1

Most simplified version of the issue can be expressed via the code :

struct Outer {
    class Person {
        var name:String?
    }
    let member = Person()
}

Throws compile error : Outer.Person cannot be constructed because it has no accessible initializers.
Any hints on why it doesn't compile ?

Possible workarounds (either one will eliminate the compile error) :

  1. Setting initial value as nil for the optional property var name:String? = nil . But doesn't this partially contradicts the purpose of declaring it optional (not needing to explicitly assign a value upon declaration)?
  2. Explicitly mentioning the reference type when creating the class instance let member:Person = Person() . Why isn't type inference doing the same thing behind the scenes ?
  3. Replacing outer struct with a class.


As an observation, the second workaround doesn't help in case the class is local, belonging to a func :

func checkPerson() {
    class Person {
        var name:String?
    }
    let member:Person = Person()
    // Still throws compile error
}


For this case workaround nr 1. ( setting initial value as nil ) is the only one that removes the compile error.

I am using Xcode 6.2, OS X Yosemite 10.10.2

  • 1
    It sounds like a bug. And it seems already solved in the latest Xcode Beta. – Matteo Piombo Mar 31 '15 at 18:32
  • Thanks, installed XCode Beta 6.3 and indeed it works ok – Sorin J Mar 31 '15 at 19:48
3

In XCode 6.2(Swift 1.1), your Person class does not have any init() method included.

Change your code the the following:

struct Outer {
    class Person {
        var name:String?
        init(){}
    }
    let member = Person()
}

Seems Apple has fixed this issue in XCode 6.3 beta(Swift 1.2), it wont show compile error, even you do the following:

struct Outer {
    class Person {
        var name:String?
    }
    let member = Person()
}
|improve this answer|||||
  • It is the role of the default initiliazer to kick in, it doesn't have to be explicitly written, when no other initilizers are explicitly written and all the properties have initial values (or are optional). Question was why doesn't it work when a class is within a struct. It works ok if the class is top level or part of another class. – Sorin J Mar 31 '15 at 17:56
  • @SorinJ, seems Apple fixed this issue in Swift 1.2, please see my edited answer. – ztan Mar 31 '15 at 19:45
  • Yes, I've seen @Matteo Piombo answer and installed XCode Beta, all good there. Thanks for the feedback. – Sorin J Mar 31 '15 at 19:50

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