5

I'm pretty new to python and I'm looking for a way to sort a list placing words before numbers.

I understand you can use sort to do the following :

a = ['c', 'b', 'd', 'a']
a.sort()
print(a)
['a', 'b', 'c', 'd']

b = [4, 2, 1, 3]
b.sort()
print(b)
[1, 2, 3, 4]

c = ['c', 'b', 'd', 'a', 4, 2, 1, 3]
c.sort()
print(c)
[1, 2, 3, 4, 'a', 'b', 'c', 'd']

However I'd like to sort c to produce :

['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 1, 2, 3, 4]

Thanks in advance

  • 3
    Warning: your third example will not work in Python 3. Instead, you'll get TypeError: unorderable types: int() < str(). – Kevin Mar 31 '15 at 16:37
8

You could provide a custom key argument which gives a lower value to strings than it does to ints:

>>> c = ['c', 'b', 'd', 'a', 4, 2, 1, 3]
>>> c.sort(key = lambda item: ([str,int].index(type(item)), item))
>>> c
['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 1, 2, 3, 4]
  • 2
    [0, 1][type(item) == int] – thefourtheye Mar 31 '15 at 16:44
  • Fails with IndexError if there is a type other than str or int in the list. – dawg Mar 31 '15 at 18:08
  • @dawg, true. If you want more types, you can add them to the [str, int] list. Or you could even replace it with lambda item: ({str:0, int:1}.get(type(item), 2), item) and just let all non-string non-ints sort to the right. – Kevin Mar 31 '15 at 18:12
  • 2
    The is not consistent with Python's polymorphism: you should allow any object that behaves like an int to be treated like one, instead of mandating that it be one by using type -- use isinstance instead to allow derived classes to be treated consistently. – the wolf Mar 31 '15 at 18:50
4

The default Python sort is asciibetical

Given:

>>> c = ['c', 'b', 'd', 'a', 'Z', 0, 4, 2, 1, 3]

the default sort is:

>>> sorted(c)
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 'Z', 'a', 'b', 'c', 'd']

It will also not work at all on Python3:

Python 3.4.3 (default, Feb 25 2015, 21:28:45) 
[GCC 4.2.1 Compatible Apple LLVM 6.0 (clang-600.0.56)] on darwin
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> c = ['c', 'b', 'd', 'a', 'Z', 0, 4, 2, 1, 3]
>>> sorted(c)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: unorderable types: int() < str()

The solution is create a tuple with a index integer as the first element (based on the items type) and the items itself as the next element. Python 2 and 3 will sort tuples with the second element heterogeneous types.

Given:

>>> c = ['c', 'b', 'd', 'a', 'Z', 'abc', 0, 4, 2, 1, 3,33, 33.333]

Note mixture of characters, integers, strings, floats

def f(e):
    d={int:1, float:1, str:0}
    return d.get(type(e), 0), e

>>> sorted(c, key=f)   
['Z', 'a', 'abc', 'b', 'c', 'd', 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 33, 33.333]

Or, if you want a lambda:

>>> sorted(c,key = lambda e: ({int:1, float:1, str:0}.get(type(e), 0), e)))  
['Z', 'a', 'abc', 'b', 'c', 'd', 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 33, 33.333]

Based on the comment from "the wolf", you can also do:

>>> sorted(c,key = lambda e: (isinstance(e, (float, int)), e))
['Z', 'a', 'abc', 'b', 'c', 'd', 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 33, 33.333]

Which I must agree is better...

  • 2
    The is not consistent with Python's polymorphism: you should allow any object that behaves like an int to be treated like one, instead of mandating that it be one by using type -- use isinstance instead to allow derived classes to be treated consistently. – the wolf Mar 31 '15 at 18:50
1
[sorted([letter for letter in c if isinstance(letter, str)]) + \
 sorted([number for number in c if isinstance(number, int)]]

Should do it.

  • Yeah, it's early and I haven't had coffee, so I assumed the numbers were in quotes as well :| but it's fixed now. – a p Mar 31 '15 at 16:44
1

Let's say we have a hybrid list like this:

c = ['s', 'a',2 , 'j', 9, 'e', 11, 't', 'k', 12, 'q']

first we need to slice up the list into two separate parts (strings and integers), sort them individually and then append them in the end. Here's one way to do it:

>>> c = sorted([i for i in c if not str(i).isdigit()]) + sorted([i for i in c if str(i).isdigit()])

Now you get:

>>> c
['a', 'e', 'j', 'k', 'q', 's', 't', 2, 9, 11, 12]
1

If you have a list of mixed ascii and numeric types, you need to determine what is a numeric object type. You can use the Numbers abstract base class to determine what is an instance of a number (int, float, long, complex) class, including all derived classes (bool, Decimal, Franctions, etc):

>>> from numbers import Number
>>> [isinstance(n, Number) for n in (0,1.1,0j,True,'a')]
[True, True, True, True, False]

Once you know what is an instance of a number, you can use a Python bool to create a primary sort key with the list item itself as a secondary key (ie, tuples comprising of [(True, 1.1), (False, 'abc'), etc]) False will sort lower than True just as 0<1 in a typical ascending order sort, so that is just what we wanted.

Applying that to your list (expanded) as an example:

>>> c = ['c', 'b', 'd', 'a', 4, 2, 1, 35, 1.1, 6L, 'aac', True]
>>> sorted(c, key=lambda e: (isinstance(e, Number), e))
['a', 'aac', 'b', 'c', 'd', 1, True, 1.1, 2, 4, 6L, 35]

Note that different numeric types are being correctly sorted (1<=True<1.1<6L<35)

0

You can also use the cmp parm:

c = ['c', 'b', 'd', 'a', 4, 2, 1, 3]

def compare_function(a, b):
    if isinstance(a, str) and isinstance(b, int):
        return -1
    if isinstance(a, int) and isinstance(b, str):
        return 1
    return cmp(a, b)

c.sort(cmp=compare_function)
  • 1
    em... cmp is kind of deprecated. but you can always transform a cmp function to key by functools.cmp_to_key. – Jason Hu Mar 31 '15 at 17:01

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