16

This question already has an answer here:

for (int i = 99; i --> 0;) {
    System.out.println(i);
}

Above code works, and has the exactly same result of

for (int i = 99; i >= 0; i--) {
    System.out.println(i);
}

What does the syntax "-->" originally mean in Java? Since almost reachable search engines disallow special characters, I cannot seem to find the answer.

marked as duplicate by Rohit Jain java Apr 3 '15 at 9:38

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • How could it get 6 upvotes? – Bartłomiej Szałach Apr 5 '15 at 21:14
  • 8
    @onegrx Well, the original one has 3k. – TigerHix Apr 8 '15 at 15:39
  • Great senior developers write their code so that it can be read by others....only a junior would want to use this, to make him look like a pro... – Amos Kosgei Oct 12 '18 at 7:43
21

--> is not a new operator.

It is just a conjunction of the operators -- and >.

You first compare, and then decrement the variable.

That is,

i --> 0

becomes effectively

i > 0; //Compare
i--; //and decrement
  • 5
    It's the reverse actually. First comparison, then decrement. – Rohit Jain Apr 3 '15 at 9:39
  • 1
    Didn't downvote, but whoever did, that's probably because you're answer is still not fully current. Your 3rd statement still needs change. – Rohit Jain Apr 3 '15 at 9:42
  • 1
    Thanks for the answer! – TigerHix Apr 3 '15 at 10:00
8

i --> 0 means i-- > 0, i is decrememnted and the previous value of i is compared to 0.

  • Thanks! Never thought of that.. – TigerHix Apr 3 '15 at 10:00
4

--> is not any operator. It is just the cocatenation of -- and >.

So when you write

i-->0 it means compare the value of i and then decrement it.

So for better readability it can be written as

for (int i = 99; (i--)> 0;) {
3

notice here the increment/decrement place is not appeared. So it decrement i by 1 and compare it with 0.

The comparison check whether i is greater than 0 after the decrement performed.

2

there is no any operator --> its simply i-- > 0 first it will do post decrements. then it will check condition and compare with 0 whether its greater than are not.

Remember i's value will not be changed while comparison (i will be 1) after comparison it will decrements the value (i will now be 0) and print.

2

i-- > 0

i-- is post decrement

> is greater than

for (initializatin; boolean expression;updation){
}

So you did initialization and but you checked boolean expression and updated in one step so it worked.

  • 1
    Neither i-- is post-increment, nor > is less than sign. – Rohit Jain Apr 3 '15 at 9:40
  • @RohitJain my mistake updated – singhakash Apr 3 '15 at 9:43

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