This piece of Haskell code runs much slower with -O, but -O should be non-dangerous. Can anyone tell me what happened? If it matters, it is an attempt to solve this problem, and it uses binary search and persistent segment tree:

import Control.Monad
import Data.Array

data Node =
      Leaf   Int           -- value
    | Branch Int Node Node -- sum, left child, right child
type NodeArray = Array Int Node

-- create an empty node with range [l, r)
create :: Int -> Int -> Node
create l r
    | l + 1 == r = Leaf 0
    | otherwise  = Branch 0 (create l m) (create m r)
    where m = (l + r) `div` 2

-- Get the sum in range [0, r). The range of the node is [nl, nr)
sumof :: Node -> Int -> Int -> Int -> Int
sumof (Leaf val) r nl nr
    | nr <= r   = val
    | otherwise = 0
sumof (Branch sum lc rc) r nl nr
    | nr <= r   = sum
    | r  > nl   = (sumof lc r nl m) + (sumof rc r m nr)
    | otherwise = 0
    where m = (nl + nr) `div` 2

-- Increase the value at x by 1. The range of the node is [nl, nr)
increase :: Node -> Int -> Int -> Int -> Node
increase (Leaf val) x nl nr = Leaf (val + 1)
increase (Branch sum lc rc) x nl nr
    | x < m     = Branch (sum + 1) (increase lc x nl m) rc
    | otherwise = Branch (sum + 1) lc (increase rc x m nr)
    where m = (nl + nr) `div` 2

-- signature said it all
tonodes :: Int -> [Int] -> [Node]
tonodes n = reverse . tonodes' . reverse
    where
        tonodes' :: [Int] -> [Node]
        tonodes' (h:t) = increase h' h 0 n : s' where s'@(h':_) = tonodes' t
        tonodes' _ = [create 0 n]

-- find the minimum m in [l, r] such that (predicate m) is True
binarysearch :: (Int -> Bool) -> Int -> Int -> Int
binarysearch predicate l r
    | l == r      = r
    | predicate m = binarysearch predicate l m
    | otherwise   = binarysearch predicate (m+1) r
    where m = (l + r) `div` 2

-- main, literally
main :: IO ()
main = do
    [n, m] <- fmap (map read . words) getLine
    nodes <- fmap (listArray (0, n) . tonodes n . map (subtract 1) . map read . words) getLine
    replicateM_ m $ query n nodes
    where
        query :: Int -> NodeArray -> IO ()
        query n nodes = do
            [p, k] <- fmap (map read . words) getLine
            print $ binarysearch (ok nodes n p k) 0 n
            where
                ok :: NodeArray -> Int -> Int -> Int -> Int -> Bool
                ok nodes n p k s = (sumof (nodes ! min (p + s + 1) n) s 0 n) - (sumof (nodes ! max (p - s) 0) s 0 n) >= k

(This is exactly the same code with code review but this question addresses another problem.)

This is my input generator in C++:

#include <cstdio>
#include <cstdlib>
using namespace std;
int main (int argc, char * argv[]) {
    srand(1827);
    int n = 100000;
    if(argc > 1)
        sscanf(argv[1], "%d", &n);
    printf("%d %d\n", n, n);
    for(int i = 0; i < n; i++)
        printf("%d%c", rand() % n + 1, i == n - 1 ? '\n' : ' ');
    for(int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        int p = rand() % n;
        int k = rand() % n + 1;
        printf("%d %d\n", p, k);
    }
}

In case you don't have a C++ compiler available, this is the result of ./gen.exe 1000.

This is the execution result on my computer:

$ ghc --version
The Glorious Glasgow Haskell Compilation System, version 7.8.3
$ ghc -fforce-recomp 1827.hs
[1 of 1] Compiling Main             ( 1827.hs, 1827.o )
Linking 1827.exe ...
$ time ./gen.exe 1000 | ./1827.exe > /dev/null
real    0m0.088s
user    0m0.015s
sys     0m0.015s
$ ghc -fforce-recomp -O 1827.hs
[1 of 1] Compiling Main             ( 1827.hs, 1827.o )
Linking 1827.exe ...
$ time ./gen.exe 1000 | ./1827.exe > /dev/null
real    0m2.969s
user    0m0.000s
sys     0m0.045s

And this is the heap profile summary:

$ ghc -fforce-recomp -rtsopts ./1827.hs
[1 of 1] Compiling Main             ( 1827.hs, 1827.o )
Linking 1827.exe ...
$ ./gen.exe 1000 | ./1827.exe +RTS -s > /dev/null
      70,207,096 bytes allocated in the heap
       2,112,416 bytes copied during GC
         613,368 bytes maximum residency (3 sample(s))
          28,816 bytes maximum slop
               3 MB total memory in use (0 MB lost due to fragmentation)
                                    Tot time (elapsed)  Avg pause  Max pause
  Gen  0       132 colls,     0 par    0.00s    0.00s     0.0000s    0.0004s
  Gen  1         3 colls,     0 par    0.00s    0.00s     0.0006s    0.0010s
  INIT    time    0.00s  (  0.00s elapsed)
  MUT     time    0.03s  (  0.03s elapsed)
  GC      time    0.00s  (  0.01s elapsed)
  EXIT    time    0.00s  (  0.00s elapsed)
  Total   time    0.03s  (  0.04s elapsed)
  %GC     time       0.0%  (14.7% elapsed)
  Alloc rate    2,250,213,011 bytes per MUT second
  Productivity 100.0% of total user, 83.1% of total elapsed
$ ghc -fforce-recomp -O -rtsopts ./1827.hs
[1 of 1] Compiling Main             ( 1827.hs, 1827.o )
Linking 1827.exe ...
$ ./gen.exe 1000 | ./1827.exe +RTS -s > /dev/null
   6,009,233,608 bytes allocated in the heap
     622,682,200 bytes copied during GC
         443,240 bytes maximum residency (505 sample(s))
          48,256 bytes maximum slop
               3 MB total memory in use (0 MB lost due to fragmentation)
                                    Tot time (elapsed)  Avg pause  Max pause
  Gen  0     10945 colls,     0 par    0.72s    0.63s     0.0001s    0.0004s
  Gen  1       505 colls,     0 par    0.16s    0.13s     0.0003s    0.0005s
  INIT    time    0.00s  (  0.00s elapsed)
  MUT     time    2.00s  (  2.13s elapsed)
  GC      time    0.87s  (  0.76s elapsed)
  EXIT    time    0.00s  (  0.00s elapsed)
  Total   time    2.89s  (  2.90s elapsed)
  %GC     time      30.3%  (26.4% elapsed)
  Alloc rate    3,009,412,603 bytes per MUT second
  Productivity  69.7% of total user, 69.4% of total elapsed
  • 1
    Thank you for including the GHC version! – dfeuer Apr 2 '15 at 2:37
  • 2
    @dfeuer The result is now inlined into my question. – johnchen902 Apr 2 '15 at 2:54
  • 12
    One more option to try: -fno-state-hack. Then I'll have to actually try looking into details. – dfeuer Apr 2 '15 at 3:34
  • 17
    I don't know too many details, but basically it's a heuristic for guessing that certain functions that your program creates (namely ones hidden in the IO or ST types) get called only once. It's usually a good guess, but when it's a bad guess, GHC can produce very bad code. The developers have been trying to find a way to get the good without the bad for quite a long time. I think Joachim Breitner is working on it these days. – dfeuer Apr 2 '15 at 3:54
  • 1
    This looks very much like ghc.haskell.org/trac/ghc/ticket/10102. Note that both programs use replicateM_, and there GHC will wrongly move computation from outside the replicateM_ to inside it, hence repeating it. – Joachim Breitner Apr 20 '15 at 20:01
up vote 39 down vote accepted

I guess it is time this question gets a proper answer.

What happened to your code with -O

Let me zoom in your main function, and rewrite it slightly:

main :: IO ()
main = do
    [n, m] <- fmap (map read . words) getLine
    line <- getLine
    let nodes = listArray (0, n) . tonodes n . map (subtract 1) . map read . words $ line
    replicateM_ m $ query n nodes

Clearly, the intention here is that the NodeArray is created once, and then used in every of the m invocations of query.

Unfortunately, GHC transforms this code to, effectively,

main = do
    [n, m] <- fmap (map read . words) getLine
    line <- getLine
    replicateM_ m $ do
        let nodes = listArray (0, n) . tonodes n . map (subtract 1) . map read . words $ line
        query n nodes

and you can immediately see the problem here.

What is the state hack, and why does it destroy my programs performance

The reason is the state hack, which says (roughly): “When something is of type IO a, assume it is called only once.”. The official documentation is not much more elaborate:

-fno-state-hack

Turn off the "state hack" whereby any lambda with a State# token as argument is considered to be single-entry, hence it is considered OK to inline things inside it. This can improve performance of IO and ST monad code, but it runs the risk of reducing sharing.

Roughly, the idea is as follows: If you define a function with an IO type and a where clause, e.g.

foo x = do
    putStrLn y
    putStrLn y
  where y = ...x...

Something of type IO a can be viewed as something of type RealWord -> (a, RealWorld). In that view, the above becomes (roughly)

foo x = 
   let y = ...x... in 
   \world1 ->
     let (world2, ()) = putStrLn y world1
     let (world3, ()) = putStrLn y world2
     in  (world3, ())

A call to foo would (typically) look like this foo argument world. But the definition of foo only takes one argument, and the other one is only consumed later by a local lambda expression! That is going to be a very slow call to foo. It would be much faster if the code would look like this:

foo x world1 = 
   let y = ...x... in 
   let (world2, ()) = putStrLn y world1
   let (world3, ()) = putStrLn y world2
   in  (world3, ())

This is called eta-expansion and done on various grounds (e.g. by analyzing the function’s definition, by checking how it is being called, and – in this case – type directed heuristics).

Unfortunately it is unsound if the call to foo is actually of the form let fooArgument = foo argument, i.e. with an argument, but no world passed (yet). In the original code, if fooArgument is then used several times, y will still be calculated only once, and shared. In the modified code, y will be re-calculated every time – precisely what has happened to your nodes.

Can things be fixed?

Possibly. See #9388 for an attempt at doing so. The problem with fixing it is that it will cost performance in a lot of cases where the transformation happens to ok, even though the compiler cannot possibly know that for sure. And there are probably cases where it is technically not ok, i.e. sharing is lost, but it is still beneficial because the speedups from the faster calling outweigh the extra cost of the recalculation. So it is not clear where to go from here.

  • 3
    Very interesting! But I haven't understood quite well why: "the other one is only consumed later by a local lambda expression! That is going to be a very slow call to foo"? – imz -- Ivan Zakharyaschev Jun 3 '15 at 9:09
  • Is there any workaround for a particular local case? -f-no-state-hack when compiling seems pretty heavy weight. {-# NOINLINE #-} seems like the obvious thing but I can't think of how to apply it here. Perhaps it would be enough just to make nodes an IO action and rely on the sequencing of >>=? – Barend Venter Jun 4 '15 at 4:01
  • I have also seen that replacing replicateM_ n foo with forM_ (\_ -> foo) [1..n] helps. – Joachim Breitner Jun 4 '15 at 7:01

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