16

I am trying to persist a java object having java.util.Date field in mongo collection using fasterxml jackson. The problem is the default nature of objectMapper is to store Date as NumberLong type.

For e.g , a createdTime field of java.util.Date type gets stored as below:

"createdTime" : NumberLong("1427728445176")

I want to store it in ISODate format which is available in mongo Shell.

Now, i know there is way to format object mapper to store Date in a String dateformat. But I am ONLY looking for ISODate() format.

For e.g "createdTime" : ISODate("2015-01-20T16:39:42.132Z")

Is there a way to do that ? Please advise gurus . Thanks in advance for help.

16

What you need is the Jackson Joda Module. If you import that into your classpath, you can do the following on your mapper to write it as your desired Timestamp:

ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
mapper.registerModule(new JodaModule());
mapper.configure(SerializationFeature.WRITE_DATES_AS_TIMESTAMPS, true);
mapper.writeValueAsString(date);

You can replace date in the code sample above with your POJO as necessary.

Edit: It looks like what you really want is a custom serializer. That would look something like this:

public class IsoDateSerializer extends JsonSerializer<DateTime> {
    @Override
    public void serialize(DateTime value, JsonGenerator jgen, SerializerProvider provider) {
        String isoDate = ISODateTimeFormat.dateTime().print(value);
        jgen.writeRaw("ISODATE(\"" + isoDate + "\")");
    }

Then you'll either register it on the mapper for all DateTime types

mapper.addSerializer(DateTime.class, new IsoDateSerializer());

or specify it on the function using annotations

@JsonSerializer(using = IsoDateSerializer.class)
public DateTime createdTime;
  • 1
    Thanks @xathien . I already tried this approach earlier.But with this approach, it essentially creates a String. For e.g , after altering my code for mapper as below ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper(); mapper.registerModule(new JodaModule()); mapper.configure(com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.SerializationFeature.WRITE_DATES_AS_TIMESTAMPS , false); The output is as below "createdTime":"2015-03-30T19:33:08.921Z". I was looking for something like below format. "createdTime" : ISODate("2015-01-20T16:39:42.132Z") Or am i missing something ? – vishy Mar 30 '15 at 19:38
  • Thank @xathien. I updated the post with my answer but accepted your reply as answer , since it pointed me in right direction :) – vishy Apr 2 '15 at 1:02
  • @xathien Hey isn't it @JsonSerialize not @JsonSerializer? – Naruto Sempai Feb 22 '18 at 1:14
  • Yep, but the edit would be too small for SO to accept. :) – xathien Feb 22 '18 at 2:58
8

I was able to serialize the date string to ISODate format. I wrote a customer date serializer like below.

public void serialize(Date date, JsonGenerator jgen, SerializerProvider provider) throws IOException {
    String dateValue = getISODateString(date);
    String text = "{ \"$date\" : \""+   dateValue   +"\"}";
    jgen.writeRawValue(text);
}

Based on request from user @mmx73, I am adding code for customer Date DeSeriaizer.

public class IsoDateDeSerializer extends JsonDeserializer<Date> {

    @Override
    public Date deserialize(JsonParser jsonParser, DeserializationContext deserializationContext)
            throws IOException, JsonProcessingException {
        ObjectCodec oc = jsonParser.getCodec();
        JsonNode node = oc.readTree(jsonParser);
        String dateValue = node.get("$date").asText();

        //DateFormat df = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ss'Z'");
        DateFormat df = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ss.SSS'Z'");
        Date date = null;
        try {
             date = df.parse(dateValue);
        } catch (ParseException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }

        return date;
    }
}
  • Rather than hardcoding the {}s and such, I'd recommend using the JsonGenerator functions writeStartObject(), writeFieldName(), then the writeRawValue(). Otherwise, glad to help! – xathien Apr 2 '15 at 2:31
  • 1
    @vishy : Thanks god, i was getting mad about this. Most solutions are able to serialize and deserialitze Dates but in MongoDB is was stored as String or Int64. Both does not help much whenn adding a TTL index. 2 thumbs up. – mmx73 Feb 7 '16 at 22:20
  • 1
    Glad it's useful to you. – vishy Feb 8 '16 at 0:56
  • @vishy: did you figure out how to deserialize the date correct when you read the JSON from the mongoDB ? Maybe you want to update your answer :-) – mmx73 Feb 8 '16 at 16:43
  • 1
    @vishy : After a discussion with the admins in a duplicate question to this one, i would recommend that you mark your answer as the accepted (correct) answer as the other one is neither complete nor correct. just my 2cts. – mmx73 Feb 10 '16 at 12:12
3

None of these answers accomplished what I wanted. I was having trouble because when I serialized the JSON string to MongoDB, it was stored as a String. A nicely formatted string, but a string none the less.

I use the com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.ObjectMapper to convert my objects to/from JSON and I wanted to continue using this class. I have the following method:

public enum JsonIntent {NONE, MONGODB};
public static ObjectMapper getMapper(final JsonIntent intent) {

    ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
    // Setting to true saves the date as NumberLong("1463597707000")
    // Setting to false saves the data as "2016-05-18T19:30:52.000+0000"

    mapper.configure(SerializationFeature.WRITE_DATES_AS_TIMESTAMPS, false);
    mapper.registerModule(new JodaModule());

    if (intent == JsonIntent.MONGODB) {
        // If you want a date stored in MONGO as a date, then you must store it in a way that MONGO
        // is able to deal with it.
        SimpleModule testModule = new SimpleModule("MyModule", new Version(1, 0, 0, null, null, null));

        testModule.addSerializer(Date.class, new StdSerializer<Date>(Date.class) {
            private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;

            @Override
            public void serialize(Date value, JsonGenerator jgen, SerializerProvider provider) throws IOException {
                try {
                    if (value == null) {
                        jgen.writeNull();
                    } else {
                        jgen.writeStartObject();
                        jgen.writeFieldName("$date");
                        String isoDate = ISODateTimeFormat.dateTime().print(new DateTime(value));
                        jgen.writeString(isoDate);
                        jgen.writeEndObject();
                    }
                } catch (Exception ex) {
                    Logger.getLogger(JsonUtil.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, "Couldn't format timestamp " + value + ", writing 'null'", ex);
                    jgen.writeNull();
                }
            }
        });

        testModule.addDeserializer(Date.class, new StdDeserializer<Date>(Date.class) {
            private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;

            @Override
            public Date deserialize(JsonParser jp, DeserializationContext dc) throws IOException, JsonProcessingException {
                JsonNode tree = jp.readValueAsTree();
                SimpleDateFormat dateFormat = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ssZ");
                try {
                    return ISODateTimeFormat.dateTime().parseDateTime(tree.get("$date").textValue()).toDate();
                } catch (Throwable t) {
                    throw new IOException(t.getMessage(), t);
                }
            }

        });

        mapper.registerModule(testModule);
    }

    return mapper;
}

Now, I can run the following test code:

BObjectMapper mapper = getMapper(JsonUtil.JsonIntent.NONE);
Date d1 = new Date();
String v = mapper.writeValueAsString(d1);
System.out.println("Joda Mapping: " + v);
Date d2 = mapper.readValue(v, Date.class);
System.out.println("Decoded Joda: " + d2);

mapper = getMapper(JsonUtil.JsonIntent.MONGODB);
v = mapper.writeValueAsString(d1);
System.out.println("Mongo Mapping: " + v);
d2 = mapper.readValue(v, Date.class);
System.out.println("Decoded Mongo: " + d2);

The output is as follows:

Joda Mapping: "2016-06-13T14:58:11.937+0000"
Decoded Joda: Mon Jun 13 10:58:11 EDT 2016
Mongo Mapping: {"$date":"2016-06-13T10:58:11.937-04:00"}
Decoded Mongo: Mon Jun 13 10:58:11 EDT 2016

Note that the JSON that will be sent to MONGODB defines the value containing a field named "$date". This tells MongoDB that this is a date object it seems.

When I look at Mongo, I see the following:

"importDate" : ISODate("2016-05-18T18:55:07Z")

Now, I can access the field as a date rather than as a string.

To add an encoded JSON string to Mongo, my code is as follows:

MongoDatabase db = getDatabase();
Document d = Document.parse(json);
db.getCollection(bucket).insertOne(d);

In this case, "json" is the encoded JSON string. Because it is coming from a JSON string, it has no way of knowing the types unless it infers this, which is why we needed the "$date" portion. The "bucket" is just a string indicating which table to use.

As a side note, I found out that if I pull a BSON object from Mongo and convert it to a JSON string by calling doc.toJson() (where doc is of type org.bison.Document as returned from a query), the date object is stored with a long value rather than a formatted text string. I did not check to see if I could push data into mongo after formatting in this way, but, you can modify the deserializer shown above to support this as follows:

    testModule.addDeserializer(Date.class, new StdDeserializer<Date>(Date.class) {
    private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;

    @Override
    public Date deserialize(JsonParser jp, DeserializationContext dc) throws IOException, JsonProcessingException {
        JsonNode tree = jp.readValueAsTree();
        SimpleDateFormat dateFormat = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ssZ");
        try {
            // Mongo will return something that looks more like:
            // {$date:<long integer for milliseconds>}
            // so handle that as well.
            JsonNode dateNode = tree.get("$date");
            if (dateNode != null) {
                String textValue = dateNode.textValue();
                if (!Util.IsNullOrEmpty(textValue)) {
                    return ISODateTimeFormat.dateTime().parseDateTime(textValue).toDate();
                }
                return Util.MillisToDate(dateNode.asLong());
            }
            return null;
        } catch (Throwable t) {
            Util.LogIt("Exception: " + t.getMessage());
            throw new IOException(t.getMessage(), t);
        }
    }

});

You can convert milliseconds to a Date or DateTime as follows:

    /**
 * Convert milliseconds to a date time. If zero or negative, just return
 * null.
 *
 * @param milliseconds
 * @return
 */
public static Date MillisToDate(final long milliseconds) {
    if (milliseconds < 1) {
        return null;
    }
    Calendar calendar = Calendar.getInstance();
    calendar.setTimeInMillis(milliseconds);
    return calendar.getTime();
}

public static DateTime MillisToDateTime(final long milliseconds) {
    if (milliseconds < 1) {
        return null;
    }
    return new DateTime(milliseconds);
}
1

In case you get some message like

com.fasterxml.jackson.core.JsonGenerationException: Can not write a field name, expecting a value.

Make sure you use writeRawValue instead within the accepted answer. That ends the field correctly, otherwise the next field to be serialize may throw this error.

0

You can solve this issue by reading/writing bson instead of json. Here is a test class:

package com.nagra.jongo.mapper;

import com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.ObjectMapper;
import com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.module.SimpleModule;
import de.undercouch.bson4jackson.BsonFactory;
import de.undercouch.bson4jackson.deserializers.BsonDateDeserializer;
import de.undercouch.bson4jackson.serializers.BsonDateSerializer;
import org.junit.Assert;
import org.junit.Before;
import org.junit.Test;

import java.io.IOException;
import java.util.Date;

/**
 * Uses Bson4Jackson 2.9.0
 *
 * <!-- https://mvnrepository.com/artifact/de.undercouch/bson4jackson -->
 * <dependency>
 *     <groupId>de.undercouch</groupId>
 *     <artifactId>bson4jackson</artifactId>
 *     <version>2.9.2</version>
 * </dependency>
 */
public class ObjectMapperTest {

private ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper(new BsonFactory());

private static class WrappedDate {
    private Date Date = new Date(0);

    public WrappedDate() {
    }

    public Date getDate() {
        return Date;
    }

    public void setDate(Date Date) {
        this.Date = Date;
    }
}

@Before
public void setUp() {
    SimpleModule module = new SimpleModule();
    module.addSerializer(Date.class, new BsonDateSerializer());
    module.addDeserializer(Date.class, new BsonDateDeserializer());
    mapper.registerModule(module);
}

@Test
public void testDate() throws IOException {
    WrappedDate date = new WrappedDate();
    byte[] b = mapper.writeValueAsBytes(date);
    WrappedDate i = mapper.readValue(b, WrappedDate.class);
    Assert.assertEquals(date.getDate(), i.getDate());
    System.out.println(i.getDate());
}}

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