2

I can't figure out how to make a type comparison in Swift using the is operator, if the right side is a reference and not a hard-coded type.

For example,

class GmBuilding { }
class GmOffice: GmBuilding { }
class GmFactory: GmBuilding { }

class GmStreet {
    var buildings: [GmBuilding] = []
    func findAllBuildingsOfType(buildingType: GmBuilding.Type) -> [GmBuilding] {
        var result: [GmBuilding] = []
        for building in self.buildings {
            if building is buildingType { // complains that buildingType is not a type
                result.append(building)
            }
        }
        return result
    }
}

let myStreet = GmStreet()
var buildingList: [GmBuilding] = myStreet.findAllBuildingsOfType(GmOffice.self)

It complains that 'buildingType is not a type'. How can it be made to work?

1

4 Answers 4

3

A generic method may do what you want:

func findAllBuildingsOfType<T: GmBuilding>(buildingType: T.Type) -> [GmBuilding] {
    // you can use `filter` instead of  var/for/append
    return buildings.filter { $0 is T }
}

This will work so long as you really do only want to determine the type at compile time:

let myStreet = GmStreet()
let buildingList = myStreet.findAllBuildingsOfType(GmOffice.self)
//   T is set at compile time to GmOffice  --------^

However, often when this question comes up, the follow-up question is, how do I store GmOffice.self in a variable and then have the type be determined at runtime? And that will not work with this technique. But if statically fixed types at compile time are enough for you, this should do it.

2
  • Thanks, this is working and is the solution which best suits my particular problem so far. Thanks for the tip concerning filter usage, btw. And no, the type to send in does, in my case, not need to be determined at runtime.
    – uaknight
    Mar 31, 2015 at 7:07
  • I went with this solution, although it was a close call. Thanks to all who contributed.
    – uaknight
    Apr 1, 2015 at 15:02
2

If AirSpeed Velocity's answer doesn't work for you, you can also accomplish this by bridging to Objective-C.

Make GmBuilding inherit from NSObject:

class GmBuilding: NSObject { }

And use isKindOfClass(_:) to check the type:

for building in self.buildings {
    if building.isKindOfClass(buildingType) {
        result.append(building)
    }
}

Not as Swifty, but it works.

9
  • Thank you for your answer! In my architecture I have a common root class, GmEntity, which all my classes inherit from. Thus, I would have to make that inherit from NSObject in this case, and so all other of my classes will indirectly too. There's currently around 100 of them and I'm only just about 10% into my project. I'm not sure how and how much bridging to obj-c will affect a Swift project, but one of my goals is to trying avoid bridging as much as possible.
    – uaknight
    Mar 31, 2015 at 7:16
  • I tested by making GmEntity inherit from NSObject, and it does work. The solution is actually syntactically simpler and more straightforward than using a generic method. It's a pity Swift's reflection system not yet is as comprehensive as Obj-C's.
    – uaknight
    Mar 31, 2015 at 8:30
  • As far as I can tell there's no significant memory or CPU hit from subclassing NSObject. Mar 31, 2015 at 9:07
  • @AaronBrager there is a slight hit because methods are invoked using the Objective-C message dispatch system, however, it can't be any worse than writing the code in Objective-C in the first place.
    – JeremyP
    Mar 31, 2015 at 10:30
  • @JeremyP Yes. In my brief tests, though, the impact is negligible. Mar 31, 2015 at 11:24
0

I'm sure there must be a better way than this, but it doesn't require inheritance from NSObject and it works at runtime - according to my playground

class GmBuilding { }
class GmOffice: GmBuilding { }
class GmFactory: GmBuilding { }

func thingIs(thing: GmBuilding, #sameTypeAs: GmBuilding) -> Bool
{
    return thing.dynamicType === sameTypeAs.dynamicType
}


var foo: GmOffice = GmOffice()

thingIs(foo, sameTypeAs: GmOffice()) // true
thingIs(foo, sameTypeAs: GmFactory()) // false

The main reason I instantiate an object (you can use a singleton instead) is because I can't figure out how to declare a parameter to be a metatype.

It also doesn't work for

thingIs(foo, sameTypeAs: GmBuilding()) // false :=(
2
  • Yes, I was first also experimenting with 'dynamicType' to find a solution. In some other circumstance I had used it successfully and was hoping it would solve the problem also here. However, your particular solution does not help in my case. I definitely do need the 'is' operator because the code will need to handle also classes which inherit from GmOffice.
    – uaknight
    Mar 31, 2015 at 7:21
  • For example, GmInsuranceOffice: GmOffice and GmBankOffice: GmOffice, should both return true from a call to thingIs(foo, sameTypeAs: GmOffice()). Since I think the '===' operator only will do so for an exact match, it will not work in my case. You didn't know this, sorry, I should have been more specific.
    – uaknight
    Mar 31, 2015 at 7:26
0

As a final resort, using Obj-C reflect function:

import ObjectiveC

func isinstance(instance: AnyObject, cls: AnyClass) -> Bool {
    var c: AnyClass? = instance.dynamicType
    do {
        if c === cls {
            return true
        }
        c = class_getSuperclass(c)
    } while c != nil
    return false
}

class GmBuilding { }
class GmOffice: GmBuilding { }
class GmFactory: GmBuilding { }

isinstance(GmOffice(), GmOffice.self) // -> true
isinstance(GmOffice(), GmFactory.self) // -> false
isinstance(GmOffice(), GmBuilding.self) // -> true

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