23

In Java, I can have an object like this:

public class MyObject {

    private Date date;

    public Date getDate() {
        return date;
    }

    public void setDate(Date date) {
        this.date = date;
    }

    public void setDate(String date) {
        this.date = parseDateString(date);
    }

    private Date parseDateString(String date) {
        // do magic here
        return dateObj;
    }

}

This is nice, because I have one getter for my properties, and multiple setters. I can set the "date" property by passing in either a Date object, or a String, and let the class figure it out.

In C# it looks like things are a little different. I can do this:

public class MyObject
{
    public DateTime Date { get; set; }
}

The shorthand here is obviously optimal. However, I'm not sure if there's any built-in way to overload the setter to accept multiple types. I realize I could create a separate public method to set the value, but that would sacrifice the ability to use object initializers.

Is there any way to directly overload the setter on public properties for C#? Or is this just a language limitation, and it can't be done?

  • 2
    Not an answer, but I would leave the string-to-date parsing outside the MyClass. In C# you just need to use DateTime.Parse, anyway. – Arturo Torres Sánchez Apr 3 '15 at 19:40
22

All other answers are correct... but if you insist, you can do it in several ways:

  1. Use a second property with just a setter:

    public string DateText { set { Date = ParseDateString(value); } }
    

    Avoid this if possible, it only adds confusion :-)

  2. Use methods instead of properties (same as you do in Java). Methods can be overloaded. This should be the most recommended way.

  3. Use a custom class (instead of DateTime) and provide implicit conversions between DateTime, string, and your class. Not recommended unless you are going to use this everywhere else.

  4. Change the property to object and provide your conversions in the setter: please don't do this

  • 1
    I'd bold-emphasis the if you insist part, set-only properties are a code smell in my books...+1 for completeness though ;) – Mathieu Guindon Apr 3 '15 at 18:48
  • @Mat'sMug definitely. I've edited to add extra comments :-) – Jcl Apr 3 '15 at 18:49
  • 3
    Implicit conversions are very tricky when it comes to reading code. Instead you could use explicit conversions. – Erno de Weerd Apr 3 '15 at 18:50
  • @ErnodeWeerd I don't recommend or endorse that way, but using explicit conversions kinda defies the purpose of "making it easy for the caller", since if you have to cast, you could aswell do the conversion (meaning: ParseDateString("1/1/1900") vs (MyDate)"1/1/1900" is not a lot of gain :-) )... but yes, I agree, and I'd personally avoid implicit conversions unless they are really necessary and extremely clear (which wouldn't be the case with a date/string). – Jcl Apr 6 '15 at 15:41
  • @Jcl - I understand. I think the problem here is that the interpretation of "easy for the caller" is too vague in the original post. I just added the comment to prevent readers from thinking "Hey that is cool" and in the end getting bitten when trying to debug. – Erno de Weerd Apr 6 '15 at 16:14
16

Well, you're comparing apples to bananas. What you have in Java here:

public void setDate(Date date) {
    this.date = date;
}

public void setDate(String date) {
    this.date = parseDateString(date);
}

Would look like this in C#:

public void SetDate(Date date) 
{
    this.date = date;
}

public void SetDate(String date) 
{
    this.date = ParseDateString(date);
}

The only difference being the PascalCase member names and the location of the scope-opening brace.

Your Java code has overloaded methods; the above C# has overloaded methods.

AFAIK you can't overload a property setter, because:

public DateTime Date 
{ 
    get { return this.date; }
    set { this.date = value; }
}

...the type of value is determined by the type of the member, here DateTime.

So if you want method overloads, overload methods, not properties. Remember that C# properties are just syntax sugar for getter & setter methods anyway.

  • I don't think there's any conceptual reason why .NET couldn't have allowed properties to have overloaded setters, if .NET languages, upon seeing property-set syntax, would use the same overload logic as they would for a method (with the right-hand type of the expression as the first argument). Semantically such a thing would be dodgy in cases where the result would be different from coercing the value to be set to the property's main type, but in cases where multiple types are mutually convertible, setting a prop directly to a particular type may be faster than converting and then setting. – supercat Apr 3 '15 at 20:48
  • 1
    @supercat I think it's more a language/syntax constraint (C#) than a .NET-wide thing. VB.NET does support parameterized getters/setters (heck, VB6 did!). Properties compile to get_ and set_ methods in CIL if I remember correctly. – Mathieu Guindon Apr 3 '15 at 20:55
  • In VB.NET and C#, property resolution occurs before the system determines what is being done with the property. If it didn't, one could have an IReadableFoo<out T> interface which exposes a Foo property with a getter and IWritableFoo<in T> which exposes a Foo with a setter, and then have IReadWriteFoo<T> simply inherit both. Because of the way binding is done, however, neither the getter nor setter will work on a variable of type IReadWriteFoo<T>; an attempt to say it.Foo=9; or x=it.Foo; will be rejected because it's (supposedly) ambiguous whether one is trying to use... – supercat Apr 3 '15 at 21:00
  • ...IReadableFoo<T>.Foo or IWritableFoo<T>.Foo. I think it unfortunate that C# lacks parameterized indexers because there are cases where e.g. a generic version of OrderedDictionary could benefit from having afoo.ByIndex[int] and foo.ByKey[TKey] indexed properties without having to allow var x=foo.ByIndex;. – supercat Apr 3 '15 at 21:03
10

The auto properties do not support this. So you will have to do the same as you do in Java.

Of course you could mix these as well: provide an auto property and extra set-methods to set the property using different types.

public class MyObject 
{
    public DateTime Date { get; set; }

    public void SetDate(string date) 
    {
        this.Date = DateTime.Parse(date);
    }    
}
10

I'm going to write a different answer and claim that

public void setDate(Date date) {
    this.date = date;
}

public void setDate(String date) {
    this.date = parseDateString(date);
}

is bad practice to begin with.

By doing the above, you are claiming that both strings and dates are valid values for Date. This is not the case - what you really want is a Date. If the user has a string and wants it converted a Date, they should be relying on the string-parsing functionality in the Date API (DateFormat.parse() in Java, DateTime.Parse() in C#), not your API.

If Date is a class defined by you and you really do want Date and string to be interchangable, you should be using implicit conversations in the Date class, not asking users of your Date class to write overloads.

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