3
<?php

    $db = new PDO($dsn,$username,$password);
    $uname='avi';
    $age=19;
    $stmt = $db->prepare('INSERT INTO table(uname,age) VALUES(:uname,:age)');
    $stmt->execute(array(':uname'=>$uname,':age'=>$age));

    $stmt = $db->prepare('INSERT INTO table(uname,age) VALUES(?,?)');
    $stmt->execute(array($uname,$age));

    $stmt = $db->prepare('INSERT INTO table(uname,age) VALUES(:uname,:age)');
    $stmt->bindValue(':uname',$uname); //can be $uname or just 'avi'
    $stmt->binParam(':age',$uname); //cannot be 'avi' or value only
    $stmt->execute();

?>

When should we use bindParam()? All the previous methods seem to be easier and require less lines of code.

Whats the benefit of using bindParam() over other methods(bindValue(), execute())?

  • why have screws when you could just use nails? It's just different ways of getting the same thing accomplished. – Marc B Apr 2 '15 at 22:06
  • Yes but plenty of sites and some examples here in SO make use of bindParam when should I use bindParam? SOme exmaple in php documentation show it being used with stored Procedure that return values – AAB Apr 2 '15 at 22:08
  • different uses for different cases. in totally non-functional code, bindParam() is kind of like doing :foo &= $var. the foo param will be a reference to $var and simply pluck whatever value is in the variable at the time you call execute(). The ->exec(array(...)) version uses the variable values at that time. – Marc B Apr 2 '15 at 22:11
  • If I use stored procedures can I use bindValue to store the return value in desired variables – AAB Apr 2 '15 at 22:11
4

bindParam() binds the parameter by reference, so it will be evaluated at $stmt->execute(), which is unlike bindValue() which evaluates at the call of the function itself.

So as an example:

bindParam:

<?php

    try {

        $dbh = new PDO("mysql:host=localhost;dbname=test", "root", "");
        $dbh->setAttribute(PDO::ATTR_ERRMODE, PDO::ERRMODE_EXCEPTION);

        $stmt = $dbh->prepare("SELECT * FROM test WHERE number = ?");
        $stmt->bindParam(1, $xy, PDO::PARAM_INT);
        $xy = 123;  //See here variable is defined after it has been bind
        $stmt->execute();

        print_r($stmt->fetchAll());

    } catch(PDOException $e) {
        echo $e->getMessage();
    }

?>

works great!

bindValue:

<?php

    try {

        $dbh = new PDO("mysql:host=localhost;dbname=test", "root", "");
        $dbh->setAttribute(PDO::ATTR_ERRMODE, PDO::ERRMODE_EXCEPTION);

        $stmt = $dbh->prepare("SELECT * FROM test WHERE number = ?");
        $stmt->bindValue(1, $xy, PDO::PARAM_INT);
        $xy = 123;  //See here variable is defined after it has been bind
        $stmt->execute();

        print_r($stmt->fetchAll());

    } catch(PDOException $e) {
        echo $e->getMessage();
    }

?>

output:

Notice: Undefined variable: xy

Also a few other differences:

  • bindParam() also has the argument length which can(must) be used if you call a IN&OUT procedure to store the output back in the variable (Which also requires to append PDO::PARAM_INPUT_OUTPUT with an OR statement to the type argument)
  • With bindParam() & bindValue() you can specify the type of the value, which you can't do in the execute(), there everything is just a string (PDO::PARAM_STR)
  • hi, can you explain what it evaluates? I understand that placeholders are replaced with actual values in the sql statement. – AAB Apr 2 '15 at 22:10
  • @AAB Added an example hope it helps you to understand it more – Rizier123 Apr 2 '15 at 22:15
  • your second example you forgot to change bindParam to bindValue – developerwjk Apr 2 '15 at 22:16
  • yes it has :) Thank You! – AAB Apr 2 '15 at 22:16
  • @Rizier123 how do binding with placeholders work? I thought that say my query is INSERT INTO table(age) VALUES(?) then the question mark is replaced by the value I am supplying so if it is a string then my query will be INSERT INTO table(age) VALUES('12') – AAB Apr 2 '15 at 22:39
1

The benefit of bindParam over bindValue is that you can bind a variable before you decide what to put in it. Why you would actually ever need to do that, I don't know, but you might.

Bind Value

$x = function_call_to_determine_value();
$stmt->bindValue(':x',$x);
$stmt->execute();

Bind Param

$stmt->bindParam(':x',$x);
$x = function_call_to_determine_value();
$stmt->execute();
  • So is using $stmt = $db->prepare('INSERT INTO table(uname,age) VALUES(:uname,:age)'); $stmt->execute(array(':uname'=>$uname,':age'=>$age)); instead of bindValue ok? – AAB Apr 2 '15 at 22:13
  • @AAB Bind params via an array in execute binds them as string...with bindParam and bindValue you can specify the data type as something else if you want. So not exactly the same. – developerwjk Apr 2 '15 at 22:14
  • so execute(array("age"=>$age)) is different from bindParam(":age",$age,PARAM_INT) or did you mean to say I can specify age to be a string in bindParam if i wanted to? – AAB Apr 2 '15 at 22:21
  • @AAB Yes, execute(array("age"=>$age)) will bind age as string. bindParam(":age",$age) will also bind it as string. But you can do bindParam(":age",$age,PARAM_INT). You cannot bind as int with execute(array) at all. – developerwjk Apr 2 '15 at 22:25
  • how do binding with placeholders work? I thought that say my query is INSERT INTO table(age) VALUES(?) then the question mark is replaced by the value I am supplying so if it is a string then my query will be INSERT INTO table(age) VALUES('12') – AAB Apr 2 '15 at 22:34

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