65

I have the date of several events expressed in milliseconds[1], and I want to know which events are inside the current week and the current month, but I can't figure out how to obtain the first day (day/month/year) of the running week and convert it to milliseconds, the same for the first day of the month.

[1]Since January 1, 1970, 00:00:00 GMT
  • let's see some code ... – miku May 30 '10 at 0:29
  • 7
    How to get the first day of the month? It's the one numbered 1... – Michael Mrozek May 30 '10 at 0:36
  • Yeah, but how to get the name of the 1st day of the month? – Goran Horia Mihail Feb 11 '14 at 19:39

13 Answers 13

143

This week in milliseconds:

// get today and clear time of day
Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
cal.set(Calendar.HOUR_OF_DAY, 0); // ! clear would not reset the hour of day !
cal.clear(Calendar.MINUTE);
cal.clear(Calendar.SECOND);
cal.clear(Calendar.MILLISECOND);

// get start of this week in milliseconds
cal.set(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK, cal.getFirstDayOfWeek());
System.out.println("Start of this week:       " + cal.getTime());
System.out.println("... in milliseconds:      " + cal.getTimeInMillis());

// start of the next week
cal.add(Calendar.WEEK_OF_YEAR, 1);
System.out.println("Start of the next week:   " + cal.getTime());
System.out.println("... in milliseconds:      " + cal.getTimeInMillis());

This month in milliseconds:

// get today and clear time of day
Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
cal.set(Calendar.HOUR_OF_DAY, 0); // ! clear would not reset the hour of day !
cal.clear(Calendar.MINUTE);
cal.clear(Calendar.SECOND);
cal.clear(Calendar.MILLISECOND);

// get start of the month
cal.set(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH, 1);
System.out.println("Start of the month:       " + cal.getTime());
System.out.println("... in milliseconds:      " + cal.getTimeInMillis());

// get start of the next month
cal.add(Calendar.MONTH, 1);
System.out.println("Start of the next month:  " + cal.getTime());
System.out.println("... in milliseconds:      " + cal.getTimeInMillis());
  • also need clear am_pm for start of a day cal.clear(Calendar.AM_PM); – keshin Oct 23 '12 at 6:58
  • @keshin: True. I replaced the lines cal.clear(Calendar.HOUR_OF_DAY); with cal.set(Calendar.HOUR_OF_DAY, 0); like instructed in the javadoc of Calendar. – COME FROM Dec 21 '12 at 6:41
  • 1
    @COMEFROM why do you suggest to use clear?whats the benefit if i use and what error would I expect If I dont use? – SpringLearner Feb 11 '15 at 10:57
  • @SpringLearner: Days and weeks and months all begin and end at midnight. However, Calendar.getInstance does not usually return a Calendar instance pointing to a midnight (00:00:00.000). So, to find out a beginning or the end of a day (or a week or a month), resetting the time of the day is needed. – COME FROM Feb 11 '15 at 12:28
  • @COMEFROM even I do not clear then also it worked so just interested why you made it – SpringLearner Feb 11 '15 at 12:29
23

The first day of week can be determined with help of java.util.Calendar as follows:

Calendar calendar = Calendar.getInstance();
calendar.clear();
calendar.setTimeInMillis(timestamp);
while (calendar.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK) > calendar.getFirstDayOfWeek()) {
    calendar.add(Calendar.DATE, -1); // Substract 1 day until first day of week.
}
long firstDayOfWeekTimestamp = calendar.getTimeInMillis();

The first day of month can be determined as follows:

Calendar calendar = Calendar.getInstance();
calendar.clear();
calendar.setTimeInMillis(timestamp);
while (calendar.get(Calendar.DATE) > 1) {
    calendar.add(Calendar.DATE, -1); // Substract 1 day until first day of month.
}
long firstDayOfMonthTimestamp = calendar.getTimeInMillis();

Pretty verbose, yes.


Java 7 will come with a much improved Date and Time API (JSR-310). If you can't switch yet, then you can as far use JodaTime which makes it all less complicated:

DateTime dateTime = new DateTime(timestamp);
long firstDayOfWeekTimestamp = dateTime.withDayOfWeek(1).getMillis();

and

DateTime dateTime = new DateTime(timestamp);
long firstDayOfMonthTimestamp = dateTime.withDayOfMonth(1).getMillis();
  • 1
    Thanks a lot, I'm on development of my first Android app, on a completely new world, the world of Java, and i'd never heard about joda but i'm not sure about joda+android. Thanks again! – cesarlinux May 30 '10 at 1:55
  • 1
    You're welcome. Using JodaTime is just a matter of downloading the JAR and placing it in the classpath. As with every other "3rd party" library. – BalusC May 30 '10 at 2:19
  • @cesar, where do you state in the question or in the tags that this is for Android? – Paul Tomblin May 30 '10 at 10:32
  • 2
    Though keep in mind that jodatime may turn your 30kb app into a 300kb app. – flodin May 30 '10 at 10:54
  • Good answer. I suggest also passing a DateTimeZone object to the DateTime constructor rather than implicitly rely on the JVM’s current default time zone to be assigned. – Basil Bourque Oct 21 '14 at 17:02
13

java.time

The java.time framework in Java 8 and later supplants the old java.util.Date/.Calendar classes. The old classes have proven to be troublesome, confusing, and flawed. Avoid them.

The java.time framework is inspired by the highly-successful Joda-Time library, defined by JSR 310, extended by the ThreeTen-Extra project, and explained in the Tutorial.

Instant

The Instant class represents a moment on the timeline in UTC.

The java.time framework has a resolution of nanoseconds, or 9 digits of a fractional second. Milliseconds is only 3 digits of a fractional second. Because millisecond resolution is common, java.time includes a handy factory method.

long millisecondsSinceEpoch = 1446959825213L;
Instant instant = Instant.ofEpochMilli ( millisecondsSinceEpoch );

millisecondsSinceEpoch: 1446959825213 is instant: 2015-11-08T05:17:05.213Z

ZonedDateTime

To consider current week and current month, we need to apply a particular time zone.

ZoneId zoneId = ZoneId.of ( "America/Montreal" );
ZonedDateTime zdt = ZonedDateTime.ofInstant ( instant , zoneId );

In zoneId: America/Montreal that is: 2015-11-08T00:17:05.213-05:00[America/Montreal]

Half-Open

In date-time work, we commonly use the Half-Open approach to defining a span of time. The beginning is inclusive while the ending in exclusive. Rather than try to determine the last split-second of the end of the week (or month), we get the first moment of the following week (or month). So a week runs from the first moment of Monday and goes up to but not including the first moment of the following Monday.

Let's the first day of the week, and last. The java.time framework includes a tool for that, the with method and the ChronoField enum.

By default, java.time uses the ISO 8601 standard. So Monday is the first day of the week (1) and Sunday is last (7).

ZonedDateTime firstOfWeek = zdt.with ( ChronoField.DAY_OF_WEEK , 1 ); // ISO 8601, Monday is first day of week.
ZonedDateTime firstOfNextWeek = firstOfWeek.plusWeeks ( 1 );

That week runs from: 2015-11-02T00:17:05.213-05:00[America/Montreal] to 2015-11-09T00:17:05.213-05:00[America/Montreal]

Oops! Look at the time-of-day on those values. We want the first moment of the day. The first moment of the day is not always 00:00:00.000 because of Daylight Saving Time (DST) or other anomalies. So we should let java.time make the adjustment on our behalf. To do that, we must go through the LocalDate class.

ZonedDateTime firstOfWeek = zdt.with ( ChronoField.DAY_OF_WEEK , 1 ); // ISO 8601, Monday is first day of week.
firstOfWeek = firstOfWeek.toLocalDate ().atStartOfDay ( zoneId );
ZonedDateTime firstOfNextWeek = firstOfWeek.plusWeeks ( 1 );

That week runs from: 2015-11-02T00:00-05:00[America/Montreal] to 2015-11-09T00:00-05:00[America/Montreal]

And same for the month.

ZonedDateTime firstOfMonth = zdt.with ( ChronoField.DAY_OF_MONTH , 1 );
firstOfMonth = firstOfMonth.toLocalDate ().atStartOfDay ( zoneId );
ZonedDateTime firstOfNextMonth = firstOfMonth.plusMonths ( 1 );

That month runs from: 2015-11-01T00:00-04:00[America/Montreal] to 2015-12-01T00:00-05:00[America/Montreal]

YearMonth

Another way to see if a pair of moments are in the same month is to check for the same YearMonth value.

For example, assuming thisZdt and thatZdt are both ZonedDateTime objects:

boolean inSameMonth = YearMonth.from( thisZdt ).equals( YearMonth.from( thatZdt ) ) ;

Milliseconds

I strongly recommend against doing your date-time work in milliseconds-from-epoch. That is indeed the way date-time classes tend to work internally, but we have the classes for a reason. Handling a count-from-epoch is clumsy as the values are not intelligible by humans so debugging and logging is difficult and error-prone. And, as we've already seen, different resolutions may be in play; old Java classes and Joda-Time library use milliseconds, while databases like Postgres use microseconds, and now java.time uses nanoseconds.

Would you handle text as bits, or do you let classes such as String, StringBuffer, and StringBuilder handle such details?

But if you insist, from a ZonedDateTime get an Instant, and from that get a milliseconds-count-from-epoch. But keep in mind this call can mean loss of data. Any microseconds or nanoseconds that you might have in your ZonedDateTime/Instant will be truncated (lost).

long millis = firstOfWeek.toInstant().toEpochMilli();  // Possible data loss.

About java.time

The java.time framework is built into Java 8 and later. These classes supplant the troublesome old legacy date-time classes such as java.util.Date, Calendar, & SimpleDateFormat.

To learn more, see the Oracle Tutorial. And search Stack Overflow for many examples and explanations. Specification is JSR 310.

The Joda-Time project, now in maintenance mode, advises migration to the java.time classes.

You may exchange java.time objects directly with your database. Use a JDBC driver compliant with JDBC 4.2 or later. No need for strings, no need for java.sql.* classes.

Where to obtain the java.time classes?

11

Attention!

while (calendar.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK) > calendar.getFirstDayOfWeek()) {
    calendar.add(Calendar.DATE, -1); // Substract 1 day until first day of week.
}

is good idea, but there is some issue: For example, i'm from Ukraine and calendar.getFirstDayOfWeek() in my country is 2 (Monday). And today is 1 (Sunday). In this case calendar.add not called.

So, correct way is change ">" to "!=":

while (calendar.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK) != calendar.getFirstDayOfWeek()) {...
2

To get the first day of the month, simply get a Date and set the current day to day 1 of the month. Clear hour, minute, second and milliseconds if you need it.

private static Date firstDayOfMonth(Date date) {
   Calendar calendar = Calendar.getInstance();
   calendar.setTime(date);
   calendar.set(Calendar.DATE, 1);
   return calendar.getTime();
}

First day of the week is the same thing, but using Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK instead

private static Date firstDayOfWeek(Date date) {
   Calendar calendar = Calendar.getInstance();
   calendar.setTime(date);
   calendar.set(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK, 1);
   return calendar.getTime();
}
  • Can you give any suggestions on how to extract all days of the week where the selected date is present in? – Rigorous implementation Nov 13 '13 at 10:04
2

I have created some methods for this:

public static String catchLastDayOfCurrentWeek(String pattern) {
    Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
    cal.set(Calendar.HOUR_OF_DAY, 0);
    cal.clear(Calendar.MINUTE);
    cal.clear(Calendar.SECOND);
    cal.clear(Calendar.MILLISECOND);

    cal.set(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK, cal.getFirstDayOfWeek());

    return calendarToString(cal, pattern);
}

public static String catchLastDayOfCurrentWeek(String pattern) {
    Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
    cal.set(Calendar.HOUR_OF_DAY, 0);
    cal.clear(Calendar.MINUTE);
    cal.clear(Calendar.SECOND);
    cal.clear(Calendar.MILLISECOND);

    cal.set(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK, cal.getFirstDayOfWeek());

    cal.add(Calendar.WEEK_OF_YEAR, 1);
    cal.add(Calendar.MILLISECOND, -1);

    return calendarToString(cal, pattern);
}

public static String catchTheFirstDayOfThemonth(Integer month, pattern padrao) {
    Calendar cal = GregorianCalendar.getInstance();
    cal.setTime(new Date());
    cal.set(Calendar.MONTH, month);
    cal.set(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH, 1);

    return calendarToString(cal, pattern);
}

public static String catchTheLastDayOfThemonth(Integer month, String pattern) {
    Calendar cal = GregorianCalendar.getInstance();
    cal.setTime(new Date());
    cal.set(cal.get(Calendar.YEAR), month, cal.getActualMaximum(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH));

    return calendarToString(cal, pattern);
}

public static String calendarToString(Calendar calendar, String pattern) {
    if (calendar == null) {
        return "";
    }
    SimpleDateFormat format = new SimpleDateFormat(pattern, LocaleUtils.DEFAULT_LOCALE);
    return format.format(calendar.getTime());
}

You can see more here.

1

In this case:

// get today and clear time of day
Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
cal.clear(Calendar.HOUR_OF_DAY);  <---- is the current hour not 0 hour
cal.clear(Calendar.MINUTE);
cal.clear(Calendar.SECOND);
cal.clear(Calendar.MILLISECOND);

So the Calendar.HOUR_OF_DAY returns 8, 9, 12, 15, 18 as the current running hour. I think will be better change such line by:

c.set(Calendar.HOUR_OF_DAY,0);

this way the day always begin at 0 hour

1

Get First date of next month:-

SimpleDateFormat df = new SimpleDateFormat("MM-dd-yyyy");
String selectedDate="MM-dd-yyyy like 07-02-2018";
Date dt = df.parse(selectedDate);`enter code here`
calendar = Calendar.getInstance();
calendar.setTime(dt);
calendar.set(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH, calendar.getActualMaximum(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH) + 1);

String firstDate = df.format(calendar.getTime());
System.out.println("firstDateof next month ==>" + firstDate);
0

You should be able to convert your number to a Java Calendar, e.g.:

 Calendar.getInstance().setTimeInMillis(myDate);

From there, the comparison shouldn't be too hard.

0
import java.text.SimpleDateFormat;
import java.util.Calendar;
import java.util.GregorianCalendar;
import java.util.Scanner;

/**
This Program will display day for, 1st and last days in a given month and year

@author Manoj Kumar Dunna
Mail Id : manojdunna@gmail.com
*/
public class DayOfWeek {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String strDate = null;
        int  year = 0, month = 0;
        Scanner sc = new Scanner(System.in);
        System.out.print("Enter YYYY/MM: ");
        strDate = sc.next();
        Calendar cal = new GregorianCalendar();
        String [] date = strDate.split("/");
        year = Integer.parseInt(date[0]);
        month = Integer.parseInt(date[1]);
        cal.set(year, month-1, 1);
        System.out.println(new SimpleDateFormat("EEEE").format(cal.getTime()));
        cal.add(Calendar.MONTH, 1);
        cal.add(Calendar.DAY_OF_YEAR, -1);
        System.out.println(new SimpleDateFormat("EEEE").format(cal.getTime()));
    }
}
0
Simple Solution:
package com.util.calendarutil;

import java.text.DateFormat;
import java.text.ParseException;
import java.text.SimpleDateFormat;
import java.util.Calendar;
import java.util.Date;
import java.util.GregorianCalendar;

public class CalUtil {
    public static void main(String args[]){
        DateFormat df = new SimpleDateFormat("dd/mm/yyyy");
        Date dt = null;
        try {
            dt = df.parse("23/01/2016");
        } catch (ParseException e) {
            System.out.println("Error");
        }

        Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
        cal.setTime(dt);
        cal.set(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK, cal.getFirstDayOfWeek());
        Date startDate = cal.getTime();
        cal.add(Calendar.DATE, 6);
        Date endDate = cal.getTime();
        System.out.println("Start Date:"+startDate+"End Date:"+endDate);


    }

}
-1

i use this trick to get the first day of the current month note the order is 1 for Sunday 2 for Monday 3 for Tuesday .... and so on

Calendar cal = new GregorianCalendar();
int startDay = cal.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_YEAR) % 7 + 1;
System.out.println(startDay);
  • 1
    FYI, the troublesome date-time classes such as java.util.Date, java.util.Calendar, and java.text.SimpleDateFormat are now legacy, supplanted by the java.time classes. Most of the java.time functionality is back-ported to Java 6 & Java 7 in the ThreeTen-Backport project. Further adapted for earlier Android (<26) in ThreeTenABP. See How to use ThreeTenABP…. – Basil Bourque Jun 10 at 1:27
  • I don’t think you’re answering the question. Maybe a different question. – Ole V.V. Jun 10 at 4:44
  • It also doesdn’t work. Running your code today, Wednesday, I got 3, which according to you should be for Tuesday. – Ole V.V. Jun 12 at 13:37
-4
public static void main(String[] args) {
    System.out.println(getMonthlyEpochList(1498867199L,12,"Monthly"));

}

public static Map<String,String> getMonthlyEpochList(Long currentEpoch, int noOfTerms, String timeMode) {
    Map<String,String> map = new LinkedHashMap<String,String>();
    int month = 0;
    while(noOfTerms != 0) {
        Calendar calendar = Calendar.getInstance();         
        calendar.add(Calendar.MONTH, month);
        calendar.set(Calendar.DATE, calendar.getActualMinimum(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH));
        Date monthFirstDay = calendar.getTime();
        calendar.set(Calendar.DATE, calendar.getActualMaximum(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH));
        Date monthLastDay = calendar.getTime();
        map.put(getMMYY(monthFirstDay.getTime()), monthFirstDay + ":" +monthLastDay);
        month--;
        noOfTerms--;
    }
    return map;     
}

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