209

I am starting to learn Swift, and have been following the very good Stanford University video lectures on YouTube. Here is a link if you are interested or it helps (although it isn't required to understand my problem):

Developing iOS 8 Apps with Swift - 2. More Xcode and Swift, MVC

While following the lectures I got to a point where (as far as I could tell) my code was identical to the code in the video but on my system I got a compiler error. After a lot of trial and error I have managed to reduce my code to two examples, one of which generates an error, the other or which doesn't, but I have no idea what is actually causing the error or how to resolve it.

The code which creates the error is:

import UIKit

class BugViewController: UIViewController
{
    func perform(operation: (Double) -> Double) {
    }

    func perform(operation: (Double, Double) -> Double) {
    }
}

This creates the following compiler error:

Method 'perform' with Objective-C selector 'perform: ' conflicts with previous declaration with the same Objective-C selector

By simply removing the sub-classing of UIViewController the code compiles:

import UIKit

class BugViewController
{
    func perform(operation: (Double) -> Double) {
    }

    func perform(operation: (Double, Double) -> Double) {
    }
}

Some other information which may or may not be relevant:

  • I have recently upgraded to Yosemite.
  • When I installed Xcode, I ended up with a Beta version (Version 6.3 (6D543q)) because (if I remember correctly) this was the version I needed to run on my version of OS X.

I am half hoping this is a bug in the compiler because otherwise this doesn't make any sense to me. Any help very gratefully received!

  • 3
    You can run Xcode 6.2 on Yosemite. You can download it from the app store and it can live on your system with the Beta version. I wouldn't recommend using Xcode 6.3 for the Stanford class at this point because it beta and includes Swift 1.2 which is different that the earlier version of Swift used in the videos. – vacawama Apr 5 '15 at 13:34
  • 2
    The (currently accepted) answer from user (feb) from Apr 5 is not the best one anymore. Instead the answer from (James Zhang) from Apr 16 is more specific and correct. – phlebotinum Jun 17 '15 at 13:25
144
0

Objective-C does not support method overloading, you have to use a different method name. When you inherited UIViewController you inherited NSObject and made the class interopable to Obj-C. Swift on the other hand does support overloading, that's why it works when you remove the inheritance.

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    Objective-C SUPPORTS method overriding (with a con of (suppressable) compiler warnings notifying you about overloading something already implemented), Apple just don't want you to do so to keep their frameworks away from being overloaded. I'm using such overloads f.e. on UIFont every day. – Michi Oct 20 '15 at 6:06
  • @polarwar's answer below is the best one for Swift 2: stackoverflow.com/a/31500740/144088 – Crashalot Jan 20 '16 at 8:02
237
0

I myself am also taking the Standford course and I got stuck here for a long time too, but after some searching, I found something from here: Xcode release notes and it mentioned something below:

Swift 1.2 is strict about checking type-based overloading of @objc methods and initializers, something not supported by Objective-C.

// Has the Objective-C selector "performOperation:".
func performOperation(op: NSOperation) { /* do something */ }
// Also has the selector "performOperation:".
func performOperation(fn: () -> Void) {
    self.performOperation(NSBlockOperation(block: fn))
}

This code would work when invoked from Swift, but could easily crash if invoked from Objective-C. To solve this problem, use a type that is not supported by Objective-C to prevent the Swift compiler from exposing the member to the Objective-C runtime:

  • If it makes sense, mark the member as private to disable inference of @objc.
  • Otherwise, use a dummy parameter with a default value, for example: _ nonobjc: () = (). (19826275)

Overrides of methods exposed to Objective-C in private subclasses are not inferred to be @objc, causing the Swift compiler to crash. Explicitly add the @objc attribute to any such overriding methods. (19935352)

Symbols from SDKs are not available when using Open Quickly in a project or workspace that uses Swift. (20349540)

what i did was just adding "private" in front of the override method like this:

    private func performOperation(operation: Double -> Double) {
    if operandStack.count >= 1 {
        displayValue = operation(operandStack.removeLast())
        enter()
    }
}
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  • 3
    This solution is the most viable I find imho, as this totally makes sense to set this method private – demental May 31 '15 at 11:12
  • 38
    Please note that there's now also a @nonobjc attribute, which can be used to exclude a method from the Objective-C runtime. – Erik J Nov 17 '15 at 8:42
  • 2
    I second @ErikJ's comment and polarwar's answer below. This seems to be the best answer moving forward with Swift 2 and xcode 7. If you haven't updated yet, I strongly recommend it. – Austin A Nov 25 '15 at 21:08
  • @polarwar's answer below is the best one for Swift 2: stackoverflow.com/a/31500740/144088 – Crashalot Jan 20 '16 at 8:03
111
0

As it has already been answered, ObjC doesn't support method overloading (two methods with the same name) and In swift 2 under Xcode 7 there are two options to solve this kind of problems. One option is to rename the method using the attribute: @objc(newNameMethod:)

func methodOne(par1, par2) {...}

@objc(methodTwo:)
func methodOne(par1) {...}

another option to solve this problem in Xcode 7+ is by applying @nonobjc attribute to any method, subscript or initialiser

func methodOne() {...}

@nonobjc
func methodOne() {...}
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  • 6
    this solves the problem for swift 2 (and up). should be updated as most correct answer. ty. – Maxim Veksler Aug 24 '15 at 16:30
  • 2
    For anyone using Swift 2 and Xcode 7 + this is the correct answer I agree with polarwar – TerNovi Oct 15 '15 at 1:13
17
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The problem is UIViewController is an @objc class. When inheriting from UIViewController, BugViewController is also a @objc class.

This means it must conform to the rules of Objective-C selectors (the name of a method). The methods func perform(operation: (Double) -> Double) and func perform(operation: (Double, Double) -> Double) both have the same selector @selector(perform:). This is not allowed.

To resolve this, use different names: like func perform1(operation: (Double) -> Double) and func perform2(operation: (Double, Double) -> Double).


I think the best way to handle this is to give your perform() methods more descriptive names. What do these methods do? How do they change the state of the view controller? Look at the other UIViewController methods to get a feel for the style of method naming, or read Method Names Should Be Expressive and Unique Within a Class

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  • Thanks - this answers my question perfectly and as you were the first I will mark this as correct. – Auspice Apr 5 '15 at 13:33
  • Having said that I still don't understand why the code on the lecture worked as I am pretty sure it did what my non-compiling code did! Hey ho - I will go back and double check it. There must be something different. – Auspice Apr 5 '15 at 13:36
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    @Auspice It might not have produced errors with the version of Xcode they were using for the videos but it was still an issue. It wasn't until Xcode 6.3 that the compiler was able to detect this an warn you. – Mick MacCallum Apr 5 '15 at 14:08
  • 3
    Paul Hegarty wants to demonstrate function 'overloading' here (2 functions with the same name, but different set of arguments), so he does use the same method name on purpose! Overloading is only allowed in Swift, not in Objective-C. That's why the solution is either to remove the inheritance form UIViewController (which is an Objective-C class), or declare the method private. Both solutions are explained in detail in the other answers here. – Ronny Webers May 6 '15 at 19:44
  • Actually i used private keyword infront of the function. like,private func performOperation(operation: Double -> Double) {} and private func performOperation(operation: (Double,Double) -> Double) {} Here i achieved the method overloading with help of PRIVATE. because i used both of them in ViewController.Swift only. Why compiler does not say any Error? – iTag Jul 27 '15 at 5:52
5
0

From https://developer.apple.com/library/ios/releasenotes/DeveloperTools/RN-Xcode/Chapters/xc6_release_notes.html under "Xcode 6.3 Release Notes" -> "Swift Language Changes" you find

Swift now detects discrepancies between overloading and overriding in the Swift type system and the effective behavior seen via the Objective-C runtime.

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2
0

I got the same error due to having having two methods with the same Obj-C signature:

static func prepareForUpSyncing(obj : NSManagedObject!) -> Bool
static func prepareForUpSyncing(objs : [NSManagedObject]!) -> Bool

I didn't want to mark one of them as @nonobjc due to possibility of unforseen consequences at runtime. (Someone can correct me if there is no possibility)

Resolved it by using Swift's external parameter name feature (I made external name same as local name) to the second method, which effectively changes the Obj-c method signature:

static func prepareForUpSyncing(objs objs : [NSManagedObject]!) -> Bool {
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