2

I'm currently writing my thesis on the use of particle filters for filtering out latent states in stochastic volatility models. To improve the filtering results I've added option prices as an observed process. This means that for a given time series, I have to calculate the option prices at each time step - a "normal" time series is 100-200 points.

Without going too deep into the algorithm, I'm having a serious problem with performance. The last for-loop loops over all of the particles that I use, which is somewhere around a 1,000 (as determined by M). Running this code for only one particle takes 0.25 seconds - which means that it takes around 4 minutes per time step to run using 1,000 particles (which is rather infeasible).

from __future__ import division
import numpy as np
import numexpr as ne
from fftInC import fft
import time
import math
import pyfftw

def HestonCallPrice(M, N, S, V, t, T, strikes, r, param, b, NFFT, inp, v, alphaC, eta, k, weights):
    """
    This will be the pricing function for the European call option. Since we found the 
    quadrature procedure to be too slow we shall move on to use FFT instead. 

    So, we begin defining all of the constants etc. 
    """  

    vT, weightsT, inpJ, vJT = v.T, weights.T, inp * 1j, v.T * 1j

    p1, p2, p3_2, p3, p4 = param[1,:], param[2,:], param[3,:], np.sqrt(param[3,:]), param[4,:]

    """
    Next we move on to the calculations. These have been found to be rather fast, and hence do not
    need any Cythonization.
    """

    gamma = p3_2 / 2

    beta = ne.evaluate("p1 - p4 * p3 * 1j * inp")

    alpha = ne.evaluate("(-inp**2 - inpJ)/2")

    d = ne.evaluate("sqrt(beta**2 - 4 * alpha * gamma)")

    r_pos, r_neg = ne.evaluate("(beta + d)/(2 * gamma)"), ne.evaluate("(beta - d)/(2 * gamma)")

    g, inpJT = ne.evaluate("r_neg / r_pos"), inpJ.T

    D = ne.evaluate("r_neg * (1 - exp( -d * (T - t) ) ) / (1 - g * exp( -d * (T - t) ) )" )

    C = ne.evaluate("p1 * (r_neg*(T - t) - 2 / p3_2 * log( (1 - g*exp(-d*(T - t)))/(1 - g) ) )")

    A = 1j * inp.T * (math.log(S) + r * (T - t))

    C_tmp = (C * p2).T

    """
    The matrices and vectors that are sent into the Cython version of the code are

        A =  (1, 2048)

        C_tmp = (4, 2048)

        D.T = (4, 2048)

        V = (4, 1000)

        vJT[0, :] = (2048,)

        k[:, 0] = (2048,)

        weights.T[0, :] = (2048,)

    This is now where we call the Cython script.
    """

    start = time.time()

    prices = fft(A, float(r), float(t), float(T), C_tmp, D.T, V, float(alphaC), vJT[0, :], k[:, 0],

                 float(b), strikes, float(eta), weights.T[0, :])   

    print 'Cythonized version: ', time.time() - start, ' seconds'

    """
    The below code is the original code which has been "cythonized". 
    """
    start = time.time()

    outPrices = np.empty( (M, N) )

    prices = np.empty( (M * N, len(strikes)) )  

    """
    Regularly I use pyFFTW since it's a bit faster, but I couldn't figure out how to use the C 
    version of this, so to be fair when comparing speeds I disable pyFFTW. However, turning this on
    using the below settings it's 20-30% faster. 
    """
#    fftIn = pyfftw.n_byte_align_empty((N, NFFT), 16, 'complex128')
#    
#    fftOut = fftIn.copy()
#    
#    fft_object = pyfftw.FFTW(fftIn, fftOut, nthreads=8)

    for j in range( len(strikes) ):

        position = (np.log(strikes[j]) + b) / ( 2 * b / NFFT)

        x_1 = np.exp( k[ int(math.floor(position)) ] )

        x_2 = np.exp( k[ int(math.ceil(position)) ] )

        for m in range(M):

            C_m, D_m, V_m = C_tmp[m, :], D[:, m].T, V[m, :][:, np.newaxis]

            F_cT =  ne.evaluate("exp( -r*(T - t) ) * exp(C_m + D_m * V_m + A)  / \
                     ( (alphaC + vJT) * (alphaC + 1 + vJT) )") 

            toFFT = ne.evaluate("exp( b * vJT )  * F_cT * eta / 3 * weightsT")

            price = np.exp( -alphaC * k.T ) / math.pi * np.real ( np.fft.fft(toFFT) )

            y_1 = price[ :, int(math.floor(position)) ]

            y_2 = price[ :, int(math.ceil(position)) ]

            dydx = (y_2 - y_1)/(x_2 - x_1)  

            outPrices[m, :] = dydx * (strikes[j] - x_1) + y_1

        prices[:, j] = outPrices.reshape(M * N)

    print 'Non-cythonized version: ', time.time() - start, ' seconds'

    return prices

" ------ Defining constants etc, nothing to say really -----  "    
M, N, S, t, T, r, NFFT, alphaC = 1, 1000, 1000, 0, 1, 0, 2048, 1.5

strikes = np.array([900, 1100])

c, V = 600, np.random.normal(loc=0.2, scale=0.05, size=(M, N))

param = np.repeat(np.array([0.05, 0.5, 0.15, 0.15**2, 0]), M).reshape((5, M))

eta = c / NFFT

b = np.pi / eta

j = np.arange(1, NFFT+1)[:, np.newaxis]

v, k = eta * (j - 1), -b + 2 * b/ NFFT*(j - 1)

inp = v - (alphaC + 1)*1j

weights = 3 + (-1)**j - np.array([1] + [0]*(NFFT-1))[:, np.newaxis]

" ------------------------------------------------------------- "

HestonCallPrice(M, N, S, V, t, T, strikes, r, param, b, NFFT, inp, v, alphaC, eta, k, weights)

I found that the bottleneck is the last for-loop. I got a tip to rewrite the for-loop in Cython instead, see below

" --------------------------------- C IMPORTED PACKAGES ------------------------------------------ "
from __future__ import division

import cython
cimport cython

import math

cimport numpy as np
import numpy as np

import pyfftw
" ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ "

"""
I heard that the boundscheck and wraparound functions could improve the performance, but I didn't 
notice any performance gain whatsoever.
"""
@cython.profile(False)
@cython.boundscheck(False)
@cython.wraparound(False)
def fft(np.ndarray[double complex, ndim=2] A, float r, float t, float T, 

           np.ndarray[double complex, ndim=2] C, np.ndarray[double complex, ndim=2] D, 

                np.ndarray[double, ndim=2] V, float alphaC, np.ndarray[double complex, ndim=1] vJT, 

                    np.ndarray[double, ndim=1] k, float b, 

                        np.ndarray[long, ndim=1] strikes, float eta,

                                    np.ndarray[long, ndim=1] weightsT):

    cdef int M = V.shape[0]
    cdef int N = V.shape[1]
    cdef int NFFT = D.shape[1]
    cdef np.ndarray[double complex, ndim=1] F_cT
    cdef np.ndarray[double complex, ndim=2] toFFT = np.empty( (N, NFFT), dtype=complex)
    cdef np.ndarray[double, ndim=2] prices
    cdef float x_1, x_2, position
    cdef np.ndarray[double, ndim=1] y_1
    cdef np.ndarray[double, ndim=1] y_2 
    cdef np.ndarray[double, ndim=1] dydx
    cdef int m, j, n
    cdef np.ndarray[double, ndim=2] price = np.empty( (M * N, len(strikes)) )
    cdef np.ndarray[double complex, ndim=1] A_inp = A[0, :]

    for j in range( len(strikes) ):

        position = (math.log(strikes[j]) + b) / ( 2 * b / NFFT)

        x_1 = math.exp ( k[ int(math.floor(position)) ] )
        x_2 = math.exp ( k[ int(math.ceil(position)) ] )

        for m in range(M):

            """
            M is the number of rows we have in A, C, D and V, so we need to loop over all of those.
            """

            for n in range(N):

                """
                Next we loop over all of the elements for each row in V, corresponding to N. For
                us this corresponds to 1000 (if you haven't changed to N in the main program).

                Each of the rows of A, C and D are 2048 in length. So I tried to loop over all of 
                those as well as for each n, but this made the code 4 times slower.
                """

                F_cT = math.exp( -r*(T - t) ) * np.exp (A_inp + C[m, :] + D[m, :] * V[m, n]) / \
                       ( (alphaC + vJT) * (alphaC + 1 + vJT) )

                toFFT[n, :] = np.exp (b * vJT) * F_cT * eta / 3 * weightsT

            """
            I'm guessing FFT'ing is rather slow using NumPy in Cython?
            """

            prices = np.exp ( -alphaC * k ) / math.pi * np.real ( np.fft.fft(toFFT) )

            y_1 = prices[ :, int(math.floor(position)) ]
            y_2 = prices[ :, int(math.ceil(position)) ]

            dydx = (y_2 - y_1)/(x_2 - x_1)  

            price[m * N:(m + 1) * N, j] = dydx * (strikes[j] - x_1) + y_1

    return price

I'm compiling the code as

from distutils.core import setup, Extension
from Cython.Distutils import build_ext
import numpy.distutils.misc_util

include_dirs = numpy.distutils.misc_util.get_numpy_include_dirs()


setup(
  name = 'fftInC',
  ext_modules = [Extension('fftInC', ['fftInC.pyx'], include_dirs=include_dirs)],
  cmdclass = {'build_ext':build_ext}
)

But to my surprise, the Cython version is about 3x slower than the original one. And I can't really figure out where I'm going wrong. I think I've defined the input types correctly (which I understand should give a considerable performance boost).

My question is therefore: Can you identify where I'm going wrong? Is it the type definition, for-loops or FFT'ing (or something else)?

  • 4
    The cython code is still calling a lot of python and numpy code - math.exp, np.pi, np.exp, floor, ceil, indexing. I would suggest experimenting with small pieces of code, ones where the inner calculations (of the loops) are simple math, things that can be translated to fast C code (without external calls). – hpaulj Mar 30 '15 at 19:23
  • Thanks for the quick reply! Okay! How would you suggest that I take the exponential? Do you think that I can speed up this algorithm using C considerably? Or should I just go with the original code? – Tingiskhan Mar 30 '15 at 19:40
  • Before you start trying to re-write everything in Cython you really need to start out by profiling your numpy code (e.g. using line_profiler). Identify where the bottlenecks are first, then think about whether it's worth trying to write these sections in Cython. Cython is mainly useful for speeding up operations that can't be vectorized (e.g. code that requires a bunch of nested for loops). At first glance, there doesn't seem to be much code here that fits that description. – ali_m Mar 30 '15 at 19:45
  • 1
    I had made a rookie mistake looping over strikes when I'm performing the same calculations independent of the index in strikes. So I adjusted that, resulting in a considerable speedboost, especially since I use 4-6 options (what took 600 seconds now takes 100). But, if someone can actually figure out how to speed up the F_cT line I'm all ears. – Tingiskhan Mar 31 '15 at 10:19
  • 2
    A good chunk of those lines (everything that doesn't depend on m and n) can be factored out and done once earlier. That's math.exp( -r*(T - t) ) / ( (alphaC + vJT) * (alphaC + 1 + vJT) ) on the first line and np.exp (b * vJT) *eta / 3 * weightsT on the second line. I don't have a real feeling for how much benefit that will give. – DavidW Mar 31 '15 at 19:17

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.