11

This question is specifically about C++ architecture on embedded, hard real-time systems. This implies that large parts of the data-structures as well as the exact program-flow are given at compile-time, performance is important and a lot of code can be inlined. Solutions preferably use C++03 only, but C++11 inputs are also welcome.

I am looking for established design-patterns and solutions to the architectural problem where the same code-base should be re-used for several, closely related products, while some parts (e.g. the hardware-abstraction) will necessarily be different.

I will likely end up with a hierarchical structure of modules encapsulated in classes that might then look somehow like this, assuming 4 layers:

Product A                       Product B

Toplevel_A                      Toplevel_B                  (different for A and B, but with common parts)
    Middle_generic                  Middle_generic          (same for A and B)
        Sub_generic                     Sub_generic         (same for A and B)
            Hardware_A                      Hardware_B      (different for A and B)

Here, some classes inherit from a common base class (e.g. Toplevel_A from Toplevel_base) while others do not need to be specialized at all (e.g. Middle_generic).

Currently I can think of the following approaches:

  • (A): If this was a regular desktop-application, I would use virtual inheritance and create the instances at run-time, using e.g. an Abstract Factory.

    Drawback: However the *_B classes will never be used in product A and hence the dereferencing of all the virtual function calls and members not linked to an address at run-time will lead to quite some overhead.

  • (B) Using template specialization as inheritance mechanism (e.g. CRTP)

    template<class Derived>
    class Toplevel  { /* generic stuff ... */ };
    
    class Toplevel_A : public Toplevel<Toplevel_A> { /* specific stuff ... */ };
    

    Drawback: Hard to understand.

  • (C): Use different sets of matching files and let the build-scripts include the right one

    // common/toplevel_base.h
    class Toplevel_base { /* ... */ };
    
    // product_A/toplevel.h
    class Toplevel : Toplevel_base { /* ... */ };
    
    // product_B/toplevel.h
    class Toplevel : Toplevel_base { /* ... */ };
    
    // build_script.A
    compiler -Icommon -Iproduct_A
    

    Drawback: Confusing, tricky to maintain and test.

  • (D): One big typedef (or #define) file

    //typedef_A.h
    typedef Toplevel_A Toplevel_to_be_used;
    typedef Hardware_A Hardware_to_be_used;
    // etc.
    
    // sub_generic.h
    class sub_generic {
        Hardware_to_be_used the_hardware;
        // etc.
    };
    

    Drawback: One file to be included everywhere and still the need of another mechnism to actually switch between different configurations.

  • (E): A similar, "Policy based" configuration, e.g.

    template <class Policy>
    class Toplevel { 
        Middle_generic<Policy> the_middle;
        // ...
    };
    
    // ...
    
    template <class Policy>
    class Sub_generic {
        class Policy::Hardware_to_be_used the_hardware;
        // ... 
    };
    
    // used as
    class Policy_A {
        typedef Hardware_A Hardware_to_be_used;
    };
    Toplevel<Policy_A> the_toplevel;
    

    Drawback: Everything is a template now; a lot of code needs to be re-compiled every time.

  • (F): Compiler switch and preprocessor

    // sub_generic.h
    class Sub_generic {
        #if PRODUCT_IS_A
            Hardware_A _hardware;
        #endif
        #if PRODUCT_IS_B
            Hardware_B _hardware;
        #endif
    };
    

    Drawback: Brrr..., only if all else fails.

Is there any (other) established design-pattern or a better solution to this problem, such that the compiler can statically allocate as many objects as possible and inline large parts of the code, knowing which product is being built and which classes are going to be used?

  • 2
    Regarding (E) you can use explicit instantiation, and so you can leave only declarations in the headers. – Anton Savin Apr 1 '15 at 21:38
  • 1
    I think your reasons for dismissing B and E (policy one) are a little biased against templates. You can't always have crystal clear simple code that compiles super fast. B and E both seem like maintainable and valid solutions. – Prismatic Apr 1 '15 at 21:41
  • @Pris: I'm actually quite biased towards the template solutions, I just didn't want the question to be biased, in the hope to get some fresh input and open feedback. – mbschenkel Apr 3 '15 at 20:38
3

First I would like to point out that you basically answered your own question in the question :-)

Next I would like to point out that in C++

the exact program-flow are given at compile-time, performance is important and a lot of code can be inlined

is called templates. The other approaches that leverage language features as opposed to build system features will serve only as a logical way of structuring the code in your project to the benefit of developers.

Further, as noted in other answers C is more common for hard real-time systems than are C++, and in C it is customary to rely on MACROS to make this kind of optimization at compile time.

Finally, you have noted under your B solution above that template specialization is hard to understand. I would argue that this depends on how you do it and also on how much experience your team has on C++/templates. I find many "template ridden" projects to be extremely hard to read and the error messages they produce to be unholy at best, but I still manage to make effective use of templates in my own projects because I respect the KISS principle while doing it.

So my answer to you is, go with B or ditch C++ for C

  • I like the expression "template socialization" :-) – mbschenkel Apr 10 '15 at 15:48
  • Oops :-) will fix it – Lennart Rolland Apr 10 '15 at 15:49
7

I'd go for A. Until it's PROVEN that this is not good enough, go for the same decisions as for desktop (well, of course, allocating several kilobytes on the stack, or using global variables that are many megabytes large may be "obvious" that it's not going to work). Yes, there is SOME overhead in calling virtual functions, but I would go for the most obvious and natural C++ solution FIRST, then redesign if it's not "good enough" (obviously, try to determine performance and such early on, and use tools like a sampling profiler to determine where you are spending time, rather than "guessing" - humans are proven pretty poor guessers).

I'd then move to option B if A is proven to not work. This is indeed not entirely obvious, but it is, roughly, how LLVM/Clang solves this problem for combinations of hardware and OS, see: https://github.com/llvm-mirror/clang/blob/master/lib/Basic/Targets.cpp

3
+50

I understand that you have two important requirements :

  1. Data types are known at compile time
  2. Program-flow is known at compile time

The CRTP wouldn't really address the problem you are trying to solve as it would allow the HardwareLayer to call methods on the Sub_generic, Middle_generic or TopLevel and I don't believe it is what you are looking for.

Both of your requirements can be met using the Trait pattern (another reference). Here is an example proving both requirements are met. First, we define empty shells representing two Hardwares you might want to support.

class Hardware_A {};
class Hardware_B {};

Then let's consider a class that describes a general case which corresponds to Hardware_A.

template <typename Hardware>
class HardwareLayer
{
public:
    typedef long int64_t;

    static int64_t getCPUSerialNumber() {return 0;}
};

Now let's see a specialization for Hardware_B :

template <>
class HardwareLayer<Hardware_B>
{
public:
    typedef int int64_t;

    static int64_t getCPUSerialNumber() {return 1;}
};

Now, here is a usage example within the Sub_generic layer :

template <typename Hardware>
class Sub_generic
{
public:
    typedef HardwareLayer<Hardware> HwLayer;
    typedef typename HwLayer::int64_t int64_t;

    int64_t doSomething() {return HwLayer::getCPUSerialNumber();}
};

And finally, a short main that executes both code paths and use both data types :

int main(int argc, const char * argv[]) {
    std::cout << "Hardware_A : " << Sub_generic<Hardware_A>().doSomething() << std::endl;
    std::cout << "Hardware_B : " << Sub_generic<Hardware_B>().doSomething() << std::endl;
}

Now if your HardwareLayer needs to maintain state, here is another way to implement the HardLayer and Sub_generic layer classes.

template <typename Hardware>
class HardwareLayer
{
public:
    typedef long hwint64_t;

    hwint64_t getCPUSerialNumber() {return mySerial;}

private:
    hwint64_t mySerial = 0;
};

template <>
class HardwareLayer<Hardware_B>
{
public:
    typedef int hwint64_t;

    hwint64_t getCPUSerialNumber() {return mySerial;}

private:
    hwint64_t mySerial = 1;
};

template <typename Hardware>
class Sub_generic : public HardwareLayer<Hardware>
{
public:
    typedef HardwareLayer<Hardware> HwLayer;
    typedef typename HwLayer::hwint64_t hwint64_t;

    hwint64_t doSomething() {return HwLayer::getCPUSerialNumber();}
};

And here is a last variant where only the Sub_generic implementation changes :

template <typename Hardware>
class Sub_generic
{
public:
    typedef HardwareLayer<Hardware> HwLayer;
    typedef typename HwLayer::hwint64_t hwint64_t;

    hwint64_t doSomething() {return hw.getCPUSerialNumber();}

private:
    HwLayer hw;
};
  • This might work, although I'm afraid that I would have to pass around a lot of template arguments if I decide to split up <typename Hardware> into orthogonal aspects such as <typename Processor, typename Physical_Link, typename FPGA> and pass them down the whole hierarchy. The second last proposal (Sub inheriting from Hardware) I don't really see though, as I would definitely have more than one class per layer and inheriting from all of them would be strange. (That aspect is maybe not very clear from the question, sorry) – mbschenkel Apr 4 '15 at 8:59
  • To address your concern, you can also split up the HardwareLayer class into multiple base classes the following way : template typename<Hardware> class HardwareLayer : public Physical_Link<Hardware>, public Processor<Hardware>, public FPGA<Hardware>. – Dalzhim Apr 4 '15 at 18:06
  • 1
    With quite some viable yet controversial solutions beijing proposed, it's hard for me to award the bounty... However, I decided for this answer, because it is valid and shows some actual code. – mbschenkel Apr 10 '15 at 19:33
2

On a similar train of thought to F, you could just have a directory layout like this:

Hardware/
  common/inc/hardware.h
  hardware1/src/hardware.cpp
  hardware2/src/hardware.cpp

Simplify the interface to only assume a single hardware exists:

// sub_generic.h
class Sub_generic {
        Hardware _hardware;
};

And then only compile the folder that contains the .cpp files for the hardware for that platform.

The benefits to this approach are:

  • It's simple to understand whats happening and to add a hardware3
  • hardware.h still serves as your API
  • It takes away the abstraction from the compiler (for your speed concerns)
  • Compiler 1 doesn't need to compile hardware2.cpp or hardware3.cpp which may contain things Compiler 1 can't do (like inline assembly, or some other specific Compiler 2 thing)
  • hardware3 might be much more complicated for some reason you haven't considered yet.. so giving it a whole directory structure encapsulates it.
  • This is similar to what I suggested as (C), right? This could indeed be a lightwight solution, I'm just a bit afraid when it comes to things like tests that would include source from multiple products or IDE support (how does it know which files to in-/exclude?) – mbschenkel Apr 8 '15 at 15:54
  • That's a good question. My personal experience has generally been to use this approach with multiple very different platforms that required different IDE's and compilers. (For example, one case would be a visual studio build targeted at x86 Windows, the other being a gcc build targeted at some ARM embedded device). So for the gcc build I would build everything under hardware2/src/*.cpp, and for visual studio I would build everything under hardware1/src/*.cpp. – Hashtag Apr 9 '15 at 0:12
  • As far as tests go.. I usually have two sets of tests. Tests that are generic enough that they could sit with the application code (like serial loop-back or something). Then another set of tests that were directed at that specific hardware and would sit in the hardware code. Or are you referring more to unit testing of the code itself? That is close to impossible when you get close enough to the hardware as I would think everything in hardware.cpp is going to be speaking directly to hardware or to some OS function that might be hard to virtualize. (I don't know what your code is though) – Hashtag Apr 9 '15 at 0:16
  • Well, I was just trying to play devils advocat and find a situation where this leads to problems. And one such case could be an integration test or a simulation that instantiates all the possible combinations at once. But of course such a test could also just be split up into different targets. We are using the same CPU-board for all products, only the machine being controlled is different. – mbschenkel Apr 10 '15 at 19:22
  • Oh, I was confused about what the code was doing. I was assuming this was OS/BSP related stuff. If this is an interface to how equipment it is controlling works (not the hardware of the board you are running on) I would not recommend my solution. I like the train of thought you originally had. Especially since if you find out that space isn't as much of an issue you may at some point find out you want it settable at runtime (or factory configuration) so you would only need one set of firmware and would make testing easier. – Hashtag Apr 10 '15 at 20:50
2

Since this is for a hard real time embedded system, usually you would go for a C type of solution not c++.

With modern compilers I'd say that the overhead of c++ is not that great, so it's not entirely a matter of performance, but embedded systems tend to prefer c instead of c++. What you are trying to build would resemble a classic device drivers library (like the one for ftdi chips).

The approach there would be (since it's written in C) something similar to your F, but with no compile time options - you would specialize the code, at runtime, based on somethig like PID, VID, SN, etc...

Now if you what to use c++ for this, templates should probably be your last option (code readability usually ranks higher than any advantage templates bring to the table). So you would probably go for something similar to A: a basic class inheritance scheme, but no particularly fancy design pattern is required.

Hope this helps...

  • Well, we are explicitly migrating from C to C++ and even if we just use a small subset of its features, that is justified in my opinion. However, this particular question is one where I'm not completely sure yet how to leverage it best. What do you mean with "PID, VID, SN" by the way? – mbschenkel Apr 8 '15 at 15:59
  • Product ID, Vendor ID, Serial Number; basically anything that would allow to uniquely identify a device family or device (if you need to differentiate between identical devices). – Pandrei Apr 9 '15 at 8:29
0

I am going to assume that these classes only need to be created a single time, and that their instances persist throughout the entire program run time.

In this case I would recommend using the Object Factory pattern since the factory will only get run one time to create the class. From that point on the specialized classes are all a known type.

  • Not my downvote, but I would also try to avoid a factory, because it would be used only once and create the objects on the stack or heap, while I would prefer them to be statically allocated in the data segment. – mbschenkel Apr 10 '15 at 19:11
  • I figured the Factory method had been disregarded for some reason, but thought it might be worth mentioning. As a note my preference would be the option B that was proposed. – travisco_nabisco Apr 10 '15 at 19:51

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.