313

If I want to check for the existence of a single file, I can test for it using test -e filename or [ -e filename ].

Supposing I have a glob and I want to know whether any files exist whose names match the glob. The glob can match 0 files (in which case I need to do nothing), or it can match 1 or more files (in which case I need to do something). How can I test whether a glob has any matches? (I don't care how many matches there are, and it would be best if I could do this with one if statement and no loops (simply because I find that most readable).

(test -e glob* fails if the glob matches more than one file.)

4
  • 3
    I suspect my answer below is 'clearly correct' in a way that all the others kind of hack-around. It's a one-line shell-builtin that's been around forever and appears to be 'the intended tool for this particular job'. I'm concerned that users will mistakenly reference the accepted answer here. Anybody please feel free to correct me and I'll withdraw my comment here, I'm more than happy to be wrong and learn from it. If the difference didn't appear so drastic, I wouldn't raise this issue. Dec 11, 2015 at 20:18
  • 1
    My favorite solutions to this question are the find command which works in any shell (even non-Bourne shells) but requires GNU find, and the compgen command which is clearly a Bashism. Too bad I can't accept both answers.
    – Ken Bloom
    Jan 4, 2016 at 15:29
  • 1
    Note: This question has been edited since it was asked. The original title was "Test whether a glob has any matches in bash". The specific shell, 'bash', was dropped from the question after I published my answer. The editing of the question's title makes my answer appear to be in error. I hope someone can amend or at least address this change. Sep 9, 2018 at 16:16
  • Adding here a note that "glob" is a synonym for "wildcard", in case people are searching on the second term.
    – tripleee
    May 10, 2021 at 16:42

22 Answers 22

270

Bash-specific solution:

compgen -G "<glob-pattern>"

Escape the pattern or it'll get pre-expanded into matches.

Exit status is:

  • 1 for no-match,
  • 0 for 'one or more matches'

stdout is a list of files matching the glob. I think this is the best option in terms of conciseness and minimizing potential side effects.

Example:

if compgen -G "/tmp/someFiles*" > /dev/null; then
    echo "Some files exist."
fi
12
  • 17
    Note that compgen is a bash-specific built-in command and is not part of the POSIX standard Unix shell specified built-in commands. pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799 pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799/utilities/… Therefore, avoid using it in scripts where portability to other shells is a concern. Aug 4, 2016 at 8:30
  • 6
    It seems to me that a similar effect without bash builtins would be to use any other command which acts on a glob and fails if no files matched, such as ls: if ls /tmp/*Files 2>&1 >/dev/null; then echo exists; fi - maybe useful for code golf? Fails if there's a file named the same as the glob, which the glob shouldn't have matched, but if that's the case you probably have bigger problems. May 15, 2017 at 17:24
  • 8
    @DewiMorgan This is simpler: if ls /tmp/*Files &> /dev/null; then echo exists; fi Mar 29, 2018 at 19:47
  • 3
    yeah, quote it or the filename wildcard will be pre-expanded. compgen "dir/*.ext" Jan 3, 2019 at 18:42
  • 2
    @DewiMorgan: your suggestion of: if ls /tmp/*Files 2>&1 >/dev/null; then echo exists; fi is bascially a good one, but the redirection won't work as written, you want: if ls /tmp/*Files >/dev/null 2>&1 ; then echo exists; fi Dec 13, 2021 at 15:52
202

The nullglob shell option is indeed a bashism.

To avoid the need for a tedious save and restore of the nullglob state, I'd only set it inside the subshell that expands the glob:

if test -n "$(shopt -s nullglob; echo glob*)"
then
    echo found
else
    echo not found
fi

For better portability and more flexible globbing, use find:

if test -n "$(find . -maxdepth 1 -name 'glob*' -print -quit)"
then
    echo found
else
    echo not found
fi

Explicit -print -quit actions are used for find instead of the default implicit -print action so that find will quit as soon as it finds the first file matching the search criteria. Where lots of files match, this should run much faster than echo glob* or ls glob* and it also avoids the possibility of overstuffing the expanded command line (some shells have a 4K length limit).

If find feels like overkill and the number of files likely to match is small, use stat:

if stat -t glob* >/dev/null 2>&1
then
    echo found
else
    echo not found
fi
7
  • 11
    find seems to be exactly correct. It has no corner cases, since the shell isn't doing expansion (and passing an unexpanded glob to some other command), it's portable between shells (though apparently not all of the options you use are specified by POSIX), and it's faster than ls -d glob* (the previous accepted answer) becasue it stops when it reaches the first match.
    – Ken Bloom
    Nov 24, 2010 at 14:54
  • 1
    Note that this answer may require a shopt -u failglob as these options seem to conflict somehow.
    – Calimo
    Jul 30, 2014 at 13:42
  • The find solution will match a filename with no glob characters as well. In this case, that's what I wanted. Just something to be aware of though. Aug 19, 2014 at 14:33
  • 1
    unix.stackexchange.com/questions/275637/… discusses how to replace the -maxdepth option for a POSIX find.
    – Ken Bloom
    Feb 21, 2018 at 15:58
  • find is usually the resilient and portable answer when scripting, but for me, detecting a glob match is usually to prepare for using the glob, so I want all the existing shopt glob options and stick to the shell itself so I get the same results. Oct 14, 2018 at 9:11
33

I like

exists() {
    [ -e "$1" ]
}

if exists glob*; then
    echo found
else
    echo not found
fi

This is both readable and efficient (unless there are a huge number of files).
The main drawback is that it's much more subtle than it looks, and I sometimes feel compelled to add a long comment.
If there's a match, "glob*" is expanded by the shell and all the matches are passed to exists(), which checks the first one and ignores the rest.
If there's no match, "glob*" is passed to exists() and found not to exist there either.

Edit: there may be a false positive, see comment

3
  • 15
    It may return a false positive if the glob is something like *.[cC] (there may be not c or C file, but a file called *.[cC]) or false negative if the first file expanded from that is for instance a symlink to an unexistent file or to a file in a directory you don't have access to (you way want to add a || [ -L "$1" ]). Jun 13, 2013 at 20:39
  • Interesting. Shellcheck reports that globbing only works with -e, when there are 0 or 1 matches. It doesn't work for multiple matches, because that would become [ -e file1 file2 ] and this would fail. Also see github.com/koalaman/shellcheck/wiki/SC2144 for the rationale and suggested solutions. Feb 7, 2020 at 5:58
  • Consider [ -e "$1" ] || [ -L "$1" ] -- as currently written this will be false if the glob does have matches, but the first of those matches is a broken symlink. Aug 6, 2022 at 13:50
27
#!/usr/bin/env bash

# If it is set, then an unmatched glob is swept away entirely -- 
# replaced with a set of zero words -- 
# instead of remaining in place as a single word.
shopt -s nullglob

M=(*px)

if [ "${#M[*]}" -ge 1 ]; then
    echo "${#M[*]} matches."
else
    echo "No such files."
fi
5
  • 2
    To avoid a possible false “no matches” set nullglob instead of checking to see if a single result equals the pattern itself. Some patterns can match names that are exactly equal to the pattern itself (e.g. a*b; but not e.g. a?b or [a]). May 30, 2010 at 4:00
  • I suppose this fails on the highly unlikely chance that there's actually a file named like the glob. (e.g. somebody ran touch '*py'), but this does point me in another good direction.
    – Ken Bloom
    May 30, 2010 at 4:01
  • I like this one as the most general version.
    – Ken Bloom
    May 30, 2010 at 16:11
  • And also shortest. If you are only expecting one match, you can use "$M" as a shorthand for "${M[0]}". Otherwise, well you already have the glob expansion in an array variable, so you're gtg for passing it to other things as a list, instead of making them re-expand the glob. Feb 27, 2015 at 8:31
  • 1
    Nice. You can test M more quickly (less bytes and without spawning a [ process) with if [[ $M ]]; then ...
    – Tobia
    Oct 6, 2015 at 10:05
13

If you have globfail set you can use this crazy (which you really should not)

shopt -s failglob # exit if * does not match 
( : * ) && echo 0 || echo 1

or

q=( * ) && echo 0 || echo 1
2
  • 3
    A fantastic use of a noop failing. Never should be used... but really beautiful. :) Dec 10, 2015 at 6:40
  • You can put the shopt inside the parens. That way it only affects the test: (shopt -s failglob; : *) 2>/dev/null && echo exists
    – flabdablet
    Apr 3, 2020 at 15:03
8

test -e has the unfortunate caveat that it considers broken symbolic links to not exist. So you may want to check for those, too.

function globexists {
  test -e "$1" -o -L "$1"
}

if globexists glob*; then
    echo found
else
    echo not found
fi
2
  • 5
    That still doesn't fix the false-positive on filenames that have glob special-characters in them, like Stephane Chazelas points out for Dan Bloch's answer. (unless you monkey with nullglob). Feb 27, 2015 at 5:47
  • 4
    You shoud avoid -o and -a in test/[. For instance, here, it fails if $1 is = with most implementations. Use [ -e "$1" ] || [ -L "$1" ] instead. Aug 22, 2015 at 18:22
6

I have yet another solution:

if [ "$(echo glob*)" != 'glob*' ]

This works nicely for me. There may be some corner cases I missed.

4
  • 2
    Works except if the file is actually named 'glob*'. Sep 23, 2016 at 2:23
  • does work for passing in glob as variable - gives "too many arguments" error when there is more than one match. "$(echo $GLOB)" is not returning a single string or at least it's not interpreted as single single thus the too many arguments error
    – DKebler
    Feb 1, 2018 at 18:14
  • @DKebler : it should be interpreted as single string, because it is wrapped in double-quotes. May 24, 2019 at 7:54
  • This will fail if the nullglob shell option is set, and it's always unnecessarily slow (as $(...) involves forking off a new copy of the shell). Dec 8, 2020 at 22:48
4

Based on flabdablet's answer, for me it looks like easiest (not necessarily fastest) is just to use find itself, while leaving glob expansion on shell, like:

find /some/{p,long-p}ath/with/*globs* -quit &> /dev/null && echo "MATCH"

Or in if like:

if find $yourGlob -quit &> /dev/null; then
    echo "MATCH"
else
    echo "NOT-FOUND"
fi
5
  • This works exactly like the version I already presented using stat; not sure how find is "easier" than stat.
    – flabdablet
    Aug 1, 2014 at 0:41
  • 3
    Be aware that &> redirection is a bashism, and will quietly do the wrong thing in other shells.
    – flabdablet
    Aug 1, 2014 at 0:42
  • This seems to be better than flabdablet's find answer because it accepts paths in the glob and it is more terse (doesn't require -maxdepth etc). It also seems better than his stat answer because it doesn't continue to do the extra stating on each additional glob match. I'd appreciate if anyone could contribute corner cases where this doesn't work. May 24, 2016 at 18:29
  • 1
    After futher consideration, I would add -maxdepth 0 because it allows more flexibility in adding conditions. e.g. assume I want to restrict the result to matching files only. I might try find $glob -type f -quit , but that would return true if the glob did NOT match a file, but did match a directory that contained a file (even recursively). In contrast find $glob -maxdepth 0 -type f -quit would only return true if the glob itself matched at least one file. Note that maxdepth does not prevent the glob from having a directory component. ( FYI 2> is sufficient. no need for &>) May 24, 2016 at 19:24
  • 2
    The point of using find in the first place is to avoid having the shell generate and sort a potentially huge list of glob matches; find -name ... -quit will match at most one filename. If a script relies on passing a shell-generated list of glob matches to find, invoking find achieves nothing but unnecessary process-startup overhead. Simply testing the resulting list directly for non-emptiness will be quicker and clearer.
    – flabdablet
    Feb 22, 2018 at 3:54
4

To simplify miku's answer somewhat, based on his idea:

M=(*py)
if [ -e ${M[0]} ]; then
  echo Found
else
  echo Not Found
fi
2
  • 4
    Close, but what if you are matching [a], have a file named [a], but no file named a? I still like nullglob for this. Some might view this as pedantic, but we might as well be as fully correct as is reasonable. May 30, 2010 at 6:15
  • @sondra.kinsey That's wrong; the glob [a] should only match a, not the literal file name [a].
    – tripleee
    Jun 10, 2019 at 17:39
3

In Bash, you can glob to an array; if the glob didn't match, your array will contain a single entry that doesn't correspond to an existing file:

#!/bin/bash

shellglob='*.sh'

scripts=($shellglob)

if [ -e "${scripts[0]}" ]
then stat "${scripts[@]}"
fi

Note: if you have nullglob set, scripts will be an empty array, and you should test with [ "${scripts[*]}" ] or with [ "${#scripts[*]}" != 0 ] instead. If you're writing a library that must work with or without nullglob, you'll want

if [ "${scripts[*]}" ] && [ -e "${scripts[0]}" ]

An advantage of this approach is that you then have the list of files you want to work with, rather than having to repeat the glob operation.

2
  • Why, with nullglob set, and the array possibly empty, can you not still test with if [ -e "${scripts[0]}" ]...? Are you also allowing for the possibility of shell option nounset set?
    – johnraff
    Dec 21, 2018 at 6:18
  • @johnraff, yes, I normally assume nounset is active. Also, it might be (slightly) cheaper to test the string is non-empty than to check for a file's presence. Unlikely though, given that we've just performed a glob, meaning the directory contents should be fresh in the OS's cache. Jan 9, 2019 at 9:46
3

If you want to test if the files exist before iterating over them, you can use this pattern:

  for F in glob*; do
    if [[ ! -f $F ]]; then break; fi
    
    ...

  done

if the glob does not does not match anything, $F will be the non-expanded glob ('glob*' in this case) and if a file with the same name does not exist, it will skip the rest of the loop.

2
#!/bin/bash
set nullglob
touch /tmp/foo1 /tmp/foo2 /tmp/foo3
FOUND=0
for FILE in /tmp/foo*
do
    FOUND=$((${FOUND} + 1))
done
if [ ${FOUND} -gt 0 ]; then
    echo "I found ${FOUND} matches"
else
    echo "No matches found"
fi
4
  • 2
    This version fails when precisely one file matches, but you can avoid the FOUND=-1 kludge by using the nullglob shell option.
    – Ken Bloom
    May 30, 2010 at 3:39
  • @Ken: Hmm, I would not call nullglob a kludge. Comparing a single result to the original pattern is a kludge (and prone to false results), using nullglob is not. May 30, 2010 at 4:02
  • @Chris: I think you misread. I didn't call nullglob a kludge.
    – Ken Bloom
    May 30, 2010 at 4:08
  • 1
    @Ken: Indeed, I did misread. Please accept my apologies for my invalid criticism. May 30, 2010 at 6:21
2
set -- glob*
if [ -f "$1" ]; then
  echo "It matched"
fi

Explanation

When there isn't a match for glob*, then $1 will contain 'glob*'. The test -f "$1" won't be true because the glob* file doesn't exist.

Why this is better than alternatives

This works with sh and derivates: KornShell and Bash. It doesn't create any sub-shell. $(..) and `...` commands create a sub-shell; they fork a process, and therefore are slower than this solution.

2
  • 1
    The duplicate stackoverflow.com/questions/6363441/… has a number of other non-Bash solutions, many of them horrible.
    – tripleee
    Jul 31, 2020 at 7:45
  • You might want [ -e "$1" ] || [ -L "$1" ]; your current code treats a glob where the first match is a broken symlink, or a directory, or anything else except a file, as if it had no matches at all. Aug 6, 2022 at 13:42
2

Like this in Bash (test files containing pattern):

shopt -s nullglob
compgen -W *pattern* &>/dev/null
case $? in
    0) echo "only one file match" ;;
    1) echo "more than one file match" ;;
    2) echo "no file match" ;;
esac

It's far better than compgen -G: because we can discriminates more cases and more precisely.

It can work with only one wildcard *.

1

This abomination seems to work:

#!/usr/bin/env bash
shopt -s nullglob
if [ "`echo *py`" != "" ]; then
    echo "Glob matched"
else
    echo "Glob did not match"
fi

It probably requires bash, not sh.

This works because the nullglob option causes the glob to evaluate to an empty string if there are no matches. Thus any non-empty output from the echo command indicates that the glob matched something.

8
  • You should use if [ "`echo *py`" != "*py"]
    – yegle
    Feb 22, 2014 at 6:09
  • 2
    That would not work correctly if there was a file called *py. Feb 22, 2014 at 10:28
  • If there's no file end with py, `echo *py` will be evaluate to *py.
    – yegle
    Feb 22, 2014 at 16:00
  • 2
    Yes, but it will also do so if there is a single file called *py, which is the wrong result. Feb 22, 2014 at 19:55
  • 1
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but if there's no file that matches *py, your script will echo "Glob matched"?
    – yegle
    Feb 23, 2014 at 4:32
0

A solution for extended globs (extglob) in Bash:

bash -c $'shopt -s extglob \n /bin/ls -1U <ext-glob-pattern>'

Exit status is 0 if there is at least one match, and non-zero (2) when there is no match. Standard output contains a newline-separated list of matching files (and file names containing spaces they are quoted).

Or, slightly different:

bash -c $'shopt -s extglob \n compgen -G <ext-glob-pattern>'

Differences to the ls-based solution: probably faster (not measured), file names with spaces not quoted in output, exit code 1 when there is no match (not 2 :shrug:).

Example usage:

No match:

$ bash -c $'shopt -s extglob \n /bin/ls -1U @(*.foo|*.bar)'; echo "exit status: $?"
/bin/ls: cannot access '@(*.foo|*.bar)': No such file or directory
exit status: 2

At least one match:

$ bash -c $'shopt -s extglob \n /bin/ls -1U @(*.ts|*.mp4)'; echo "exit status: $?"
'video1 with spaces.mp4'
video2.mp4
video3.mp4
exit status: 0

Concepts used:

  • ls' exit code behavior (adds -U for efficiency, and -1 for output control).
  • Does not enable extglob in current shell (often not desired).
  • Makes use of the $ prefix so that the \n is interpreted, so that the extended glob pattern is on a different line than the shopt -s extglob -- otherwise the extended glob pattern would be a syntax error!

Note 1: I worked towards this solution because the compgen -G "<glob-pattern>" approach suggested in other answers does not seem to work smoothly with brace expansion; and yet I needed some more advanced globbing features.

Note 2: lovely resource for the extended glob syntax: extglob

1
0

Both nullglob and compgen are useful only on some bash shells.

A (non-recursive) solution that works on most shells is:

set -- ./glob*                  # or /path/dir/glob*
[ -f "$1" ] || shift            # remove the glob if present.
if    [ "$#" -lt 1 ]
then  echo "at least one file found"
fi
0

Assuming you may want to do something with the files if they exist:

mapfile -t exists < <(find "$dirName" -type f -iname '*.zip'); [[ ${#exists} -ne 0 ]] && { echo "Zip files found" ; } || { echo "Zip files not found" ; }

You can then loop through the exists array if you need to do something with the files.

-1
(ls glob* &>/dev/null && echo Files found) || echo No file found
2
  • 5
    Would also return false if there are directories matching glob* and for instance you don't have the write to list those directories. Jun 13, 2013 at 20:42
  • Also, note that foo && bar || baz is not fully identical to if foo; then bar; else baz; fi; demonstrating it in a teaching resource is poor form. (It's possible for both bar and baz to execute, should bar have a nonzero exit status). Aug 6, 2022 at 13:49
-2
if ls -d $glob > /dev/null 2>&1; then
  echo Found.
else
  echo Not found.
fi

Note that this can be very time cosuming if there are a lot of matches or file access is slow.

2
  • 2
    This will give the wrong answer if a pattern like [a] is used when the file [a] is present and the file a is absent. It will say “found” even though the only file it should match, a, is not actually present. May 30, 2010 at 8:25
  • 1
    This version should work in an ordinary POSIX /bin/sh (without bashisms), and in the case that I'm need it for, the glob doesn't have brackets anyway, and I don't need to worry about cases that are terribly pathological. But I guess that there is no one good way to do test whether any files match a glob.
    – Ken Bloom
    May 30, 2010 at 16:11
-3

ls | grep -q "glob.*"

Not the most efficient solution (if there's a ton of files in the directory it might be slowish), but it's simple, easy to read and also has the advantage that regexes are more powerful than plain Bash glob patterns.

1
  • Note that "plain" bash glob patterns aren't the only type bash supports -- it also has extglobs, which are comparable in expressiveness to regexes. The bigger problem is that ls is unreliable for programmatic use. Aug 6, 2022 at 13:47
-4
[ `ls glob* 2>/dev/null | head -n 1` ] && echo true
4
  • 1
    For a better answer try to add some explanation to your code. Jun 12, 2019 at 4:16
  • 1
    In this case, though, it's not even good code. If you have a file named glob -a foo = bar, you'll get a false result even though it should be true; and it's extremely inefficient. Dec 8, 2020 at 22:47
  • This does not test for files, it tests for directories that match glob*
    – teknopaul
    Apr 22, 2021 at 18:11
  • 1
    As always, don't use ls in scripts.
    – tripleee
    May 10, 2021 at 16:41

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