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I have a Swing GUI that should read a rss feed periodically (the feed is provided by an application I wrote). I've implemented this in a SwingWorker and want to ask if this is a sound design.

Here is the code I wrote for the background method:

@Override
protected Void doInBackground() throws Exception {

    comboBoxModel.removeAllElements();

    while(true) {

        Channel feedChannel = webResource.path(role.role())
                                         .accept(MyMediaType.APPLICATION_RSS)
                                         .get(Rss.class).getChannel();

        List<Item> itemList = feedChannel.getEntryList();

        for(Item item : itemList) {

            String itemLink = item.getLink();

            if(!feedItemMap.containsKey(itemLink)) {

                comboBoxModel.addElement(new Pair<>(itemLink, true));
                feedItemMap.put(itemLink, true);
            }
        }

        Thread.sleep(10000);
    }
}

My idea for letting the thread sleep was to reduce the number of GETs. My program doesn't need to be up to date every millisecond so to reduce the server load I thought this would be a good idea.

After reading this question (java - thread.sleep() within SwingWorker) I'm now confused if this was a good idea after all. What I gathered is that you normally don't let a background thread sleep because the system takes care of it.

However in my case this method seems to be beneficial to me.

Can someone elaborate on possible issues with this implementation?

Any input is appreciated. This goes for the specific topic as well as the general design. If I'm doing something wrong I want to know it. :)

Greetings

  • SwingWorker (despite fact that this forum loves SwingWorker) isn't good idea, I'd be suggest to use standard (simple, managable, settable in compare with SwingWorker) Runnable#Thread – mKorbel Apr 1 '15 at 17:14
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Use a ScheduledExecutorService:

ScheduledExecutorService ses = Executors.newSingleScheduledExecutorService();
ses.scheduleAtFixedRate(new Runnable() {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        doInBackground();
    }
}, 10, TimeUnit.SECONDS);

And get rid of Thread.sleep and the while(true) loop:

protected Void doInBackground() throws Exception {
    comboBoxModel.removeAllElements();
    Channel feedChannel = webResource.path(role.role())
                                     .accept(MyMediaType.APPLICATION_RSS)
                                     .get(Rss.class).getChannel();
    List<Item> itemList = feedChannel.getEntryList();
    for(Item item : itemList) {
        String itemLink = item.getLink();
        if(!feedItemMap.containsKey(itemLink)) {
            comboBoxModel.addElement(new Pair<>(itemLink, true));
            feedItemMap.put(itemLink, true);
        }
    }
}
  • wrong answer - doInBackground() is brigde to Worker Thread, then by default never notified EDT, more in Oracle tutorial Concurency in Swing - part about Event Dispatch Thread (hint read method used by ratchet freak) – mKorbel Apr 1 '15 at 17:08
1

The swing executor (on my debug machine) only fires up 10 threads for all SwingWorkers. This means that if 10 tasks are sleeping then no more tasks can be started until one returns. you can however submit the SwingWorker to any executor for processing instead of relying on the default executor.

There is another issue in your code where you access a gui object from another thread you should instead publish the Pair and use the process method to handle it:

    if(!feedItemMap.containsKey(itemLink)) {
        publish(itemLink);
    }


public void process(List<String> strings){
    for(String str: strings){
        comboBoxModel.addElement(new Pair<>(str, true));
        feedItemMap.put(str, true);
    }
}
  • 1. this question isn't answerable, 2. process without publish isn't answer, empty hint for OP, 3. 10 threads for all SwingWorkers ???, not true, but 12th. (concurrently running) can generating endless bug for SwingWorker (not presented in all JDKs) – mKorbel Apr 1 '15 at 17:12
  • @mKorbel calling execute on a swingworker submits it on a default ExecutorService, if it doesn't exist then it create a new ThreadPool executor with maximumPoolsize = 10. You can still submit it to your own executor (with potentially more threads) no problem. – ratchet freak Apr 2 '15 at 8:27

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