5

I have recently seen several recommendations stating that Thread.Sleep should never be used in production code (most recently in this SO question). Many of these advocate for using Task.Delay instead. Most of the explanations I've found use UI applications as examples, since the advantages to Task.Delay are obvious (not blocking the UI).

In my case, I am using Thread.Sleep inside of a wait loop that polls a WCF service for a particular condition, like this:

DateTime end = DateTime.UtcNow + TimeSpan.FromMinutes(2);
while (DateTime.UtcNow < end)
{
    if (ExternalServiceIsReady() == true)
    {
        return true;
    }
    Thread.Sleep(1000);
}

In this case, the following potential advantages of Task.Delay seem not to apply:

  • The sleep time is fairly large relative to the typical timer resolution of around 15 ms, so the increase in accuracy of Task.Delay seems trivial.
  • The process is single-threaded (non-UI) and must block until the condition is true, so using await has no advantage here.
  • The ability to cancel the delay is not required.

Is this a case where it is appropriate to use Thread.Sleep? What would be the advantage (if any) of replacing my sleep line with Task.Delay(1000).Wait()?

11
  • 2
    What does ExternalServiceIsReady do ? Maybe Sleep/Delay can be completely avoided.
    – EZI
    Mar 30, 2015 at 20:59
  • 2
    Is there an option C to use an event? It might be more appropriate than this polling approach. Mar 30, 2015 at 21:01
  • 1
    Option D is the superior solution, a Timer. Mar 30, 2015 at 22:06
  • 1
    @HansPassant Can you elaborate on why a Timer is a superior solution?
    – BJ Myers
    Mar 30, 2015 at 22:18
  • 1
    No loop, no thread, no sleep. Mar 30, 2015 at 22:26

1 Answer 1

7

There's never an advantage in replacing Thread.Sleep(1000); in Task.Delay(1000).Wait();. If you want to wait synchronously just use Thread.Sleep.

If you really only have a single thread and planning to keep it that way, then you can use Thread.Sleep. However, I would still use Task.Delay as it's preferable in most cases and so it's a good pattern. I would only block at very top when you can't use async anymore, and even then I would suggest using some kind of AsyncContext.

You can also use a System.Threading.Timer directly* instead of Task.Delay however you should keep in mind that the timer executes every interval and doesn't wait for the actual operation to complete, so if ExternalServiceIsReady takes more than the interval you can have multiple calls to that service concurrently.

An even better solution would be to replace the polling of the external service with an asynchronous operation so the service can notify you when it's ready instead of you asking it every second (that isn't always possible as it depends on the service):

await ExternalServiceIsReadyAsync();

* Task.Delay uses a System.Threading.Timer internally which also has a resolution of ~15ms.

11
  • 2
    And a more better way would be if ExternalServiceIsReady can throw an event that way there would be no need for sleep/wait.
    – EZI
    Mar 30, 2015 at 22:07
  • @EZI That's asynchronous.
    – i3arnon
    Mar 30, 2015 at 22:08
  • And what? doesn't it loop and sleep? What does asynchronous call change here? You only involve another task here.
    – EZI
    Mar 30, 2015 at 22:09
  • 1
    @i3arnon For your last comment: Thread.Sleep doesn't waste any cpu cycle. It keeps a usable resource(thread) hanging around, but no cpu cycles spent. Do you mean that while loop and those conditions? Mar 31, 2015 at 18:16
  • 2
    Another nitpick. Task.Delay creates a Task(memory allocation), task.Wait() will spin for certain amount of time and task.Wait() will allocate a Kernel event after that point (kernel resource and user-> kernel transition) all of which is gonna take cpu cycles :) Mar 31, 2015 at 18:48

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