15

Thanks for your responses. Yes, I was looking for the weighted average.

rate = [14.424, 14.421, 14.417, 14.413, 14.41]

amount = [3058.0, 8826.0, 56705.0, 30657.0, 12984.0]

I want the weighted average of the top list based on each item of the bottom list.

So, if the first bottom-list item is small (such as 3,058 compared to the total 112,230), then the first top-list item should have less of an effect on the top-list average.

Here is some of what I have tried. It gives me an answer that looks right, but I am not sure if it follows what I am looking for.

for g in range(len(rate)):
    rate[g] = rate[g] * (amount[g] / sum(amount))
rate = sum(rate)

EDIT: After comparing other responses with my code, I decided to use the zip code to keep it as short as possible.

  • 3
    Do you mean weighted average – user648852 Mar 29 '15 at 15:11
  • @Pyson None of these lists seem to have a sum of 100 percent, so I'm not sure about that. – Malik Brahimi Mar 29 '15 at 15:14
  • If you are looking for a weighted average as @Pyson mentioned, a good idea is to normalise the second vector, and apply the w.a algorithm – srj Mar 29 '15 at 15:18
  • I knew weighted average, I just had a brain fart. Thanks – GShocked Mar 29 '15 at 15:19
13
for g in range(len(rate)):
   rate[g] = rate[g] * amount[g] / sum(amount)
rate = sum(rate)

is the same as:

sum(rate[g] * amount[g] / sum(amount) for g in range(len(rate)))

which is the same as:

sum(rate[g] * amount[g] for g in range(len(rate))) / sum(amount)

which is the same as:

sum(x * y for x, y in zip(rate, amount)) / sum(amount)

Result:

14.415602815646439
  • Thanks, this worked. The one highlighted in yellow gave me a syntax error though. – GShocked Mar 29 '15 at 15:41
  • 1
    Are you sure you copied it correctly? – JuniorCompressor Mar 29 '15 at 15:43
  • I tried it again, it worked this time. I probably copied something extra on the page accidentally. I will use your yellow-highlighted code. Thanks! – GShocked Mar 29 '15 at 15:46
19

You could use numpy.average to calculate weighted average.

In [13]: import numpy as np

In [14]: rate = [14.424, 14.421, 14.417, 14.413, 14.41]

In [15]: amount = [3058.0, 8826.0, 56705.0, 30657.0, 12984.0]

In [17]: weighted_avg = np.average(rate, weights=amount)

In [19]: weighted_avg
Out[19]: 14.415602815646439
  • Thanks, but I am trying to use included 2.7.9 libraries. – GShocked Mar 29 '15 at 15:40
7

This looks like a weighted average.

values = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
weights = [2, 8, 50, 30, 10]

s = 0
for x, y in zip(values, weights):
    s += x * y

average = s / sum(weights)
print(average) # 3.38

This outputs 3.38, which indeed tends more toward the values with the highest weights.

1

Let's use python zip function

zip([iterable, ...])

This function returns a list of tuples, where the i-th tuple contains the i-th element from each of the argument sequences or iterables. The returned list is truncated in length to the length of the shortest argument sequence. When there are multiple arguments which are all of the same length, zip() is similar to map() with an initial argument of None. With a single sequence argument, it returns a list of 1-tuples. With no arguments, it returns an empty list.

weights = [14.424, 14.421, 14.417, 14.413, 14.41]
values = [3058.0, 8826.0, 56705.0, 30657.0, 12984.0]
weighted_average = sum(weight * value for weight, value in zip(weights, values)) / sum(weights)
  • 1
    You have the weights and values swapped. I want the 14.000 values to be weighted based on thousand values. – GShocked Mar 29 '15 at 15:27

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