How can I shift a circular array in Perl?

For example,

use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dump;

my $a = [[1], [3], [2], [4]];
my $shift_index = 2;
circ_shift( $a, $shift_index );
dd $a;

should give output:

[[2], [4], [1], [3]]

So $shift_index is the number of positions to shift to the left.

up vote 6 down vote accepted

For moving elements on and off arrays, you use shift/unshift and push/pop.

use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;

my @list = ( "one", "two", "three", "four" );

push ( @list, shift @list);
print Dumper \@list;

unshift ( @list, pop @list );
print Dumper \@list;

therefore your 'shift' function would look a bit like:

sub cycle_list {
    my ( $list_ref, $number_shift ) = @_;
    for ( 1 .. $number_shift ) {
        push( @$list_ref, shift @$list_ref );
    }
}

cycle_list( \@list, 2 );
print Dumper \@list;

Passing the list by reference allows you to modify the referenced list. You could pass in a bunch of values and return the shifted list from the sub if you prefer.

my @a = qw(1 2 3 4);
my $i = 2;
push(@a, splice(@a, 0, $i));

As Denis Ibaev has intimated, circ_shift is best implemented using splice, which can pop multiple elements at once and doesn't need a for loop.

It would look like this

use strict;
use warnings;

use Data::Dump;

my $a = [[1], [3], [2], [4]];
my $shift_index = 1;
circ_shift( $a, $shift_index );

dd $a;

sub circ_shift {
  my ($list, $n) = @_;
  push @$list, splice @$list, 0, $n;
}

output

[[3], [2], [4], [1]]

If all you want is to go through the elements of the array in the rotated order, you do not need to mess with push, pop, or splice even though either modifying the array in place, or creating a new one are the most intuitive approaches for most of us.

You can, however, create an iterator that will traverse the array in the rotated order by applying an offset and clipping it using the size of the array:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my @x = ('a' .. 'z');

for my $d (3, 5, 43) {
    my $it = rotated_it(\@x, $d);
    print "@x[ map $it->($_), 1, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13 ]\n";
}

sub rotated_it {
    my $k = @{ $_[0] };
    my $c = $_[1] - 1;
    sub { ($_[0] + $c) % $k };
}

This can be particularly useful if the underlying array is large and all you need are a few elements from the rotated array, or if you want to be able to traverse the array one element at a time without creating extra arrays etc.

Output:

d f h j n p
f h j l p r
r t v x b d

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