18

Given a month in numeric form (e.g., 2 for February), how do you find the first month of its respective quarter (e.g., 1 for January)?

I read through the datetime module documentation and the Pandas documentation of their datetime functions, which ought to be relevant, but I could not find a function that solves this problem.

Essentially, what I am trying to understand is how I could produce a function like the one below that, given month x, outputs the number corresponding to the first month of x's quarter.

>> first_month_quarter(5)
4
1

5 Answers 5

26

It's a simple mapping function that needs to convert:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
           |
           V
1 1 1 4 4 4 7 7 7 10 10 10

This can be done in a number of ways with integral calculations, two of which are:

def firstMonthInQuarter(month):
    return (month - 1) // 3 * 3 + 1

and:

def firstMonthInQuarter(month):
    return month - (month - 1) % 3

The first involves integer division of the month converted to a zero-based month to get the zero-based quarter, multiplication to turn that back into a zero-based month (but the month at the start of the quarter), then adding one again to make the range 1..12.

month  -1  //3  *3  +1
-----  --  ---  --  --
    1   0    0   0   1
    2   1    0   0   1
    3   2    0   0   1
    4   3    1   3   4
    5   4    1   3   4
    6   5    1   3   4
    7   6    2   6   7
    8   7    2   6   7
    9   8    2   6   7
   10   9    3   9  10
   11  10    3   9  10
   12  11    3   9  10

The second just subtracts the position within a quarter (0, 1, 2) from the month itself to get the starting month.

month(a)  -1  %3(b)  a-b
--------  --  -----  ---
       1   0      0    1
       2   1      1    1
       3   2      2    1
       4   3      0    4
       5   4      1    4
       6   5      2    4
       7   6      0    7
       8   7      1    7
       9   8      2    7
      10   9      0   10
      11  10      1   10
      12  11      2   10
2
  • would u be able to comment on the speed of all the three methods? Commented Jun 22, 2018 at 8:37
  • 4
    @RhythemAggarwal, for a start, there are only two methods I presented :-) In any case, the time difference between the two will be small enough as to not matter at all. Optimisations, unless you're needing to do things millions of times a second, are best reserved for macro things like data structure or algorithm selection.
    – paxdiablo
    Commented Jun 22, 2018 at 10:05
24

It's not so pretty, but if speed is important a simple list lookup slaughters math:

def quarter(month, quarters=[None, 1, 1, 1, 4, 4, 4,
                             7, 7, 7, 10, 10, 10]):
    """Return the first month of the quarter for a given month."""
    return quarters[month]

A timeit comparison suggests this is about twice as fast as TigerhawkT3's mathematical approach.


Test script:

import math

def quarter(month, quarters=[None, 1, 1, 1, 4, 4, 4,
                             7, 7, 7, 10, 10, 10]):
    """Return the first month of the quarter for a given month."""
    return quarters[month]

def firstMonthInQuarter1(month):
    return (month - 1) // 3 * 3 + 1

def firstMonthInQuarter2(month):
    return month - (month - 1) % 3

def first_month_quarter(month):
    return int(math.ceil(month / 3.)) * 3 - 2

if __name__ == '__main__':
    from timeit import timeit
    methods = ['quarter', 'firstMonthInQuarter1', 'firstMonthInQuarter2',
               'first_month_quarter']
    setup = 'from __main__ import {}'.format(','.join(methods))
    results = {method: timeit('[{}(x) for x in range(1, 13)]'.format(method),
                              setup=setup)
               for method in methods}
    for method in methods:
        print '{}:\t{}'.format(method, results[method])

Results:

quarter:    3.01457574242
firstMonthInQuarter1:   4.51578357209
firstMonthInQuarter2:   4.01768559763
first_month_quarter:    8.08281871176
3
  • 9
    It's always risky to make speed claims when answers may come along later. For ten million iterations, your method takes 7.2 seconds but the two in my answer are 7.0 and 7.3. In fact, even the math one clocks in at 7.6 so it's not so bad. Not saying your solution is no good (in fact there's little difference between the lot), just saying you may want to dial back a bit on the claims :-) In any case, thanks for educating me on timeit, I'd not seen that before
    – paxdiablo
    Commented Apr 2, 2015 at 13:40
  • @paxdiablo true! However, I've just re-run the tests, including your approaches, and seen similar results - using a list is more than twice as fast as the math.ceil and 25-50% faster than integer arithmetic (timeit defaults to 1,000,000 iterations). I've updated the answer with my testing and results.
    – jonrsharpe
    Commented Apr 2, 2015 at 14:15
  • Upvoted. There's a reason that Date and Time dimension tables exist in data warehouses. Commented Jan 27 at 13:28
14
def first_month(month):
    return (month-1)//3*3+1

for i in range(1,13):
    print i, first_month(i)
1
  • This would have been my answer had I not been asleep at the time it was asked :-) Convert to zero-based month number and just use integer math.
    – paxdiablo
    Commented Apr 1, 2015 at 1:32
10

Here is an answer suggested by TigerhawkT3. Perhaps the leanest suggestion so far and, apparently, also the fastest.

import math

def first_month_quarter(month):
    return int(math.ceil(month / 3.)) * 3 - 2

For example:

>> first_month_quarter(5)
4
4
  • 2
    The standard math module also has a ceil function that is functionally equivalent for this. Commented Mar 31, 2015 at 18:42
  • Good point! I've never really known how to choose between the ceil functions of numpy and math. Not sure how/when they differ in their efficiency and output.
    – Gyan Veda
    Commented Mar 31, 2015 at 18:44
  • 1
    You could also use ((month - 1) // 3 % 4) * 3 + 1, which agrees for months between 1 and 12 (inclusive), and always returns one of the months 1, 4, 7, or 10 for months less than 1 or greater than 12.
    – unutbu
    Commented Mar 31, 2015 at 18:49
  • 2
    I would also recommend simplifying the return formula to return 3*qrtr - 2 instead of return qrtr + (qrtr-1) * 2. It's more than twice as fast (tested), probably due to only having to get the value of qrtr once. Plus, then you don't have to save qrtr, turning the entire function into return int(math.ceil(month/3.)) * 3 - 2. If you switch to Python 3, you don't even have to call int, because Python 3's ceil already returns an int. Could be good if you have a lot of records to work with. Commented Mar 31, 2015 at 19:11
6

Packing a lookup table into a 64-bit literal:

# Python 2
def firstMonthOfQuarter(month):
    return (0x000aaa7774441110L >> (month << 2)) & 15

# Python 3
def firstMonthOfQuarter(month):
    return (0x000aaa7774441110 >> (month << 2)) & 15

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.