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I mean that a binary search tree is a tree where the left child is smaller and right child is greater/equal to than the parent.

A threaded binary tree has threads. How does this makes it different?

  • You can have a threaded binary search tree. Any binary tree can be threaded. The advantage of threading a binary search tree is that you can easily traverse forward and backwards from any node. That's very difficult to do with a non-threaded BST. – Jim Mischel Mar 31 '15 at 17:59
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In threaded binary trees, the leaves, which would have null references are replaced with references to the in-order successor (in case of right childs) or predecessor (in case of left childs) nodes. If only successor or predecessor references are used, then the tree is single threaded, if both, then it is double threaded. This makes the in-order traversal of nodes computationally cheaper.

This image (borrowed from Wikipedia) show the data structure nicely:

enter image description here

Please refer to the Wikipedia article for more information.

  • So, if I am to guess I think that Threaded binary tree's leaf nodes do not point to null but a valid node(or to say that there is no leaf node?) while in a Binary search tree leaf nodes point to null. – user4275686 Mar 31 '15 at 7:01
  • "A binary tree is threaded by making all right child pointers that would normally be null point to the inorder successor of the node" This answers your question :) – meskobalazs Mar 31 '15 at 7:07
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    In threaded binary trees, there is always a _direct_ pointer to the in-order successor and/or predecessor element. - No, not necessarily. (In the diagram, B has no direct pointer to C.) – greybeard Mar 31 '15 at 14:48
  • You are right, made an update. I hope I made no mistakes this time. – meskobalazs Mar 31 '15 at 14:57
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Comparing the two concepts is sort of like comparing apples and buffalo. :) A binary search tree is a special case of a binary search tree, in which the elements satisfy the ordering you mention--everything in the left subtree must be less than the root node, and everything in the right subtree must be greater. A threaded tree doesn't have any such restrictions, and in fact a threaded tree doesn't have to have data in the nodes that can be compared with an ordering relationship. In fact, a binary search tree is a concept that has nothing inherently to do with how the tree is implemented, while a threaded tree is only about how trees are implemented--i.e. how you set up the pointers in the tree nodes. A binary search tree can be a threaded tree if you decide to implement it that way.

  • Can you mention a few uses of each? Why would I want to have a threaded tree? Any advantage that something 'else' doesn't provide? – user4275686 Mar 31 '15 at 6:54
  • Sorry, StackOverflow is a place for questions and answers, not questions and entire book chapters. I'm afraid you're asking too much here. – ajb Mar 31 '15 at 6:58
  • Actually I am trying to make sure that they are entirely different and not related in any way , as you proclaimed. – user4275686 Mar 31 '15 at 6:59
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Here thread does not means another parallel execution stack. It means pointers to next and previous elements for each node of the tree.

See explanation on Wikipedia.

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Wiki says "A binary tree is threaded by making all right child pointers that would normally be null point to the inorder successor of the node (if it exists), and all left child pointers that would normally be null point to the inorder predecessor of the node."

You would normally do that, so you could find the inorder successor of a node quickly (given the node) rather than traversing and until the main and maintaining successor every time while traversing.

While you are right for binary search tree, Nodes to the left are going to be smaller than parent while nodes to right are going to be greater than parent.

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Threaded Binary Tree Article in Wikipedia

"A binary tree is threaded by making all right child pointers that would normally be null point to the inorder successor of the node (if it exists), and all left child pointers that would normally be null point to the inorder predecessor of the node."

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