create a global variable by defining:

var myFunctionTag = true;

In global scope both in my HTML code and in helpers.js.

Heres what my html code looks like:

<html>
...
<script type='text/javascript' src='js/helpers.js'></script>    
...
<script>
  var myFunctionTag = false;
  ...
  //I try to use myFunctionTag here but it is always false, even though it has been se t to 'true' in helpers.js
</script>

Is what I am trying to do even feasible?

  • 1
    Well, you've just set it to false in the second <script> tag block. I just tried 2 different approaches (without declaring the var before the helpers.js file) and they both worked. I'll post an answer, but it seems there must be some key piece of information missing in your question. – Stephen P May 28 '10 at 22:38
  • window.onload = function () { //Start Your Code } Would the the best solution - And this is Slowpoke speaking :) – Schoening Oct 24 '13 at 20:14
113

You need to declare the variable before you include the helpers.js file. Simply create a script tag above the include for helpers.js and define it there.

<script type='text/javascript' > 
  var myFunctionTag = false; 
</script>
<script type='text/javascript' src='js/helpers.js'></script>     
... 
<script type='text/javascript' > 
  // rest of your code, which may depend on helpers.js
</script>
  • 9
    doesn't work for me because when trying to access from another js loaded in another html, it says the variable is not declared – ACV May 26 '16 at 20:54
16

The variable can be declared in the .js file and simply referenced in the HTML file. My version of helpers.js:

var myFunctionWasCalled = false;

function doFoo()
{
    if (!myFunctionWasCalled) {
        alert("doFoo called for the very first time!");
        myFunctionWasCalled = true;
    }
    else {
        alert("doFoo called again");
    }
}

And a page to test it:

<html>
<head>
<title>Test Page</title>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>
<script type="text/javascript" src="helpers.js"></script>
</head>

<body>


<p>myFunctionWasCalled is
<script type="text/javascript">document.write(myFunctionWasCalled);</script>
</p>

<script type="text/javascript">doFoo();</script>

<p>Some stuff in between</p>

<script type="text/javascript">doFoo();</script>

<p>myFunctionWasCalled is
<script type="text/javascript">document.write(myFunctionWasCalled);</script>
</p>

</body>
</html>

You'll see the test alert() will display two different things, and the value written to the page will be different the second time.

15

OK, guys, here's my little test too. I had a similar problem, so I decided to test out 3 situations:

  1. One HTML file, one external JS file... does it work at all - can functions communicate via a global var?
  2. Two HTML files, one external JS file, one browser, two tabs: will they interfere via the global var?
  3. One HTML file, open by 2 browsers, will it work and will they interfere?

All the results were as expected.

  1. It works. Functions f1() and f2() communicate via global var (var is in the external JS file, not in HTML file).
  2. They do not interfere. Apparently distinct copies of JS file have been made for each browser tab, each HTML page.
  3. All works independently, as expected.

Instead of browsing tutorials, I found it easier to try it out, so I did. My conclusion: whenever you include an external JS file in your HTML page, the contents of the external JS gets "copy/pasted" into your HTML page before the page is rendered. Or into your PHP page if you will. Please correct me if I'm wrong here. Thanx.

My example files follow:

EXTERNAL JS:

var global = 0;

function f1()
{
    alert('fired: f1');
    global = 1;
    alert('global changed to 1');
}

function f2()
{
    alert('fired f2');
    alert('value of global: '+global);
}

HTML 1:

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">
<html>
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1">
<script type="text/javascript" src="external.js"></script>
<title>External JS Globals - index.php</title>
</head>
<body>
<button type="button" id="button1" onclick="f1();"> fire f1 </button>
<br />
<button type="button" id="button2" onclick="f2();"> fire f2 </button>
<br />
</body>
</html>

HTML 2

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">
<html>
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1">
<script type="text/javascript" src="external.js"></script>
<title>External JS Globals - index2.php</title>
</head>
<body>
<button type="button" id="button1" onclick="f1();"> fire f1 </button>
<br />
<button type="button" id="button2" onclick="f2();"> fire f2 </button>
<br />
</body>
</html>
  • 1
    HTML 1 and HTML 2 are identical (except the page title)... still, I made two files, just to have them physically separate. – Martin Jan 2 '13 at 21:55
1

Hi to pass values from one js file to another js file we can use Local storage concept

<body>
<script src="two.js"></script>
<script src="three.js"></script>
<button onclick="myFunction()">Click me</button>
<p id="demo"></p>
</body>

Two.js file

function myFunction() {
var test =localStorage.name;

 alert(test);
}

Three.js File

localStorage.name = 1;
0

I think you should be using "local storage" rather than global variables.

If you are concerned that "local storage" may not be supported in very old browsers, consider using an existing plug-in which checks the availability of "local storage" and uses other methods if it isn't available.

I used http://www.jstorage.info/ and I'm happy with it so far.

0

You can make a json object like:

globalVariable={example_attribute:"SomeValue"}; 

in fileA.js

And access it from fileB.js like: globalVariable.example_attribute

0

//Javascript file 1

localStorage.setItem('Data',10);

//Javascript file 2

var number=localStorage.getItem('Data');

Don't forget to link your JS files in html :)

protected by Mohammad Usman Aug 16 '18 at 18:17

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