2

For example, it would be great if I could do the following:

private void SetSessionGlobalization(Oracle.DataAccess.Client.OracleConnection aConnection)
{
    System.Globalization.CultureInfo lCultureInfo = System.Threading.Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture;
    aConnection.SetSessionInfo(lCultureInfo);
}

But that does not work because SetSessionInfo takes a OracleGlobalization class as a parameter, not a CultureInfo!

And this does not work either:

private void SetSessionGlobalization(Oracle.DataAccess.Client.OracleConnection aConnection)
{
    Oracle.DataAccess.Client.OracleGlobalization lClientGlobalization = Oracle.DataAccess.Client.OracleGlobalization.GetClientInfo());
    aConnection.SetSessionInfo(lClientGlobalization);
}

Because GetClientInfo gets Oracle's version of the client globalization settings, not Windows.

What am I missing here? How do I set my database connection session to be the same as that used by my thread (which will be the same as Windows by default)?

2
  • FYI: The fully managed client (Oracle.ManagedDataAccess) does this by default.
    – cremor
    Apr 7 '15 at 7:30
  • cremor, we are moving our code base to the fully managed ODP driver anyway so this solves my problem nicely, thank you!
    – VinceJS
    Apr 7 '15 at 20:45
1

I think you have to assign each property manually. It would be like this.

private void SetSessionGlobalization(Oracle.DataAccess.Client.OracleConnection aConnection)
{

     OracleGlobalization info = aConnection.GetSessionInfo();
     System.Globalization.CultureInfo lCultureInfo = System.Threading.Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture;
     var ri = new System.Globalization.RegionInfo(lCultureInfo.LCID);

     info.Calendar = lCultureInfo.Calendar.GetType().Name.Replace("Calendar", String.Empty);         
     info.Currency = ri.CurrencySymbol;
     info.DualCurrency = ri.CurrencySymbol;
     info.ISOCurrency = ri.ISOCurrencySymbol;
     info.DateFormat = lCultureInfo.DateTimeFormat.ShortDatePattern + " " + lCultureInfo.DateTimeFormat.ShortTimePattern.Replace("HH", "HH24").Replace("mm", "mi");
     info.DateLanguage = System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex.Replace(lCultureInfo.EnglishName , @" \(.+\)",String.Empty);
     info.NumericCharacters = lCultureInfo.NumberFormat.NumberDecimalSeparator + lCultureInfo.NumberFormat.NumberGroupSeparator;
     info.TimeZone = String.Format("{0}:{1}", TimeZoneInfo.Local.BaseUtcOffset.Hours,  TimeZoneInfo.Local.BaseUtcOffset.Minutes);
     info.Language = ...
     info.Territory = ...
     info.TimeStampFormat = ...
     info.TimeStampTZFormat = ...

     try {
        aConnection.SetSessionInfo(info);
     } catch ( OracleException err ) {
        MessageBox.Show(err.Message);
     }
}

You have to to several kind of translations, e.g. for Date format or Region/Language. I hope you got an idea how to do it.

Note some (important) settings (e.g. ClientCharacterSet) are Read/only, these values are derived from Registry or Environment variables and are set while opening the connection.

So, the preferred way is to use Registry or Environment variables, then you don't have to set OracleGlobalization.

1
  • I did not want to go this route because it is so error prone but it does appear to be the only way to do it.
    – VinceJS
    Apr 2 '15 at 10:27

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