4

I want to replace all occurrences of a number with a random number in each line of a file using "sed". For example, if my file has the number 892 in each line, I would like to replace that with a unique random number between 800 and 900.

Input file:-

temp11;djaxfile11;892  
temp12;djaxfile11;892  
temp13;djaxfile11;892  
temp14;djaxfile11;892  
temp15;djaxfile11;892

Expected output file :-

temp11;djaxfile11;805  
temp12;djaxfile11;846  
temp13;djaxfile11;833  
temp14;djaxfile11;881  
temp15;djaxfile11;810

I am trying the below:-

sed -i -- "s/;892/;`echo $RANDOM % 100 + 800 | bc`/g" file.txt

but it is replacing all the occurrences of 892 with a single random number between 800 and 900.

Output file :-

temp11;djaxfile11;821  
temp12;djaxfile11;821  
temp13;djaxfile11;821  
temp14;djaxfile11;821  
temp15;djaxfile11;821

Could you please help in correcting my code ? Thanks in advance.

3
  • Must you absolutely do it in sed? It would be easy in Python or PERL.
    – smci
    Mar 29 '15 at 13:01
  • So your file never has more than 101 lines in it, correct? And the number isn't actually random since it is at least partially determined by the previous lines? Mar 29 '15 at 14:19
  • My file actually has thousands of records. The sed suggestion that Wintermute gave is working perfectly, although it is taking a bit of time. Is awk faster from a performance point of view ? any thoughts ? Mar 29 '15 at 15:15
8

With GNU sed, you could do something like

sed '/;892$/ { h; s/.*/echo $((RANDOM % 100 + 800))/e; x; G; s/892\n// }' filename

...but it would be much saner to do it with awk:

awk -F \; 'BEGIN { OFS = FS } $NF == 892 { $NF = int(rand() * 100 + 800) } 1' filename

To make sure that the random numbers are unique, amend the awk code as follows:

awk -F \; 'BEGIN { OFS = FS } $NF == 892 { do { $NF = int(rand() * 100 + 800) } while(!seen[$NF]++) } 1'

Doing that with sed would be too crazy for me. Be aware that this will only work only if there are less than 100 lines with a last field of 892 in the file.

Explanation

The sed code reads

/;892$/ {                              # if a line ends with ;892
  h                                    # copy it to the hold buffer
  s/.*/echo $((RANDOM % 100 + 800))/e  # replace the pattern space with the
                                       # output of echo $((...))
                                       # Note: this is a GNU extension
  x                                    # swap pattern space and hold buffer
  G                                    # append the hold buffer to the PS
                                       # the PS now contains line\nrandom number
  s/892\n//                            # remove the old field and the newline
}

The awk code is much more straightforward. With -F \;, we tell awk to split the lines at semicolons, then

BEGIN { OFS = FS }  # output field separator is input FS, so the output
                    # is also semicolon-separated
$NF == 892 {        # if the last field is 892
                    # replace it with a random number
  $NF = int(rand() * 100 + 800)
}
1                   # print.

The amended awk code replaces

$NF = int(rand() * 100 + 800)

with

do {
  $NF = int(rand() * 100 + 800)
} while(!seen[$NF]++)

...in other words, it keeps a table of random numbers it has already used and keeps drawing numbers until it gets one it hasn't seen before.

2
  • Thanks a lot ! I tried the sed code you suggested and it worked fine. I will try out the awk options and explore which is the fastest & best way to do it. Mar 29 '15 at 15:16
  • Answered my own (now deleted) questions: (1) awk arrays will accept string keys so this should work for string replacements and (2) if you're getting odd behavior and using the system call, it may be returning the status code and printing (not returning) the output.
    – claytond
    Jul 31 '19 at 18:20

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