4

I'm getting an exception which says "Access Denied" when the users permissions are sufficient, how do I catch an exception and check for "Access Denied" so that I can show the user a friendlier "Sorry Access Denied" message?

Thanks Beginner :-)

15

You don't really want to check the string of the message, you want to check the type of the message, which can be easily done by catching only the type(s) of exception you are checking for. The following example will catch two different types of exceptions and do different actions based on what if any error occurs. (Note: the names of the exceptions are made up)

try {
    ...
} catch (SomeKindOfException ex) {
    MessageBox.Show(ex.Message);
} catch (AccessDeniedException ex) {
    //Do something else
}
  • In this case, you're probably getting an UnauthorizedAccessException. – Jason Anderson Nov 17 '08 at 0:26
  • I was editing my comment as you posted this :) – Ed S. Nov 17 '08 at 0:26
  • +1 for example showing a chain of catches. I'm surprised how often even experienced devs aren't aware of this, though to their credit, they're often coming from a C background. – Greg D Nov 17 '08 at 5:11
10

I think the safest thing to do here (and surprisingly none of the answers show this) is to

  • Catch as specific an exception type as you can. Really try to avoid catching all exceptions.
  • Test the exception message for string.ToLowerInvariant() containing your target string.
  • re-throw if it's not what you expect!

like so:

try
{
    int result = DoStuff(param);
}
catch (System.IO.IOException ioex)
{
    if (ioex.Message.ToLowerInvariant().Contains("find me"))
    {
        .. do whatever ..
    }
    else
    {
        // no idea what just happened; we gotta crash
        throw;
    }
}
  • 1
    I'm really, really pleased to that you started by outlining good practice and specifically rethrowing. – Jordan Gray Oct 10 '12 at 16:53
  • 1
    Seriously? Checking the Message string seems like terrible advice to me: (1) The specific strings are implementation details and may change. (2) Many strings are localized, so the check will almost certainly fail on a non-English system. – Sebastian Negraszus Feb 18 '16 at 10:19
  • Sometime checking the message of exception is the only thing you can do with 3rd party libraries.It is a best approach of all bad aproaches. If you run server application on your own server, you control localization and Framework udpates. If you release desktop application worldwide, you can still check it. You can catch exception and execute another thread with English Cultureinfo and read the exception details on that "English" thread. But this is not usually needed, because 3rd party libraries seldom localize exceptions. – Tomas Kubes Nov 6 '17 at 18:10
6

If you are using a try catch block...

try
{
    //error occurs
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    MessageBox.show(ex.Message);
}

Obviously that is pretty crappy error handling, but it shows that the Exception object contains the error string. You can narrow down the handling of different exceptions by catching different exception types.

Try
{
    //error occurs
}
catch (AccessDeniedException ex)
{
    MessageBox.show(ex.Message);
}
catch (FieldAccessException)
{

}
// etc...
2

Simple:

try
{
    YourCommandWhichResultsInDeniedAccess();
}
catch (AccessDeniedException)
{
    MessageBox.Show('Access Denied');
}

If you don't know the type of the Exception and/or you want to check the Exception message instead, do the following:

try
{
    YourCommandWhichResultsInDeniedAccess();
}
catch (Exception e)
{
   if (e.Message == 'Access Denied')
   {
       MessageBox.Show('Access Denied')
   }
}
  • Exceptions usually have more details than just access denied. They also may have different case. I would try something like "if (e.Message.ToLower().Contains("access denied"))" as my condition if not catching a specific "AccessDeniedException". – Dan Herbert Nov 17 '08 at 0:36
  • With doing a catch on the base Exception type but only taking action when that if statement is true, there is a big gap for other exceptions to go unnoticed. If you do have to catch Exception, there should be an else statement that either handles all other exceptions or re throws the exception. – ManiacZX Nov 17 '08 at 13:56
  • Swallowing exceptions that don't exactly match "Access Denied" without rethrowing gives me a bit of heartburn. re-throw what you don't know – Chris Ballance Nov 13 '15 at 16:48
1

Using exception filters in C# 6.0 it is even easier:

try
{
    int result = DoStuff(param);
}
catch (IOException ex) 
when (ex.Message.ToLowerInvariant().Contains("find me")) 
{
    //.. do whatever ..
}
0

Just a modification from above, but working with datatable and database and dropdownlist

try {
        drop_grup_head.SelectedValue = ds.Rows[0]["group_head"].ToString();
     }
     catch (Exception exce ) {
        if (exce.Message.ToLowerInvariant().Contains("does not exist in the list")) {
           drop_grup_head.SelectedValue = "0";
        }
     }
-2

First off - should look into the permissions issue rather than tackling the exception solely. If "Access Denied" is thrown then there must either be a permissions issues or a lock of some sort.

Anyways, "Message" is a string and you can use the .Contains method on it to check for "Access Denied".

You can't change the "Message" property as it has no setter, but you can handle the exception and display a polite message.

MessageBox.Show("Sorry, Access Denied"); for instance.

Edit: as mentioned above you should check for the type of exception. e.g. AccessDeniedException rather than use something as generic as "Exception".


try
        {
            // code here which throws exception
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            if (ex.Message.Contains("Access Denied"))
            {
                MessageBox.Show("Sorry, Access Denied", "This is a polite error message");
            }
        }

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