3

I have the following scenario:

  1. Client who is requesting a webservice to start

    public bool Start(MyProject project, string error)
    
  2. A web service who receives the call from the client in a method

    public event EventHandler<StartEventArgs> startEvent;
    
    public bool Start(MyProject project, string error)
    {
        Task<bool> result = StartAsync(project, error);
    
        return result.Result;
    }
    
    protected virtual void OnStart(StartEventArgs e)
    {
        // thread safe trick, snapshot of event
        var se = startEvent;
        if (se != null)
        {
            startEvent(this, e);
        }
    }
    
    private Task<bool> StartAsync(MyProject project, string error)
    {
        var taskCompletion = new TaskCompletionSource<bool>();
    
        this.startEvent += (p, e) => taskCompletion.TrySetResult((e.Error == string.Empty) ? true : false);
    
        this.OnStart(new StartEventArgs(project, error));
    
        return taskCompletion.Task;
    }
    
  3. An application that is subscribing to an event that is located in the web service:

    app.Start += EventHandler(App_Start)
    
    private bool App_Start()
    {
       // does something
       returns true/false
    }
    
  4. I want the web service to fire off the event in a Task, then wait for the function in the app.exe to finish and then return here to notify the user that the task has completed successfully.

I am not sure how to do this but in theory it would look something like this:

Task<bool> startTask = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => { OnStart() });
startTask.WaitAll(); // I think this is what I would need to for 4.0
return startTask.Result

I hope I am being descriptive enough for someone to see what I am trying to do. I would like the service to not have to know anything about the client and just run the task and once the event has finished its execution come back to this point and return to client a Boolean value representing success/failure.

Is this possible or am I taking a really wrong approach with this?

Update: Obviously OnStart is not an event so how do I do what you are trying to explain to me?

3

You can wrap an event describing the Event based asynchronous pattern into an Task<T> via TaskCompletionSource<T>. The basic pattern is typically something like:

Task<bool> StartAsync()
{
    var tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<bool>();

    // When the event returns, set the result, which "completes" the task
    service.OnStarted += (o,e) => tcs.TrySetResult(e.Success);

    // If an error occurs, error out the task (optional)
    service.OnStartError += (o,e) => tcs.TrySetException(e.Exception);

    // Start the service call
    service.Start();

    // Return the Task<T>
    return tcs.Task;
}
  • Is the code above on the App.exe side for this scenario? – ShaffDaddy Mar 30 '15 at 20:50
  • Nevermind, I just realized (or so I think I did) where this should be :) – ShaffDaddy Mar 30 '15 at 20:52
  • I am going to edit my code so you can see what I am trying to do, I am still a little confused on how to use TaskCompletionSource – ShaffDaddy Mar 30 '15 at 21:01
  • 2
    It's going to depend on the situation, but often when implementing this pattern it's important to remove the handlers after the task is completed. At least, if the events ever fire multiple times, or if the object firing the events will outlive this method by a fair bit of time. – Servy Mar 30 '15 at 21:10
  • @Servy how to remove the handlers in a pattern like this? – axa Aug 8 '18 at 16:22
1

So I think I am now understanding how this needs to be done here is how I am doing it now.

Service code:

public void SetStartTask(Task<bool> startTask)
        {
            this.startTask = startTask;
        }

public bool Start(RtProjectInfo project, string error)
        {
            StartEventArgs args = new StartEventArgs(project, error);

            OnStart(args);

            return startTask.Result;
        }

protected virtual void OnStart(StartEventArgs e)
        {
            // thread safe trick, snapshot of event
            var se = startEvent;

            if (se != null)
            {
                startEvent(this, e);
            }
        }

public void StartFinished(MyProject project, string error)
        {
            OnStartFinish(new StartEventArgs(project, error));
        }

protected virtual void OnStartFinish(StartEventArgs e)
            {
                var sef = startFinished;

                if (sef != null)
                {
                    startFinished(this, e);
                }
            }

Here is a test client implementation

public void Start_Event(object sender, StartEventArgs e)
        {
            Task<bool> startTask = StartAsync();

            service.SetStartTask(startTask);

            DoOtherWork();
            DoOtherWork();
            DoOtherWork();
        }

private Task<bool> StartAsync()
        {
            var taskCompletion = new TaskCompletionSource<bool>();

            service.startFinished += (p, e) => 
            {
                taskCompletion.TrySetResult((e.Error == string.Empty) ? true : false); 
            };

            return taskCompletion.Task;
        }

private void DoingWork()
        {
            for(int i = 0; i < 100; ++i)
            {

            }

            service.StartFinished(project, error);
        }

        private void DoOtherWork()
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < 100000; ++i)
            {                    
            }
        }

So obviously whenever someone client calls DoingWork() the event will be received and everyone is happy! If anyone has any suggestions that are better please provide them as I am just learning how to use TPL correctly.

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