124

I am creating a DataFrame from a csv as follows:

stock = pd.read_csv('data_in/' + filename + '.csv', skipinitialspace=True)

The DataFrame has a date column. Is there a way to create a new DataFrame (or just overwrite the existing one) which only contains rows with date values that fall within a specified date range or between two specified date values?

267

There are two possible solutions:

  • Use a boolean mask, then use df.loc[mask]
  • Set the date column as a DatetimeIndex, then use df[start_date : end_date]

Using a boolean mask:

Ensure df['date'] is a Series with dtype datetime64[ns]:

df['date'] = pd.to_datetime(df['date'])  

Make a boolean mask. start_date and end_date can be datetime.datetimes, np.datetime64s, pd.Timestamps, or even datetime strings:

mask = (df['date'] > start_date) & (df['date'] <= end_date)

Select the sub-DataFrame:

df.loc[mask]

or re-assign to df

df = df.loc[mask]

For example,

import numpy as np
import pandas as pd

df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.random((200,3)))
df['date'] = pd.date_range('2000-1-1', periods=200, freq='D')
mask = (df['date'] > '2000-6-1') & (df['date'] <= '2000-6-10')
print(df.loc[mask])

yields

            0         1         2       date
153  0.208875  0.727656  0.037787 2000-06-02
154  0.750800  0.776498  0.237716 2000-06-03
155  0.812008  0.127338  0.397240 2000-06-04
156  0.639937  0.207359  0.533527 2000-06-05
157  0.416998  0.845658  0.872826 2000-06-06
158  0.440069  0.338690  0.847545 2000-06-07
159  0.202354  0.624833  0.740254 2000-06-08
160  0.465746  0.080888  0.155452 2000-06-09
161  0.858232  0.190321  0.432574 2000-06-10

Using a DatetimeIndex:

If you are going to do a lot of selections by date, it may be quicker to set the date column as the index first. Then you can select rows by date using df.loc[start_date:end_date].

import numpy as np
import pandas as pd

df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.random((200,3)))
df['date'] = pd.date_range('2000-1-1', periods=200, freq='D')
df = df.set_index(['date'])
print(df.loc['2000-6-1':'2000-6-10'])

yields

                   0         1         2
date                                    
2000-06-01  0.040457  0.326594  0.492136    # <- includes start_date
2000-06-02  0.279323  0.877446  0.464523
2000-06-03  0.328068  0.837669  0.608559
2000-06-04  0.107959  0.678297  0.517435
2000-06-05  0.131555  0.418380  0.025725
2000-06-06  0.999961  0.619517  0.206108
2000-06-07  0.129270  0.024533  0.154769
2000-06-08  0.441010  0.741781  0.470402
2000-06-09  0.682101  0.375660  0.009916
2000-06-10  0.754488  0.352293  0.339337

While Python list indexing, e.g. seq[start:end] includes start but not end, in contrast, Pandas df.loc[start_date : end_date] includes both end-points in the result if they are in the index. Neither start_date nor end_date has to be in the index however.


Also note that pd.read_csv has a parse_dates parameter which you could use to parse the date column as datetime64s. Thus, if you use parse_dates, you would not need to use df['date'] = pd.to_datetime(df['date']).

  • Setting the date column as the index works well, but it's not clear from the documentation I've seen that one can do that. Thanks. – Faheem Mitha Mar 16 at 20:32
  • @FaheemMitha: I added a link above to where "partial string indexing" is documented. – unutbu Mar 16 at 21:04
  • The part that is perhaps less clear is that an index has to be explicitly created. And without explicitly creating the index, a restricted range returns an empty set, not an error. – Faheem Mitha Mar 16 at 21:36
  • After the df = df.set_index(['date']) step, I have found the index also needs to be sorted (via df.sort_index(inplace=True, ascending=True)), as otherwise you can get less than full or even empty DataFrame results from df.loc['2000-6-1':'2000-6-10']. And if you use ascending=False, that won't work at all, even if you reverse it with df.loc['2000-6-10':'2000-6-1'] – bgoodr Mar 22 at 16:24
33

I feel the best option will be to use the direct checks rather than using loc function:

df = df[(df['date'] > '2000-6-1') & (df['date'] <= '2000-6-10')]

It works for me.

Major issue with loc function with a slice is that the limits should be present in the actual values, if not this will result in KeyError.

18

You can use the isin method on the date column like so df[df["date"].isin(pd.date_range(start_date, end_date))]

Note: This only works with dates (as the question asks) and not timestamps.

Example:

import numpy as np   
import pandas as pd

# Make a DataFrame with dates and random numbers
df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.random((30, 3)))
df['date'] = pd.date_range('2017-1-1', periods=30, freq='D')

# Select the rows between two dates
in_range_df = df[df["date"].isin(pd.date_range("2017-01-15", "2017-01-20"))]

print(in_range_df)  # print result

which gives

           0         1         2       date
14  0.960974  0.144271  0.839593 2017-01-15
15  0.814376  0.723757  0.047840 2017-01-16
16  0.911854  0.123130  0.120995 2017-01-17
17  0.505804  0.416935  0.928514 2017-01-18
18  0.204869  0.708258  0.170792 2017-01-19
19  0.014389  0.214510  0.045201 2017-01-20
15

You can also use between:

df[df.some_date.between(start_date, end_date)]
4

In case if you are going to do this frequently the best solution would be to first set the date column as index which will convert the column in DateTimeIndex and use the following condition to slice any range of dates.

import pandas as pd

data_frame = data_frame.set_index('date')

df = data_frame[(data_frame.index > '2017-08-10') & (data_frame.index <= '2017-08-15')]
1

I prefer not to alter the df.

An option is to retrieve the index of the start and end dates:

import numpy as np   
import pandas as pd

#Dummy DataFrame
df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.random((30, 3)))
df['date'] = pd.date_range('2017-1-1', periods=30, freq='D')

#Get the index of the start and end dates respectively
start = df[df['date']=='2017-01-07'].index[0]
end = df[df['date']=='2017-01-14'].index[0]

#Show the sliced df (from 2017-01-07 to 2017-01-14)
df.loc[start:end]

which results in:

     0   1   2       date
6  0.5 0.8 0.8 2017-01-07
7  0.0 0.7 0.3 2017-01-08
8  0.8 0.9 0.0 2017-01-09
9  0.0 0.2 1.0 2017-01-10
10 0.6 0.1 0.9 2017-01-11
11 0.5 0.3 0.9 2017-01-12
12 0.5 0.4 0.3 2017-01-13
13 0.4 0.9 0.9 2017-01-14
0

With my testing of pandas version 0.22.0 you can now answer this question easier with more readable code by simply using between.

# create a single column DataFrame with dates going from Jan 1st 2018 to Jan 1st 2019
df = pd.DataFrame({'dates':pd.date_range('2018-01-01','2019-01-01')})

Let's say you want to grab the dates between Nov 27th 2018 and Jan 15th 2019:

# use the between statement to get a boolean mask
df['dates'].between('2018-11-27','2019-01-15', inclusive=False)

0    False
1    False
2    False
3    False
4    False

# you can pass this boolean mask straight to loc
df.loc[df['dates'].between('2018-11-27','2019-01-15', inclusive=False)]

    dates
331 2018-11-28
332 2018-11-29
333 2018-11-30
334 2018-12-01
335 2018-12-02

Notice the inclusive argument. very helpful when you want to be explicit about your range. notice when set to True we return Nov 27th of 2018 as well:

df.loc[df['dates'].between('2018-11-27','2019-01-15', inclusive=True)]

    dates
330 2018-11-27
331 2018-11-28
332 2018-11-29
333 2018-11-30
334 2018-12-01

This method is also faster than the previously mentioned isin method:

%%timeit -n 5
df.loc[df['dates'].between('2018-11-27','2019-01-15', inclusive=True)]
868 µs ± 164 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 5 loops each)


%%timeit -n 5

df.loc[df['dates'].isin(pd.date_range('2018-01-01','2019-01-01'))]
1.53 ms ± 305 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 5 loops each)

However, it is not faster than the currently accepted answer, provided by unutbu, only if the mask is already created. but if the mask is dynamic and needs to be reassigned over and over, my method may be more efficient:

# already create the mask THEN time the function

start_date = dt.datetime(2018,11,27)
end_date = dt.datetime(2019,1,15)
mask = (df['dates'] > start_date) & (df['dates'] <= end_date)

%%timeit -n 5
df.loc[mask]
191 µs ± 28.5 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 5 loops each)

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