Let's say I have a YAML file looking like this:

  en:
    errors:
      # Some comment
      format: "%{attribute} %{message}"

      # One more comment
      messages:
        "1": "Message 1"
        "2": "Message 2"

    long_error_message: |
      This is a
      multiline message

    date:
      format: "YYYY-MM-DD"

How can I read this into a Ruby Hash like this?

{
  'en': {
    'errors': {
      'format': { value: '%{attribute} %{message}', line: 4 }
      'messages': {
        '1': { value: 'Message 1', line: 8 },
        '2': { value: 'Message 2', line: 9 }
      }
      'long_error_message' : { value: "This is a\nmultiline message", line: 11 }
    },
    'date': {
      'format': { value: 'YYYY-MM-DD', line: 16 }
    }
  }
}

I've tried using the tip mentioned in YAML: Find line number of key? as a starting point and implemented a Psych::Handler, but it felt like I had to rewrite lots of code from Psych in order to get this to work.

Any ideas how I can solve this?

  • 1
    I started looking into it and it seems like a headache. I thought of monkey patching the default handler (Psych::TreeBuilder) and the calling method, but then I got stuck realizing I had to monkey patch Psych::Nodes and Psych::Visitors::ToRuby and I just gave up. – Myst Apr 12 '15 at 4:19
up vote 5 down vote accepted
+100

It looks like you want to take any scalar value that is a mapping value and replace it with a hash with a value key containing the original value, and a line key with the line number.

The following nearly works, the main problem being the multiline string where the line number given is the start of the next thing in the Yaml. The problem is that by the time the handler scalar method is called the parser has already moved beyond the scalar of interest, and so mark is giving the line of the position when it knows the scalar has ended. In most cases in your example this doesn’t matter, but with the multiline case it gives the wrong value. I can’t see any way of getting parser info from mark for the beginning of scalars without going into the Psych C code.

require 'psych'

# Psych's first step is to parse the Yaml into an AST of Node objects
# so we open the Node class and add a way to track the line.
class Psych::Nodes::Node
  attr_accessor :line
end

# We need to provide a handler that will add the line to the node
# as it is parsed. TreeBuilder is the "usual" handler, that
# creates the AST.
class LineNumberHandler < Psych::TreeBuilder

  # The handler needs access to the parser in order to call mark
  attr_accessor :parser

  # We are only interested in scalars, so here we override 
  # the method so that it calls mark and adds the line info
  # to the node.
  def scalar value, anchor, tag, plain, quoted, style
    mark = parser.mark
    s = super
    s.line = mark.line
    s
  end
end

# The next step is to convert the AST to a Ruby object.
# Psych does this using the visitor pattern with the ToRuby
# visitor. Here we patch ToRuby rather than inherit from it
# as it makes the last step a little easier.
class Psych::Visitors::ToRuby

  # This is the method for creating hashes. There may be problems
  # with Yaml mappings that have tags.
  def revive_hash hash, o
    o.children.each_slice(2) { |k,v|
      key = accept(k)
      val = accept(v)

      # This is the important bit. If the value is a scalar,
      # we replace it with the desired hash.
      if v.is_a? ::Psych::Nodes::Scalar
        val = { "value" => val, "line" => v.line + 1} # line is 0 based, so + 1
      end

      # Code dealing with << (for merging hashes) omitted.
      # If you need this you will probably need to copy it
      # in here. See the method:
      # https://github.com/tenderlove/psych/blob/v2.0.13/lib/psych/visitors/to_ruby.rb#L333-L365

      hash[key] = val
    }
    hash
  end
end

yaml = get_yaml_from_wherever

# Put it all together    
handler = LineNumberHandler.new
parser =  Psych::Parser.new(handler)
# Provide the handler with a reference to the parser
handler.parser = parser

# The actual parsing
parser.parse yaml
# We patched ToRuby rather than inherit so we can use to_ruby here
puts handler.root.to_ruby
  • I upvoted your answer since it gave me an idea on how it could be solved. The trick is that one might simply cheat a default parser passing {value: value, line: line} instead of patching the ToRuby class. Your implementation has issues with multilines as well (you catch the last line number, while OP asked to catch the first one.) – Aleksei Matiushkin Apr 13 '15 at 10:23
  • 1
    Your approach finally won :) Introduce @mark instance variable on LineNumberHandler and then inside scalar: s.line = @mark ; @mark = parser.mark.line. – Aleksei Matiushkin Apr 13 '15 at 15:07
  • Thank you matt for this great solution and @mudasobwa for finding a way to make this even work with multiline strings! I'm marking this as answer. – Gerhard Schlager Apr 13 '15 at 20:17

I would suggest you to choose @matt’s solution. Besides it’s a way more circumspect, it handles scalars properly.


The trick might be to monkeypatch TreeBuilder#scalar method:

y='
en:
  errors:
    # Some comment
    format: "%{attribute} %{message}"

    # One more comment
    messages:
      "1": "Message 1"
      "2": "Message 2"

  long_error_message: |
    This is a
    multiline message

  date:
    format: "YYYY-MM-DD"'

require 'yaml'

yphc = Class.new(YAML.parser.handler.class) do
  def scalar value, anchor, tag, plain, quoted, style
    value = { value: value, line: $line } if style > 1 
    $line = $parser.mark.line + 1  # handle multilines properly
    super value, anchor, tag, plain, quoted, style
  end 
end

$parser = Psych::Parser.new(yphc.new)

# more careful handling required for multidocs    
result = $parser.parse(y).handler.root.to_ruby[0]

Actually, we are almost done. The only thing left is to leave patched values with line numbers in leaves only. I did not put this logic inside parsing stuff on purpose.

def unmark_keys hash
  hash.map do |k,v|
    [k.is_a?(Hash) ? k[:value] : k, v.is_a?(Hash) ? unmark_keys(v) : v]
  end.to_h
end

p unmark_keys result

#⇒ {"en"=>
#⇒   {"errors"=>
#⇒     {
#⇒       "format"=>{:value=>"%{attribute} %{message}", :line=>4},
#⇒       "messages"=>
#⇒          {
#⇒            "1"=>{:value=>"Message 1", :line=>8}, 
#⇒            "2"=>{:value=>"Message 2", :line=>9}
#⇒       }
#⇒     }, 
#⇒     "long_error_message"=>{
#⇒        :value=>"This is a\nmultiline message\n", :line=>11
#⇒     }, 
#⇒     "date"=>{"format"=>{:value=>"YYYY-MM-DD", :line=>16}}
#⇒   }
#⇒ }

Surely one might want to get rid of global variables, etc. I tried to keep the core implementation as clean as possible.

Here we go. Hope it helps.

UPD Thanks to @matt, the code above fails on scalars:

key1:
  val1

key2: val2

This syntax is permitted by YAML, but the approach above has no chance to handle it properly. No line will be returned for that. Besides the vexatious lack of scalar support, lines are reported properly for anything else, please refer to comments to this answer for further details.

  • This won’t work when the mapping value isn’t on the same line as the key (it will give the line number of the key). The underlying problem in both our answers seems to be we can’t get the parser info at the start of an element, only the end. (Also you have an off-by-one error: the line given by mark is zero based, we want 1 based so you need to +1. It’s not obvious in your code because you have an empty line at the start of your Yaml string). – matt Apr 13 '15 at 13:38
  • @matt Thanks for off-by-one error note: fixed. I did not get what do you mean by “when the mapping value isn’t on the same line as the key.” It is YAML, isn’t it? long_error_message’s line in my example is detected correctly. – Aleksei Matiushkin Apr 13 '15 at 13:46
  • It doesn’t occur in the sample given in the question, but see gist.github.com/mattwildig/f109bdea61e9d8742811. My solution also suffers in this case, as the parser needs to continue until it is sure the element is finished. Your approach seems to give the better results overall, but neither is exact. – matt Apr 13 '15 at 14:20
  • @matt Huh. For your example my approach gives {"line1"=>"line2", "line4"=>{:value=>"line5\nline6", :line=>4}}... Latter :line => 4 is fine, but there is no line for the former case because Psych returns style==1 for it. Updated an answer to mention this. – Aleksei Matiushkin Apr 13 '15 at 14:36
  • @matt BTW, by changing line2 to "line2" I yielded: {"line1"=>{:value=>"line2", :line=>1}, "line4"=>{:value=>"line5\nline6", :line=>4}}. So, the line is detected correctly; my code has problems with detecting scalars like a: b. – Aleksei Matiushkin Apr 13 '15 at 14:44

I've taken @matt's solution and created a version that requires no mankey-patching. It also handles values that span multiple lines and YAML's << operator.

require "psych"
require "pp"

ValueWithLineNumbers = Struct.new(:value, :lines)

class Psych::Nodes::ScalarWithLineNumber < Psych::Nodes::Scalar
  attr_reader :line_number

  def initialize(*args, line_number)
    super(*args)
    @line_number = line_number
  end
end

class Psych::TreeWithLineNumbersBuilder < Psych::TreeBuilder
  attr_accessor :parser

  def scalar(*args)
    node = Psych::Nodes::ScalarWithLineNumber.new(*args, parser.mark.line)
    @last.children << node
    node
  end
end

class Psych::Visitors::ToRubyWithLineNumbers < Psych::Visitors::ToRuby
  def visit_Psych_Nodes_ScalarWithLineNumber(node)
    visit_Psych_Nodes_Scalar(node)
  end

  private

  def revive_hash(hash, node)
    node.children.each_slice(2) do |k, v|
      key = accept(k)
      val = accept(v)

      if v.is_a? Psych::Nodes::ScalarWithLineNumber
        start_line = end_line = v.line_number + 1

        if k.is_a? Psych::Nodes::ScalarWithLineNumber
          start_line = k.line_number + 1
        end
        val = ValueWithLineNumbers.new(val, start_line..end_line)
      end

      if key == SHOVEL && k.tag != "tag:yaml.org,2002:str"
        case v
        when Psych::Nodes::Alias, Psych::Nodes::Mapping
          begin
            hash.merge! val
          rescue TypeError
            hash[key] = val
          end
        when Psych::Nodes::Sequence
          begin
            h = {}
            val.reverse_each do |value|
              h.merge! value
            end
            hash.merge! h
          rescue TypeError
            hash[key] = val
          end
        else
          hash[key] = val
        end
      else
        hash[key] = val
      end
    end

    hash
  end
end

# Usage:
handler = Psych::TreeWithLineNumbersBuilder.new
handler.parser = Psych::Parser.new(handler)

handler.parser.parse(yaml)

ruby_with_line_numbers = 
Psych::Visitors::ToRubyWithLineNumbers.create.accept(handler.root)

pp ruby_with_line_numbers

I've posted a gist of the above along with some comments and examples

We can add the numbers manually by recursing through the parsed hash provided by Psych and finding the line number of each key. The following code will match the result you specified.

require 'psych'

def add_line_numbers(lines, hash)
  # Ruby cannot iterate and modify a hash at the same time.
  # So we dup the hash and iterate over the dup.
  iterator = hash.dup
  iterator.each do |key, value|
    if value.is_a?(Hash)
      add_line_numbers(lines, value)
    else
      index = lines.index { |line| line =~ /^\s.?*#{key}.?\:/ }
      hash[key] = { "value" => value, "line" => (index + 1) }
    end
  end
end

yaml_file = File.expand_path('../foo.yml', __FILE__)
lines = File.readlines(yaml_file)
data = Psych.load(lines.join("\n"))
add_line_numbers(lines, data)
puts data
  • Thanks. I'm not sure if it's possible to use a Regex for finding the line number. I've updated my question with a more complex YAML. – Gerhard Schlager Apr 12 '15 at 19:29
  • No problem. I added a tweak to the regex that now handles the more complex YAML. We just had to allow for optional characters around the string key. – Jkarayusuf Apr 12 '15 at 23:14
  • 2
    Won't this fail if a key exists twice in the YAML (in different sub-hashes)? – undur_gongor Apr 13 '15 at 10:26

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