6

Is index.html meant to be just the first page among many separate HTML pages, or is it supposed to be the only page, and the other pages are just snippets put inside of it? And by supposed to, I mean, what is the best/most common practice?

I used to think the former, but I just tried using HTML5-Boilerplate and it's setup seemed like it was implying the latter. All this awful meta stuff and imports (is there a term for that?) is in the index.html, and I don't want to have to put that in every single page. Same goes with the navigation bar and the footer which is on every page. And the project structure doesn't have an html folder (obviously I could make my own, but I took it as implying I didn't need one). It sounds ideal if instead of loading a different html page I just leave a placeholder and insert another file, but I don't know how to do that other than an iframe, which would be ugly. How would this approach work, if it is the right way?

If you couldn't tell I'm very much a beginner. I feel like this must be a common question but I don't know what the term(s) for this is, so I've been having trouble searching. Thank you

3 Answers 3

9

Many web servers will have a 'default document' that is returned when you specify just a path and no file name. So browsing to http://example.com will return the default document from the document root directory of that domain.

Quite often the default document can be named index.html, index.htm or -if PHP is installed- index.php, but they can be other names as well, depending on the configuration.

Some sites are built up from many actual html files, while other, more dynamic sites usually look like they consist of many html pages, but actually they just have a single entry page (like index.php) that handles all requests and generates output based on the url.

HTML5 Boilerplate (assuming you mean this one) describes a structure for a site. This structure is mostly the build-up of HTML, CSS and JavaScript. The index.html included with it is only a skeleton HTML file. It describes what your output should look like. How that output is generated is up to you. You can create a big folder full of separate HTML files, or a dynamic site with a single entry point, like described above. The HTML5 document, the CSS and all the other front-end stuff are interpreted by the browser, and it doesn't care how that content was generated.

1

Is index.html meant to be just the first page among many separate HTML pages, or is it supposed to be the only page... I mean, what is the best/most common practice?

index.html is best left as the "home page" or "landing page". When opening your site's root directory in a browser, index.html will be opened by default. If you have no index.html page, you will get a directory listing of all of your files on that server (live or localhost), acting just like a file explorer on your local machine.

All this awful meta stuff and imports (is there a term for that?) is in the index.html, and I don't want to have to put that in every single page. Same goes with the navigation bar and the footer which is on every page.

This doesn't have much to do with the index.html page. If you do not want to have all of your nav, header, footer, scripts, ect. repeated on every page, you will have to use PHP (specifically: includes). Otherwise, if you are using only HTML, you will have to repeat the same information on every page.

The rest of your question goes a little off topic, since explaining index.html does not really go into iframes or any of what you might put into a page.

3
  • Are there other languages than PHP that allow HTML includes? Commented Apr 5, 2015 at 21:56
  • There are other languages that use includes, PHP being the most common and easiest in my opinion. But in this case, thefistopher is using HTML and saying "All this awful meta stuff and imports (is there a term for that?) is in the index.html, and I don't want to have to put that in every single page." I wanted to let them know that when using only HTML you will have to put/repeat those things on every page.
    – IsoLennox
    Commented Apr 5, 2015 at 21:59
  • It is not true that in the absence of index.html, the browser will show the directory contents !!! There are other factors in play. I think if you are using god mode to answer, then it needs to be perfect. Commented Jul 26, 2022 at 22:23
-1

Many websites use htaccess files to determine which web page in your website acts as a default page. index.html is generally used as the base page in most htaccess files, followed by home.html if index.html cannot be found. Of course, these files and the order can be changed but this is default behavior. Here is an example of how web host ipage orders their .htacess priority:

index.html
index.htm
default.htm
default.html
Default.htm
home.html
home.htm
Home.chtml
Home.html
Home.htm
index.py
index.php
index.shtml
default.shtml
index.php3
index.pl
index.cgi
3
  • When you use terms like "most", then it's probably wise to back that up with evidence. Plenty of systems don't use htaccess.
    – Lee Taylor
    Commented Apr 5, 2015 at 21:52
  • .htaccess is an Apache configuration file. For example, asp.net doesn't use htaccess files
    – Lee Taylor
    Commented Apr 5, 2015 at 21:55
  • @LeeTaylor - regardless of the usage of most. its a valid answer. Commented Jul 26, 2022 at 22:25

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.