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I was reading for this question: Difference between destructor, dispose and finalize method

I've read that the destructor was used to delete unmanaged resources, but after running a little test :

using System;

namespace Tests
{
    class ImABastardException : Exception 
    {
        public ImABastardException() : base() { }
    }

    class Mouarf
    {
        public Mouarf()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Constructor");
            throw new ImABastardException();
        }

        ~Mouarf()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Destructor");
        }
    }

    class Program
    {
        private static void Func()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Before");
            try
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Try");
                Mouarf m = new Mouarf();
            }
            catch (ImABastardException)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Catch");
            }
            finally
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Finally");
            }
            Console.WriteLine("After");
        }

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("MainBefore");
            Func();
            Console.WriteLine("MainAfter");
            Console.ReadKey();  
        }
    }
}

The result was :

MainBefore
Before
Try
Constructor
Catch
Finally
After
MainAfter   
(I push enter or another key)   
Destructor

I'm afraid that the destructor isn't called when I want (at the end of its range)..

I actually want to create a simple class :

public unsafe class StringArray
{
    private sbyte** pointer;
    private int count;

    public StringArray(string[] array)
    {
        count = array.Length;

        pointer = (sbyte**)Memory.Alloc(count * sizeof(sbyte*));
        for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
        {
            fixed (byte* p = Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(array[i]))
            {
                pointer[i] = (sbyte*)p;
            }
        }
    }

    ~StringArray()
    {
        Memory.Free(pointer);
    }

    public sbyte** Pointer
    {
        get
        {
            return pointer;
        }
    }

    public int Count
    {
        get
        {
            return count;
        }
    }
}

public unsafe class Memory
{
    // see : https://msdn.microsoft.com/fr-fr/library/aa664786%28v=vs.71%29.aspx
}

But I think it would be better to use Dispose for unmanaged resources, what do you think?

Thanks!

Sylafrs.


Edit:

I've had asked that question as an answer to the topic I've given the link above;

Lasse V. Karlsen answered:

"As a quick comment to your actual question, I would implement IDisposable on that type, and have the finalizer call Dispose(false);"

So I've tested:

using System;

namespace Tests
{
    class ImABastardException : Exception 
    {
        public ImABastardException() : base() { }
    }

    class Mouarf: IDisposable
    {
        // Flag: Has Dispose already been called?
        bool disposed = false;

        public Mouarf()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Constructor");
            throw new ImABastardException();
        }

        ~Mouarf()
        {
            Dispose(false);
        }

        public void Dispose()
        {
            Dispose(true);
            GC.SuppressFinalize(this);   
        }

        // Protected implementation of Dispose pattern.
        protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
        {
            if (disposed)
                return;

            if (disposing)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Disposing managed objects");
            }

            Console.WriteLine("Disposing unmanaged objects");
            disposed = true;
        }
    }

    class Program
    {
        private static void Func()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Before");
            Mouarf m = null;
            try
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Try");
                using (m = new Mouarf())
                {
                    ;
                }
            }
            catch (ImABastardException)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Catch");
            }
            finally
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Finally");
            }
            Console.WriteLine("After");
        }

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("MainBefore");
            Func();
            Console.WriteLine("MainAfter");
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }
}

IDisposable doesn't work too.. (the "Disposing unmanaged objects" message was written at the program's end)

I guess the problem comes from the constructor.. Must I use a method to do risky tasks?

  • The destructor just doesn't run when you think it does, "end of scope" has absolutely nothing to do with it. What you see now is the final collection just before the program terminates. Don't use a destructor to solve your problem, whatever it might be. The SafeHandle and SafeBuffer base classes are very good wrappers for unmanaged resources. – Hans Passant Mar 30 '15 at 9:55
  • Thanks :) I don't really have a problem, in fact. I just want to be sure that my resources are destroyed as soon as possible – Sylafrs Mar 30 '15 at 10:17
0

The full example should be:

public unsafe sealed class StringArray : IDisposable
{
    private sbyte** pointer;
    private int count;

    public StringArray(string[] array)
    {
        count = array.Length;

        pointer = (sbyte**)Marshal.AllocCoTaskMem(count * sizeof(sbyte*));

        for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
        {
            fixed (char* p = array[i])
            {
                int len = Encoding.ASCII.GetByteCount(array[i]);
                pointer[i] = (sbyte*)Marshal.AllocCoTaskMem(len + 1); // Zero final byte

                Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(p, array[i].Length, (byte*)pointer[i], len);
                pointer[i][len] = 0; // Final zero
            }
        }
    }

    ~StringArray()
    {
        Dispose();
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        if (pointer != null)
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
            {
                Marshal.FreeCoTaskMem((IntPtr)pointer[i]);
            }

            Marshal.FreeCoTaskMem((IntPtr)pointer);
            pointer = null;
            count = 0;
        }
    }

    public sbyte** Pointer
    {
        get
        {
            return pointer;
        }
    }

    public int Count
    {
        get
        {
            return count;
        }
    }
}

And to use it "correctly" you should write something like:

using (var sa = new StringArray(new[] { "a", "ab", "abc" }))
{

}

Note that the class is sealed, so you don't need to implement the full IDisposable "pattern".

You can't directly use the memory returned by GetBytes, because that is memory handled by the GC. You would need to pin it with GCHandle or write/copy it to a buffer you manually allocated (like I did).

In general the byte is preferred to the sbyte.

I'm adding a zero terminator to the strings, because C strings are built that way. Often in C, "things" like the StringArray are implemented without a Count "property" and the array is terminated with a NULL pointer at the last element, like

public StringArray(string[] array)
{
    pointer = (sbyte**)Marshal.AllocCoTaskMem((array.Length + 1) * sizeof(sbyte*));
    pointer[array.Length] = null;

    for (int i = 0; i < array.Length; i++)
    {
        fixed (char* p = array[i])
        {
            int len = Encoding.ASCII.GetByteCount(array[i]);
            pointer[i] = (sbyte*)Marshal.AllocCoTaskMem(len + 1); // Zero final byte

            Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(p, array[i].Length, (byte*)pointer[i], len);
            pointer[i][len] = 0; // Final zero
        }
    }
}

Then the Count can be implemented like:

public int Count
{
    get
    {
        if (pointer == null)
        {
            return 0;
        }

        int count = 0;

        sbyte** pointer2 = pointer;

        while (*pointer2 != null)
        {
            count++;
            pointer2++;
        }

        return count;
    }
}

I'll add that every memory allocation is "expensive" (both in terms of space, because there is bookkeeping) and in terms of time. If all the strings in the StringArray have the same lifetime, then you could allocate a single block of memory. Clearly this is much more complex to write... But the Dispose() is much easier!

public StringArray(string[] array)
{
    int indexLength = (array.Length + 1) * sizeof(sbyte*);

    // space for null terminator at end of array
    int totalLen = indexLength;

    for (int i = 0; i < array.Length; i++)
    {
        fixed (char* p = array[i])
        {
            int len = Encoding.ASCII.GetByteCount(array[i]);
            totalLen += len + 1; // zero byte at end of string
        }
    }

    pointer = (sbyte**)Marshal.AllocCoTaskMem(totalLen);

    // last element at null
    pointer[array.Length] = null;

    // Memory at the end of the "index" space
    sbyte* pointer2 = (sbyte*)pointer + indexLength;

    // remaining space starting from pointer2
    int remainingLen = totalLen - indexLength;

    for (int i = 0; i < array.Length; i++)
    {
        fixed (char* p = array[i])
        {
            pointer[i] = pointer2;

            int len = Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(p, array[i].Length, (byte*)pointer2, remainingLen);
            pointer2[len] = 0;

            len++; // Zero terminator

            pointer2 += len;
            remainingLen -= len;
        }
    }
}

public void Dispose()
{
    if (pointer != null)
    {
        Marshal.FreeCoTaskMem((IntPtr)pointer);
        pointer = null;
        count = 0;
    }
}
  • Thanks :) I did not know about these alloc/free functions. I thought that GetBytes added the null-character. Why does the byte is preferred to the sbyte? (my C++ parameter type "const char **" has been translated to "sbyte **" in C#) I will search :p Still, I'm not sure if the Dispose method is called (at the end of the object range) if AllocCoTaskMem throws an exception :/ Edit: I've changed char * to unsigned char *. – Sylafrs Mar 30 '15 at 9:50
  • @Sylafrs (GetBytes) doesn't, because the zero terminator is useful only if you interop with C, not in "general" (you could prepend the length of the string to the string, like Pascal strings. No zero terminator needed). I don't know why byte is preferred to sbyte, but if I have to say the truth, when I imagine the cells of a block of memory, or the bytes of a file, I wouldn't ever think that a single byte can be negative :-) If a byte of memory/of a file is 0xFF, it's 255, not -1. Adding a sign means adding a context/a formatting to what you are handling. It is external, not intrinsic. – xanatos Mar 30 '15 at 10:05
  • Okay :) (Anyway, I don't understand why char* has been translated to sbyte*.. I thought char was, by default, unsigned) – Sylafrs Mar 30 '15 at 10:15
  • @Sylafrs stackoverflow.com/a/2054941/613130 For historical reasons, char can be both "signed" or "unsigned" (clearly not at the same time :-) It isn't the schrodinger char). Both ms vc++ and gcc use "signed" char – xanatos Mar 30 '15 at 10:17
  • "If all the strings in the StringArray have the same lifetime, then you could allocate a single block of memory" Yup, I didn't think about that, thanks :) – Sylafrs Mar 30 '15 at 10:21

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