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I'm looking for a JavaScript read-evaluate-print loop for development prototyping.

For now, I am using the Firebug Console, the Firefox Developer Tools Web Console, repl.it, jsFiddle, plunker, or one of the other online tools.

The problem is that a Firefox console is linked to the tab/window on which I opened it. The web based ones have restrictions too; for instance, jsFiddle.net doesn't show console output and repl.it does not let me use Fiddler to watch an XMLHttpRequest.

What I would like is a Windows desktop application that is very similar to the PowerShell ISE but that runs JavaScript instead.

+-------------------------------+----------------------------------+
|                               |                                  |
|  JavaScript to Run            |  Console Output                  |
|                               |                                  |
|                               |                                  |
|                               |                                  |
|                               |                                  |
|                               |                                  |
|                               |                                  |
|                               |                                  |
|                               |                                  |
|                               |                                  |
|                               |                                  |
|                               |                                  |
|                               |                                  |
|                               |                                  |
+-------------------------------+----------------------------------+

It still needs to have the same functionality as the Firebug Console or Firefox Web Console. I.e. it needs to evaluate JavaScript, output console messages, and send HTTP requests via XMLHttpRequest. Does this exist? Where can I get it?

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  • 1
    You could try using node.js. Run the node command from a terminal and you have a console, otherwise just write a script and run it. With a proxy set up you could watch it with fiddler. Obviously you won't have DOM access or any of the other browser unique features.
    – quw
    Apr 2, 2015 at 1:18
  • That's a good idea. Maybe node.js combined with Vim would make a workable solution. Edit in vim, then use it's command line to run. I've also downloaded PhantoJS as an attempt. Apr 2, 2015 at 1:20
  • @quantumwannabe I ended up using PhantomJS, because it doesn't require me to setup a proxy. Apr 2, 2015 at 17:38

2 Answers 2

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I ended up using PhantomJS, Notepad, and the Windows Command Line. First, install PhantomJS. Then...

Edit

  1. Open Notepad.
  2. Create a JavaScript file.
  3. Type console.log('foo');
  4. Save.

Run

  1. Open the Command Line.
  2. Run phantomjs myfiddle.js.
  3. Press Ctrl + C to exit phantom.

Repeat

  1. Switch to Notepad. Edit. Save.
  2. Switch to Command Line. Run.

Here is a screen shot of a streamlined process running on my machine.

enter image description here

It works with XMLHttpRequests, I can inspect the request with Fiddler, and the nice-to-have is that we can adapt it for use with Vim to create an integrated scripting environment.

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As a professional developer, I have to point out this makes absolutely no sense. The code you write is not going to be understandable or meaningful in terms of "console output", unless you write toy code, or what you want is actually a live-reloading server environment, where you write html+js, and you want the browser to autoreload when you save updated files. In which case live-server may already be all you need.

If, on the other hand, what you need is a REPL like python or the like, then just Node.js is literally what you want. But then that doesn't make the most sense because why on earth would you edit your source code in a REPL instead of using a code editor...?

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  • It makes sense for a few use cases. For instance, In wanting to quickly test cross-origin requests console output is all I need. E.g. this fiddle could print to the console instead of writing to the DOM. There's other examples, too, if you'd like I can add them. Apr 2, 2015 at 15:45
  • sure, and that's a single test of.. what? what's running the code that's accepting the request, for instance? Node.js has a debug mode that lets you run your code right until it sees the debugger statement, and will interrupt the run so you can fire up the REPL, type whatever you want including console logs, and then exit the REPL again to continue regular program flow. Apr 2, 2015 at 15:49
  • It's a single test of whether the CORS is working. In the Fiddle, I imagine that Fiddler has a JavaScript evaluator to run the code that accepts the test. It sounds like Node.js is an option here and I'm going to give it a shot. Thanks. Apr 2, 2015 at 15:55
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    yeah, I'd say give that a spin. The debugger functionality is actually explained in the API docs (not the most obvious place for it, but it's useful nevertheless) Apr 2, 2015 at 15:59

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