2

Here is a tree. The first column is an identifier for the branch, where 0 is the trunk, L is the first branch on the left and R is the first branch on the right. LL is the branch on the extreme left after the second bifurcation, etc.. the variable length contains the length of each branch.

> tree
  branch length
1      0     20
2      L     12
3     LL     19
4      R     19
5     RL     12
6    RLL     10
7    RLR     12
8     RR     17

tree = data.frame(branch = c("0","L", "LL", "R", "RL", "RLL", "RLR", "RR"), length=c(20,12,19,19,12,10,12,17))
tree$branch = as.character(tree$branch)

and here is a drawing of this tree

enter image description here

Here are two positions on this tree

posA = tree[4,]; posA$length = 12
posB = tree[6,]; posB$length = 3

The positions are given by the branch ID and the distance (variable length) to the origin of the branch (more info in edits).

I wrote the following messy distance function to calculate the shortest distance along the branches between any two points on the tree. The shortest distance along the branches can be understood as the minimal distance an ant would need to walk along the branches to reach one position from the other position.

distance = function(tree, pos1, pos2){
    if (identical(pos1$branch, pos2$branch)){Dist=pos1$length-pos2$length;return(Dist)}
    pos1path = strsplit(pos1$branch, "")[[1]]
    if (pos1path[1]!="0") {pos1path = c("0", pos1path)}
    pos2path = strsplit(pos2$branch, "")[[1]]
    if (pos2path[1]!="0") {pos2path = c("0", pos2path)}
    loop = 1:min(length(pos1path), length(pos2path))
    loop = loop[-which(loop == 1)]

    CommonTrace="included"; for (i in loop) {
        if (pos1path[i] != pos2path[i]) {
            CommonTrace = i-1; break
            }
        }

    if(CommonTrace=="included"){
        CommonTrace = min(length(pos1path), length(pos2path))
        if (length(pos1path) > length(pos2path)) {
            longerpos = pos1; shorterpos = pos2; longerpospath = pos1path
        } else {
            longerpos = pos2; shorterpos = pos1; longerpospath = pos2path
        }
        distToNode = 0
        if ((CommonTrace+1) != length(longerpospath)){
            for (i in (CommonTrace+1):(length(longerpospath)-1)){
                distToNode = distToNode + tree$length[tree$branch == paste0(longerpospath[2:i], collapse='')]
            }   
        }
        Dist = distToNode + longerpos$length + (tree[tree$branch == shorterpos$branch,]$length-shorterpos$length)
        if (identical(shorterpos, pos1)){Dist=-Dist}
        return(Dist)
    } else { # if they are sisterbranch
        Dist=0 
        if((CommonTrace+1) != length(pos1path)){
            for (i in (CommonTrace+1):(length(pos1path)-1)){
                Dist = Dist + tree$length[tree$branch == paste0(pos1path[2:i], collapse='')]
            }   
        }
        if((CommonTrace+1) != length(pos2path)){
            for (i in (CommonTrace+1):(length(pos2path)-1)){
                Dist = Dist + tree$length[tree$branch == paste(pos2path[2:i], collapse='')]
            }
        }
        Dist = Dist + pos1$length + pos2$length
        return(Dist)
    }
}

I think the algorithm works fine but it is not very efficient. Note the sign of the distance that is important. This sign only makes sense when the two positions are not found on "sister branches". That is the sign makes sense only if one of the two positions is found in the way between the roots and the other position.

distance(tree, posA, posB) # -22

I then just loop through all positions of interest like that:

allpositions=rbind(tree, tree)
allpositions$length = c(1,5,8,2,2,3,5,6,7,8,2,3,1,2,5,6)
mat = matrix(-1, ncol=nrow(allpositions), nrow=nrow(allpositions))
    for (i in 1:nrow(allpositions)){
       for (j in 1:nrow(allpositions)){
          posA = allpositions[i,]
          posB = allpositions[j,]
          mat[i,j] = distance(tree, posA, posB)
       }
    }

#     1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16
# 1   0 -24 -39 -21 -40 -53 -55 -44 -6 -27 -33 -22 -39 -52 -55 -44
# 2  24   0 -15   7  26  39  41  30 18  -3  -9   8  25  38  41  30
# 3  39  15   0  22  41  54  56  45 33  12   6  23  40  53  56  45
# 4  21   7  22   0 -19 -32 -34 -23 15  10  16  -1 -18 -31 -34 -23
# 5  40  26  41  19   0 -13 -15   8 34  29  35  18   1 -12 -15   8
# 6  53  39  54  32  13   0   8  21 47  42  48  31  14   1   8  21
# 7  55  41  56  34  15   8   0  23 49  44  50  33  16   7   0  23
# 8  44  30  45  23   8  21  23   0 38  33  39  22   7  20  23   0
# 9   6 -18 -33 -15 -34 -47 -49 -38  0 -21 -27 -16 -33 -46 -49 -38
# 10 27   3 -12  10  29  42  44  33 21   0  -6  11  28  41  44  33
# 11 33   9  -6  16  35  48  50  39 27   6   0  17  34  47  50  39
# 12 22   8  23   1 -18 -31 -33 -22 16  11  17   0 -17 -30 -33 -22
# 13 39  25  40  18  -1 -14 -16   7 33  28  34  17   0 -13 -16   7
# 14 52  38  53  31  12  -1   7  20 46  41  47  30  13   0   7  20
# 15 55  41  56  34  15   8   0  23 49  44  50  33  16   7   0  23
# 16 44  30  45  23   8  21  23   0 38  33  39  22   7  20  23   0

As an example, let's consider the first and the third positions in the object allpositions. The distance between them is 39 (and -39) because an ant would need to walk 19 units on branch 0 and then walk 12 units on branch L and finally the ant would need to walk 8 units on branch LL. 19 + 12 + 8 = 39

The issue is that I have about 20 very big trees with about 50000 positions and I would like to calculate the distance between any two positions. There are therefore 20 * 50000^2 distances to compute. It takes forever! Can you help me to improve my code?

EDIT

Please let me know if anything is still unclear

tree is a description of a tree. The tree has branches of a certain length. The name of the branches (variable: branch) gives indication about the relationship between the branches. The branch RL is a "parent branch" of the two branches RLL and RLR, where R and L stand for right and left.

allpositions is an data.frame, where each line represents one independent position on the tree. You can think of the position of a squirrel. The position is defined by two information. 1) The branch (variable: branch) on which the squirrel is standing and the the distance between the beginning of the branch and the position of the squirrel (variable: length).

Three examples

Consider a first squirrel that is at position (variable: length) 8 on the branch RL (which length is 12) and a second squirrel that is at position (variable: length) 2 on the branch RLL or RLR. The distance between the two squirrels is 12 - 8 + 2 = 6 (or -6).

Consider a first squirrel that is at position (variable: length) 8 on the branch RL and a second squirrel that is at position (variable: length) 2 on the branch RR. The distance between the two squirrels is 8 + 2 = 10 (or -10).

Consider a first squirrel that is at position (variable: length) 8 on the branch R (which length is 19) and a second squirrel that is at position (variable: length) 2 on the branch RLL. Knowing the that branch RL has a length of 12, the distance between the two squirrels is 19 - 8 + 12 + 2 = 25 (or -25).

  • The posted code and data give me: Error in pos1$branch : $ operator is invalid for atomic vectors -- please update so this becomes a reproducible example. – josliber Apr 1 '15 at 22:44
  • Is your branch variable a vector of character? I think that might cause the issue. I added two lines so that it is clear on how to built the tree object. Did it solve the issue? Thanks for your comment. – Remi.b Apr 2 '15 at 0:52
  • I just copied the code you posted to create tree, copied your distance function, and got the error running distance(tree, 1, 2). – josliber Apr 2 '15 at 1:07
  • The function takes the arguments tree, pos1 and pos2. Try to run distance(tree, pos1, pos2). I relaunched R and it still works on my computer. Does it fail to work on yours? – Remi.b Apr 2 '15 at 1:13
  • Oh, I had assumed allpositions stored indices because you were using it to index into mat. If you had something like allpositions <- list(pos1, pos2), then your last chunk of code is not going to work (because mat[i,j] won't work). That is what was throwing me off. Could you update the last bit so it's runnable? This would involve adding allpositions and initializing mat. – josliber Apr 2 '15 at 1:16
0

The code below uses the igraph package to compute the distances between positions in tree and seems noticeably faster than the code you posted in your question. The approach is to create graph vertices at branch intersections and at positions along tree branches at the positions specified in allpositions. Graph edges are the branch segments between these vertices. It uses igraph to build a graph for the tree and allpositions and then finds the distances between the vertices corresponding to allposition data.

t.graph <- function(tree, positions) {
  library(igraph)
  #  Assign vertex name to tree branch intersections
  n_label <- nchar(tree$branch)
  tree$high_vert <- tree$branch
  tree$low_vert <- tree$branch
  tree$brnch_type <- "tree"
  for( i in 1:nrow(tree) ) {
    tree$low_vert[i] <- if(n_label[i] > 1) substr(tree$branch[i], 1, n_label[i]-1)
    else { if(tree$branch[i] %in% c("R","L")) "0"
           else "root" }
  }
  #  combine position data with tree data    
  positions$brnch_type <- "position"
  temp <- merge(positions, tree, by = "branch")
  positions <- temp[, c("branch","length.x","high_vert","low_vert","brnch_type.x")]
  positions$high_vert <- paste(positions$branch, positions$length.x, sep="_")
  colnames(positions) <- c("branch","length","high_vert","low_vert","brnch_type")
  tree <- rbind(tree, positions)
  #   use positions to segment tree branches    
  tree_brnch <- split(tree, tree$branch)
  tree <- data.frame( branch=NA_character_, length = NA_real_, high_vert = NA_character_, 
                      low_vert = NA_character_, brnch_type =NA_character_, seg_len= NA_real_)
  for( ib in 1: length(tree_brnch)) {
    brnch_seg <- tree_brnch[[ib]][order(tree_brnch[[ib]]$length, decreasing=TRUE), ]
    n_seg <- nrow(brnch_seg)
    brnch_seg$seg_len <- brnch_seg$length
    for( is in 1:(n_seg-1) ) {
      brnch_seg$seg_len[is] <- brnch_seg$length[is] - brnch_seg$length[is+1]
      brnch_seg$low_vert[is] <- brnch_seg$high_vert[is+1]
    }
    tree  <- rbind(tree, brnch_seg)
  }
  tree <- tree[-1,]
  #  Create graph of tree and positions
  tree_graph <- graph.data.frame(tree[,c("low_vert","high_vert")])  
  E(tree_graph)$label <- tree$high_vert
  E(tree_graph)$brnch_type <- tree$brnch_type
  E(tree_graph)$weight <- tree$seg_len
  #  calculate shortest distances between position vertices
  position_verts <- V(tree_graph)[grep("_", V(tree_graph)$name)] 
  vert_dist <- shortest.paths(tree_graph, v=position_verts, to=position_verts, mode="all")  
  return(dist_mat= vert_dist )
}

I've benchmarked igraph code ( the t.graph function) against the code posted in your question by making a function named Remi for your code over allposition data using your distance function. Sample trees were created as extensions of your tree and allpositions data for trees of 64, 256, and 2048 branches and allpositions equal to twice these sizes. Comparisons of execution times are shown below. Notice that times are in milliseconds.

 microbenchmark(matR16 <- Remi(tree, allpositions), matG16 <- t.graph(tree, allpositions),
                matR256 <- Remi(tree256, allpositions256), matG256 <- t.graph(tree256, allpositions256), times=2)
Unit: milliseconds
                                         expr          min           lq         mean       median           uq          max neval
           matR8 <- Remi(tree, allpositions)     58.82173     58.82173     59.92444     59.92444     61.02714     61.02714     2
        matG8 <- t.graph(tree, allpositions)     11.82064     11.82064     13.15275     13.15275     14.48486     14.48486     2
    matR256 <- Remi(tree256, allpositions256) 114795.50865 114795.50865 114838.99490 114838.99490 114882.48114 114882.48114     2
 matG256 <- t.graph(tree256, allpositions256)    379.54559    379.54559    379.76673    379.76673    379.98787    379.98787     2

Compared to the code you posted, the igraph results are only about 5 times faster for the 8 branch case but are over 300 times faster for 256 branches so igraph seems to scale better with size. I've also benchmarked the igraph code for the 2048 branch case with the following results. Again times are in milliseconds.

microbenchmark(matG8 <- t.graph(tree, allpositions), matG64 <- t.graph(tree64, allpositions64),
               matG256 <- t.graph(tree256, allpositions256),  matG2k <- t.graph(tree2k, allpositions2k), times=2)
Unit: milliseconds
                                         expr         min          lq        mean      median          uq         max neval
         matG8 <- t.graph(tree, allpositions)    11.78072    11.78072    12.00599    12.00599    12.23126    12.23126     2
    matG64 <- t.graph(tree64, allpositions64)    73.29006    73.29006    73.49409    73.49409    73.69812    73.69812     2
 matG256 <- t.graph(tree256, allpositions256)   377.21756   377.21756   410.01268   410.01268   442.80780   442.80780     2
    matG2k <- t.graph(tree2k, allpositions2k) 11311.05758 11311.05758 11362.93701 11362.93701 11414.81645 11414.81645     2

so the distance matrix for about 4000 positions is calculated in less than 12 seconds. t.graph returns the distance matrix where the rows and columns of the matrix are labeled by branch names - position on the branch so for example

      0_7 0_1 L_8 L_5 LL_8 LL_2 R_3 R_2 RL_2 RL_1 RLL_3 RLL_2 RLR_5 RR_6
L_5    18  24   3   0   15    9   8   7   26   25    39    38    41   30

shows the distances from L-5, the position 5 units along the L branch, to the other positions. I don't know that this will handle your largest cases, but it may be helpful for some. You also have problems with the storage requirements for your largest cases.

  • In reality I won't have to calculate the distance for the sister branches. That means that the number of distance to be calculated 50000^2 can be reduced to about (5000/4)^2 (the first division by two is for all pair of positions that are on sister branches and the second is for accounting to the fact that the lower triangular of the matrix will just contain the same information that the upper triangular but the opposite signs). I can also substract the diagonal so by the end for $n$ positions there are $(n/4 - n)^2$ distances to calculate (but all values have to be stored). – Remi.b Apr 2 '15 at 15:59
  • The matrices are input to a software I am using and I've been through the code of this software and asked the author; there is no easy way to not indicate all pairwise distances. However, I will create the 20 matrices sequentially so this won't lead to any memory issue and I can run the construction of these matrices and the software on machines that have lots of RAM (14gb I think), so it shouldn't be too much of a problem. Also, there is no exact number of positions I want to achieve, I just want to have as many as possible. So the thing I really need is an efficient algorithm. Thank you – Remi.b Apr 2 '15 at 16:01

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