7

I use System.Linq.Dynamic to order an items list.

items = items.AsQueryable().OrderBy("Name ASC");

To my surprise, lowercase names gets ordered after the capital cased names, so the items are returned something like this.

Ape
Cat
Dog
alligator
ant
beetle

I expected this order:

alligator
ant
Ape
beetle
Cat
Dog

Is there a way to get the correct order? Checked all method signatures for OrderBy and googled around, but nada.

1
  • More in depth answer regarding IComparer/IComparable here. Mar 31, 2015 at 22:34

3 Answers 3

10

You do not need to create a custom comparer because there's already a StringComparer class which derives from IComparer.

words.OrderBy (x => x, StringComparer.OrdinalIgnoreCase)

This way, you do not need to create different IComparer implementations if you wanted to use other string comparison methods, like StringComparer.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase.

However, this might be desirable depending on your situation. For example, I do have multiple extension methods defined in LINQPad, like OrderBySelfInvariantCultureIgnoreCase, because it is convenient to use this with code completion rather than typing out the equivalent code by hand:

public static IEnumerable<string> OrderBySelfInvariantCultureIgnoreCase(this IEnumerable<string> source)
{   
    return source.OrderBy (x => x, StringComparer.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase);
}
1
  • Using the already-implemented StringComparer classes seems better than the accepted answer, which defines a custom comparer that does the same thing.
    – Sam Magura
    Apr 16, 2019 at 17:08
1

I have faced the same issue and found no easy solution over the internet. Then I was trying in many ways and finally got a very simple way. It completely worked for me. My solution is

string sort = "Name ASC";
string[] data = sort.Split(" ");

items.OrderBy($"{data[0].ToUpper() data[1]}");

Now the output is alligator, ant, Ape, beetle, Cat, Dog

0

You must create a custom comparer, such as:

public void Main() 
{   
    String[] words = { "aPPLE", "AbAcUs", "bRaNcH", "BlUeBeRrY", "ClOvEr", "cHeRry" }; 

    var sortedWords = words.OrderBy(a => a, new CaseInsensitiveComparer()); 

    ObjectDumper.Write(sortedWords); 
} 

public class CaseInsensitiveComparer : IComparer<string> 
{ 
    public int Compare(string x, string y) 
    { 
        return string.Compare(x, y, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase); 
    } 
}

Found @ https://code.msdn.microsoft.com/SQL-Ordering-Operators-050af19e

4
  • When I use your more generic example I get it to work. The thing is that I use AsQueryable on a MongoCollection<T> and then System.Linq.Dynamic.OrderBy to try to sort it. When I pass your CaseInsensitiveComparer as a second parameter it doesn't work. But that maybe qualifies as another more specific question... Mar 31, 2015 at 22:47
  • I used generic sorter but when I passed new CaseInsensitiveComparer() to source.OrderBy<T, object>(sortExpression), it gives me error.
    – Shikha
    Jan 11, 2019 at 11:56
  • @Shikha It would help if you provide specific code that you used, which did not work. No offense, but I don't exactly trust what people SAY they did. My gut feel based on your words is that you are not using the overloaded version of OrderBy() Jan 11, 2019 at 16:37
  • @BryanOfEarth here is the code: public IQueryable<T> Sort(IQueryable<T> source, string sortBy, string sortDirection) {var param = Expression.Parameter(typeof(T), CollectionName);var sortExpression = Expression.Lambda<Func<T, object>>(Expression.Convert(Expression.Property(param, sortBy), typeof(object)), param); switch (sortDirection.ToLower()){case "asc": return source.OrderBy<T, object>(sortExpression, ); default:return source.OrderByDescending<T, object>(sortExpression); }}
    – Shikha
    Jan 14, 2019 at 6:37

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