12

I frequently need to align the start of a dynamic array to a 16, 32, or 64 Byte boundary for vectorization, e.g., for SSE, AVX, AVX-512. I am looking for a transparent and safe way to use this in conjunction with smart pointers, in particular std::unique_ptr.

Given an implementation of allocation and deallocation routines, say

template<class T>
T * allocate_aligned(int alignment, int length)
{
    // omitted: check minimum alignment, check error
    T * raw = 0;
    // using posix_memalign as an example, could be made platform dependent...
    int error = posix_memalign((void **)&raw, alignment, sizeof(T)*length);
    return raw;
}

template<class T>
struct DeleteAligned
{
    void operator()(T * data) const
    {
        free(data);
    }
};

I would like to do something like this

std::unique_ptr<float[]> data(allocate_aligned<float>(alignment, length));

but I could not figure out how to do get unique_ptr to use the proper Deleter without requiring from the user to specify it (which is a potential cause for errors). The alternative I found was to use a template alias

template<class T>
using aligned_unique_ptr = std::unique_ptr<T[], DeleteAligned<T>>;

Then we can use

aligned_unique_ptr<float> data(allocate_aligned<float>(alignment, length));

The remaining problem is that nothing keeps the user from putting the raw pointer into a std::unique_ptr.

Apart from that, do you see anything wrong with this? Is there an alternative which is less error prone, but completely transparent to the user after the allocation was done?

1
  • I am not sure whether I understood the answer. If I use make_unique or make_shared do I get a dynamic array that is aligned by default with std17 ?
    – gansub
    May 15, 2019 at 2:05

1 Answer 1

10

You should never return an owning raw pointer. allocate_aligned violates that. Change it to return the appropriate smart pointer instead:

template<class T>
std::unique_ptr<T[], DeleteAligned<T>> allocate_aligned(int alignment, int length)
{
    // omitted: check minimum alignment, check error
    T * raw = 0;
    // using posix_memalign as an example, could be made platform dependent...
    int error = posix_memalign((void **)&raw, alignment, sizeof(T)*length);
    return std::unique_ptr<T[], DeleteAligned<T>>{raw};
}

This way, no client can put the raw pointer into an inappropriate smart pointer because they never get the raw pointer in the first place. And you prevent memory leaks from accidentally not putting the raw pointer in a smart one at all.

As @KonradRudolph pointed out, the standard itself is going this way—in C++14, std::make_unique is exactly such a wrapper for plain new.

5
  • 2
    It might be worth mentioning that this is essentially what std::make_unique is doing for new in C++14. Apr 2, 2015 at 10:14
  • @Angew I am using C++ 17. I need to work with AVX instructions. When I call make_shared does it automatically do the alignment along a boundary?
    – gansub
    May 15, 2019 at 2:17
  • @gansub According to the standard, std::make_shared<T> "Allocates memory suitable for an object of type T and constructs an object in that memory ...". And std::make_unique<T> does exactly new T. There are no more specific alignment guarantees. May 15, 2019 at 7:11
  • @Angew. Interesting. I checked google and SO and there does not seem to be a question on this topic. You reckon I can go ahead and ask it ?
    – gansub
    May 15, 2019 at 7:13
  • @gansub Most likely yes. Just treat it as any other SO question, showing prior research etc. May 15, 2019 at 7:14

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