9

I'm trying to determine whether a point is located inside of a polygon or not. I use the following (for Swift modified) algorithm from this website:

func contains(polygon: [Point], test: Point) -> Bool {
    let count = polygon.count
    var i: Int, j: Int
    var contains = false
    for (i = 0, j = count - 1; i < count; j = i++) {
        if ( ((polygon[i].y >= test.y) != (polygon[j].y >= test.y)) &&
            (test.x <= (polygon[j].x - polygon[i].x) * (test.y - polygon[i].y) /
                (polygon[j].y - polygon[i].y) + polygon[i].x) ) {
                    contains = !contains;
        }
    }
    return contains;
}

However, when having a simple polygon with the following coordinates: (x: 0, y: 40), (x: 0, y: 0), (x: 20, y: 0), (x: 20, y: 20), (x: 40, y: 20), (x: 40, y: 40), and check for the point (x: 30, y: 20) the result is true as the if-statement evaluates to true when i and j are 5 and 4 ((x: 40, y: 40) and (x: 40, y: 20)), though the point is only located at the border of the polygon. The function should actually only evaluate true if the point is really located in the polygon. Thanks for any help or improvements/adjustments of the algorithm!

  • While the issue you describe certainly exists, your description of the test case does not look realistic. The condition in if statement does not evaluate to true on point (30, 20) and edge (40, 20)-(40, 40). The ((polygon[i].y >= test.y) != (polygon[j].y >= test.y)) part is already false. (20 >= 20) != (40 >= 20) is false. – AnT Aug 16 '15 at 7:55
  • There's no answer. It's what's called degeneracy.Floating point arithmetic is only so accurate, and so in fact there is a fuzzy border where points may be inside or outside the polygon, depending on how you write the test, even though all ways are mathematically correct. – Malcolm McLean Jan 29 '17 at 17:43
11

If this is for an iOS application, convert your polygon to a UIBezierPath, then use function containtsPoint() to verify if your point in in side that bezierpath

Example (iOS):

func contains(polygon: [CGPoint], test: CGPoint) -> Bool {
        if polygon.count <= 1 {
            return false //or if first point = test -> return true
        }

        var p = UIBezierPath()
        let firstPoint = polygon[0] as CGPoint

        p.moveToPoint(firstPoint)

        for index in 1...polygon.count-1 {
            p.addLineToPoint(polygon[index] as CGPoint)
        }

        p.closePath()

       return p.containsPoint(test)
    }
  • No it's not for an iOS application - however this effort isn't that bad - it would be interesting to know what algorithm the containsPoint() function is using – borchero Mar 30 '15 at 12:32
7
extension MKPolygon {
    func contain(coor: CLLocationCoordinate2D) -> Bool {
        let polygonRenderer = MKPolygonRenderer(polygon: self)
        let currentMapPoint: MKMapPoint = MKMapPointForCoordinate(coor)
        let polygonViewPoint: CGPoint = polygonRenderer.point(for: currentMapPoint)
        return polygonRenderer.path.contains(polygonViewPoint)
    }
}
  • This answer avoids using a MKPolygonRenderer and uses the MKPolygon directly – Moshe Gutman Feb 21 '19 at 16:42
  • MKMapPointForCoordinate(coor) is now MKMapPoint(coor) – Ruben Marin Feb 28 '19 at 12:35
6

Works for me too, so i don't the where is the problem

I've also made a slighted modified version to use swift iterators:

func contains(polygon: [Point], test: Point) -> Bool {

  var pJ=polygon.last!
  var contains = false
  for pI in polygon {
    if ( ((pI.y >= test.y) != (pJ.y >= test.y)) &&
    (test.x <= (pJ.x - pI.x) * (test.y - pI.y) / (pJ.y - pI.y) + pI.x) ){
          contains = !contains
    }
    pJ=pI
  }
  return contains
}

Here are the results with your array sample in playground:

contains(poly,Point(x:40,y:40))   -> true
contains(poly,Point(x:30,y:20))   -> false
contains(poly,Point(x:40,y:20))   -> true
contains(poly,Point(x:1,y:1))     -> true
  • Maybe my question doesn't clarify this - a point lying on the edge of the polygon shouldn't be considered lying inside so (40, 40) should actually evaluate to false. But don't waste time to find another algorithm the more general issue has been resolved using another approach – borchero Jul 26 '15 at 11:06
3

Here is a improved implementation of PNPoly algorithm. I used it and it works fine.

func isPointInsidePolygon(polygon: [CGPoint], test:CGPoint) -> Bool {
 var  i:Int, j:Int = polygon.count - 1
 var  contains = false

 for (i = 0; i < polygon.count; i++) {
    if (((polygon[i].y < test.y && polygon[j].y >= test.y) || (polygon[j].y < test.y && polygon[i].y >= test.y))
        && (polygon[i].x <= test.x || polygon[j].x <= test.x)) {
            contains ^= (polygon[i].x + (test.y - polygon[i].y) / (polygon[j].y - polygon[i].y) * (polygon[j].x - polygon[i].x) < test.x)
    }

    j = i
 }

 return contains
}

for further query check: http://alienryderflex.com/polygon/

0

Here is javascript code (easy to understand, you can rewrite on swift). It works perfectly for me, almost 100%, i.e. great precision.

Your solution have bad precision.

function pointIsInPoly(v, polygon) {
    var edge_error = 1.192092896e-07; // epsilon i.e ~0.000000192
    var x = 0;
    var y = 1;
    var i, j;
    var r = false;
    for (i = 0, j = polygon.length - 1; i < polygon.length; j = i++)
    {
        var pi = polygon[i];
        var pj = polygon[j];
        if (Math.abs(pi[y] - pj[y]) <= edge_error && Math.abs(pj[y] - v[y]) <= edge_error && (pi[x] >= v[x]) != (pj[x] >= v[x]))
        {   
            return true;
        }

        if ((pi[y] > v[y]) != (pj[y] > v[y]))
        {
            var c = (pj[x] - pi[x]) * (v[y] - pi[y]) / (pj[y] - pi[y]) + pi[x];
            if (Math.abs(v[x] - c) <= edge_error)
            {
                return true;
            }
            if (v[x] < c)
            {
                r = !r;
            }
        }
    }
    return r;
}
  • It would be interesting to know why this particular value is chosen for edge_error, and how modifying this value influences the result. – What does "perfectly for me, almost 100%." mean? :) – Martin R Mar 30 '15 at 11:36
  • edge_error - it's epsilon, you can change it to smaller or bigger value, now it's 0.00000011920.. . "almost 100%" - means all solutions for this task have some precision, but this one very accurate. – SAKrisT Mar 30 '15 at 11:41
  • Same problem here... The coordinates from above also result in true – borchero Mar 30 '15 at 11:47

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